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Author Topic: Dragon Fruit thread.  (Read 261035 times)

Jct

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1950 on: December 07, 2016, 01:18:06 PM »
I'll try to remember to take a picture of it when I get home.  That said, it resembles the Tricia only in that there are more than one per 'node', they are somewhat longish as compared to the pink variety I have, and they are silly sharp and hurt every time I poke myself.
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spaugh

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1951 on: December 10, 2016, 03:43:29 PM »
Can anyone tell me how big of a root system dragon fruits have?  I have a nice hillside Im thinking of putting some raised beds on and doing dragon fruit in them but there are spectic leach lines there.  Is it a shallow root system or is that asking for trouble?

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1952 on: December 10, 2016, 03:47:50 PM »
Can anyone tell me how big of a root system dragon fruits have?  I have a nice hillside Im thinking of putting some raised beds on and doing dragon fruit in them but there are spectic leach lines there.  Is it a shallow root system or is that asking for trouble?

shallow root system

MangCau

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1953 on: December 10, 2016, 04:26:50 PM »
Can anyone tell me how big of a root system dragon fruits have?  I have a nice hillside Im thinking of putting some raised beds on and doing dragon fruit in them but there are spectic leach lines there.  Is it a shallow root system or is that asking for trouble?

« Last Edit: January 24, 2017, 11:11:23 AM by MangCau »

spaugh

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1954 on: December 19, 2016, 05:17:33 PM »
What do you guys think about using a studded T post for DF stakes?  Any reason not to?  Seems easier and longer lasting than a 4x4.  They sell 8ft ones that would be plenty strong if they went in the ground a foot or 2. 

CTMIAMI

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1955 on: December 19, 2016, 06:42:10 PM »
I think you would need a HD  galvanized $20-$30  each to support the weight. PT 4x4 is like $8.00  and if in ground 2 ft can support a lot of weight
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spaugh

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1956 on: December 20, 2016, 04:09:38 PM »
They have the super HD T posts for 7$ a piece for 8ft.  I use them for fencing ad tomato and grape posts.  They dont have the circumference of a 4x4 but strength is there.  They are way easier to get in the ground than a 4x4 too.

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1957 on: December 20, 2016, 11:57:34 PM »
They have the super HD T posts for 7$ a piece for 8ft.  I use them for fencing ad tomato and grape posts.  They dont have the circumference of a 4x4 but strength is there.  They are way easier to get in the ground than a 4x4 too.


The UC Dragon Fruit researchers have gone from using 4 X 4 PT wood posts to metal fence posts for Dragon Fruit plant support.



« Last Edit: December 21, 2016, 12:42:52 AM by ricshaw »

fyliu

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1958 on: December 21, 2016, 12:57:26 AM »
Richard, do you know how the UC research do the metal posts? How far down they go, concrete, etc? I have my own place now and need to make trellises for dragonfruit and grapes soon.

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1959 on: December 21, 2016, 01:33:07 AM »
Richard, do you know how the UC research do the metal posts? How far down they go, concrete, etc? I have my own place now and need to make trellises for dragonfruit and grapes soon.


I do not know how far down they go, it should not be hard to figure out if I find out how long the posts are.

I am pretty sure, no concrete.


spaugh

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1960 on: December 21, 2016, 02:18:57 AM »
The posts have a tail on them that stabilizes them when you pound them in.  If you get them down 18" they would be rock solid.  I have grape vines like those that are in 1ft deep but they dont hold the weight of a DF plant.  With a 8ft post you can pound them in deep enough to hold a lot of plant.

Im going to try some of these.  They are like the photos above.
 
