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Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 4170 times)

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #100 on: July 17, 2017, 01:20:46 PM »
I believe Walter Anderson Nursery in Poway has that but call them to make sure. I wouldn't use that on young trees however because they need Nitrogen to grow. Nitrogen is also utilized by plants when flowering and fruiting but it is rarely mentioned.

Simon

Clay

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #101 on: July 17, 2017, 01:32:09 PM »
Thanks Simon! The trees have been in the ground two years now. I'm targeting to let them fruit next year. They are growing like crazy right now; new shoots coming out everywhere.  I'll probably give them one more application of Citrus and Avocado fertilizer, but around October I was thinking of giving them some SOP before they start to bloom in the Winter. Are they still too young for that?

Clay
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simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #102 on: July 17, 2017, 04:24:14 PM »
I would personally not let a two year old tree fruit, even if it was planted as a 7 gallon but the decision is ultimately the growers choice because only you have an idea how you want your tree to grow and produce.

My best friend allows his young trees to fruit against my advice because he wants to purposefully stunt his trees as he does not want them to grow too large. Unfortunately, allowing young unestablished trees to fruit also weakens them and opens them up to disease.

I would much rather wait and have a large established tree producing lots of fruit year after year than allowing a young tree produce 1-5 ok fruit the second year and get stunted growth or possibly a weakened or dead tree in the following years.

Simon

shinzo

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #103 on: July 17, 2017, 04:41:38 PM »
I would personally not let a two year old tree fruit, even if it was planted as a 7 gallon but the decision is ultimately the growers choice because only you have an idea how you want your tree to grow and produce.

My best friend allows his young trees to fruit against my advice because he wants to purposefully stunt his trees as he does not want them to grow too large. Unfortunately, allowing young unestablished trees to fruit also weakens them and opens them up to disease.

I would much rather wait and have a large established tree producing lots of fruit year after year than allowing a young tree produce 1-5 ok fruit the second year and get stunted growth or possibly a weakened or dead tree in the following years.

Simon
Dr. Campbell speaks about this point in the last video you shared in the other thread, he was talking about a fine line that separate dwarfing and stunting.

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #104 on: July 17, 2017, 04:51:22 PM »
I believe Walter Anderson Nursery in Poway has that but call them to make sure. I wouldn't use that on young trees however because they need Nitrogen to grow. Nitrogen is also utilized by plants when flowering and fruiting but it is rarely mentioned.

Simon

Yes they do have it.  I use it on my hibiscus plants along with other more well balanced fertilizers.  I would probably try grow power flower and bloom 3-12-12 on the mango trees instead of hitting it with 0 0 50 if you are looking for less nitrogen and want to promote bloom/fruit. 

I use the grow power 8 6 8 on my fruit trees and use the flower bloom  3 12 12 on my flowering plants and vegetables/berries/watermelons. 

 

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