]http://www.truevalue.com/catalog/product.jsp?productId=624]
« Last Edit: December 21, 2016, 02:23:01 AM by spaugh »

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1961 on: December 21, 2016, 11:13:52 AM »
My next DF trellis is going to be two chain link fence posts in the ground (no concrete) with two chain link fence top rails between them.
One rail will be 5 1/2 - 6 feet high, the other rail 2 - 3 feet high. Unless I find something better, the "fence" material between the posts and rails will be 6" x 6" welded wire mesh used to reinforce concrete. The plants will be in pots.
I may try something like this:
Deco Grid 4 ft. x 6 ft. Steel Black Fence Panel
http://www.homedepot.com/p/FORGERIGHT-Deco-Grid-4-ft-x-6-ft-Steel-Black-Fence-Panel-862217/300208607?cm_mmc=Shopping%7CTHD%7CG%7C0%7CG-BASE-PLA-D21-Fencing%7C&gclid=CjwKEAiA7ejCBRDlp8uF6ezPnjoSJAAPED7MXQrDMLXEp7WEq_pcw094_JVRKCX1-IQlzzFhI6RIzhoCYSXw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

fyliu

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1962 on: December 21, 2016, 11:50:56 PM »
Thanks. I think I need to put mine a little deeper. Due to sand(DG?) here, I can push a shovel head into the ground with little effort. I should probably keep pounding until it gives a certain amount of resistance. Guess I can always redo it in a few years if it fails and learn something.

RobPatterson

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1963 on: December 31, 2016, 11:08:07 AM »
Also, weather conditions can factor into what you use for posts. The UC photos shown are of very heavily pruned plants. If those get fuller, weight is going to be an issue, unless theyre keeping them thin full time, since theyre research plants, not crop producing. But in California, you also have to factor in wind. Heavy Santa Ana winds would bend those posts if the plants became more widespread and fuller, so that's something to consider. My 'post' of choice is still pressure treated lumber, coated with tar or sealant for the underground sections, and then wrapped in burlap. The 4x4 allows you to nail cross posts or wire to the sides, is thick enough to drill out holes through the wood without compromising the strength, and since its wood, you can more easily attach angle posts if necessary. Its not 'THE' way to go, but I find that it works best for my needs. A lot of this is more based on where you are, what space you have and the conditions youre planting in.

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1964 on: December 31, 2016, 01:12:56 PM »
Also, weather conditions can factor into what you use for posts. The UC photos shown are of very heavily pruned plants. If those get fuller, weight is going to be an issue, unless theyre keeping them thin full time, since theyre research plants, not crop producing. But in California, you also have to factor in wind. Heavy Santa Ana winds would bend those posts if the plants became more widespread and fuller, so that's something to consider. My 'post' of choice is still pressure treated lumber, coated with tar or sealant for the underground sections, and then wrapped in burlap. The 4x4 allows you to nail cross posts or wire to the sides, is thick enough to drill out holes through the wood without compromising the strength, and since its wood, you can more easily attach angle posts if necessary. Its not 'THE' way to go, but I find that it works best for my needs. A lot of this is more based on where you are, what space you have and the conditions youre planting in.

I think the UC research is primarily research for Dragon Fruit crop producing.

They are in the process of moving their water, shade, fertilizer Dragon Fruit research from MVP Farms to the Hansen Agriculture and Research Center site.  The rumor is to better control the water usage and lost of fruit (picked).

Boshi

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1965 on: January 31, 2017, 06:21:32 AM »
While my dragonfruit stems are overwintering, I noticed one of the top cuttings got cold damage, which I managed to make a top cutting of. But then I also noticed these weird discoloured spots also has appeared? Is this only because of the humidity, or should I remove them asap? Or is it something I could remove with home remedials? since most gardening shops are closed at this time of the season 'w'




NateTheGreat

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1966 on: January 31, 2017, 09:26:29 AM »
While my dragonfruit stems are overwintering, I noticed one of the top cuttings got cold damage, which I managed to make a top cutting of. But then I also noticed these weird discoloured spots also has appeared? Is this only because of the humidity, or should I remove them asap? Or is it something I could remove with home remedials? since most gardening shops are closed at this time of the season 'w'

I'm not an expert, but in my experience: healthy plants can fight off diseases like that, but during winter semi-dormancy their immune system (or whatever plants have) isn't very active. Monitor it and if the infected area seems to be growing/worsening, cut those sections off.

Boshi

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1967 on: January 31, 2017, 11:31:01 AM »
While my dragonfruit stems are overwintering, I noticed one of the top cuttings got cold damage, which I managed to make a top cutting of. But then I also noticed these weird discoloured spots also has appeared? Is this only because of the humidity, or should I remove them asap? Or is it something I could remove with home remedials? since most gardening shops are closed at this time of the season 'w'

I'm not an expert, but in my experience: healthy plants can fight off diseases like that, but during winter semi-dormancy their immune system (or whatever plants have) isn't very active. Monitor it and if the infected area seems to be growing/worsening, cut those sections off.

Thanks for the advice, I'll continue monitoring them then. Good thing the warm weather should arrive in a month or 2

FruitAddict

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1968 on: February 02, 2017, 03:16:50 PM »
Hi all.  What characteristics do I need to look for in my dragon fruit plant to determine what variety it is?  Or will someone be able to help me identify it if I post some pictures?  Thanks

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1969 on: February 03, 2017, 12:22:19 AM »
Hi all.  What characteristics do I need to look for in my dragon fruit plant to determine what variety it is?  Or will someone be able to help me identify it if I post some pictures?  Thanks

It is my opinion that you can only guess what variety it is.

Post pictures of the fruit and plant.

RobPatterson

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1970 on: February 03, 2017, 09:15:26 PM »
We can narrow down some specifics if you provide clear pictures of mature and new growth. Color and the appearance of the thorns (and their spacing) can often determine the sub-class of the plants. So please, post some pictures and maybe we can help you narrow things down.

FruitAddict

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1971 on: February 04, 2017, 01:30:52 PM »
Thank you for your help.  This is the second season we have fruit.  Last year the second batch of fruit was a little bit smaller than the first.  We had two batches of fruit.  This season it is pumping flowers and fruit like mad. ;D  Every second week or so there are new flowers.  One evening there was so many flowers open, that the bees smelled it.  They had a ball of a time!!  Later that night when we wanted to pollinate the flowers, there was absolutely no pollen for us to work with.  Well, they are all growing into beautiful fruit.  The fruit is white on the inside and the flower is also white/yellow.  Here are a few pictures.  Please let me know if you need any more photos.














RobPatterson

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1972 on: February 17, 2017, 11:06:23 AM »
That looks like a traditional 'Vietnamese' white variety. You can usually tell white plants, even when they aren't fruiting, by the brown 'corking' of the skin along the edges of the branch tips. How is the flavor of the fruit? Is it sweet with not much secondary characteristics, what I call a 'rock candy' type of fruit (all sugar, no substance) or does it have a bit of a floral taste to it, like someone close to you wearing to much perfume? Some of the heirloom white plants have a milky, semi-translucent flesh (not solid paper white) and they tend to be low in sugar and retain more of the parent flower's characteristic taste. BUt there are a few whites out there that have been produced that are showing a nice mix of flavor and sweetness.
As a serving tip on whites, try cubing up some fruit and adding a dash of lime juice on top before eating. This can really bring out the flavor in some varieties.

Rannman

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1973 on: February 24, 2017, 04:42:16 AM »
Do any Dragonfruit growers have any experience with small black ants damaging their plants and flowers? I have recently moved locations and this is the first summer growing in this area. I have what could be considered a plague of small black ants that attack any new flower buds as well as any exposed area of stem, such as where a stem splits due to excess watering or swelling from flowering. The ants chew off the small petals on new flower but rarely stop the flower developing, and any splits in the stem, they start chewing the flesh away inside the split. I assume they are after the sweet sap that is excreted in these areas but I have also lost a few fruit that ants have burrowed into and eaten from the inside until empty. Any suggestions?

ricshaw

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Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #1974 on: February 24, 2017, 01:38:26 PM »
Do any Dragonfruit growers have any experience with small black ants damaging their plants and flowers? I have recently moved locations and this is the first summer growing in this area. I have what could be considered a plague of small black ants that attack any new flower buds as well as any exposed area of stem, such as where a stem splits due to excess watering or swelling from flowering. The ants chew off the small petals on new flower but rarely stop the flower developing, and any splits in the stem, they start chewing the flesh away inside the split. I assume they are after the sweet sap that is excreted in these areas but I have also lost a few fruit that ants have burrowed into and eaten from the inside until empty. Any suggestions?


I know most Dragon Fruit growers do not like using pesticides.  But sometimes I feel you need to declare total war on ants.

When that happens I use pyrethrin, SEE: http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/pyrethrins.pdf.

 

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