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Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 4179 times)

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #50 on: June 10, 2017, 10:43:17 AM »
I believe you ;)

Hana321

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #51 on: June 10, 2017, 11:38:13 AM »


Mature mango trees in so cal.





JF

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #52 on: June 10, 2017, 01:04:30 PM »
Those are very nice young trees but far From being mature
We appreciate your experience but growing and fruiting mangos in SoCal is doable but not easy like iin south Florida. Use the forum search you might learn something

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=20139.msg248968#msg248968

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?PHPSESSID=ec41f3e9f458cb3da79449b77dc4cc4e&topic=2992.
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=1835.msg25169#msg25169








Hana321

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #53 on: June 10, 2017, 01:16:37 PM »
My trees are young still. I have a neighbor that has a really mature tree heavily loaded. If i can get a pic. I will post it.

Hana321

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #54 on: June 10, 2017, 01:31:30 PM »
I will check out the link

Hana321

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #55 on: June 10, 2017, 07:38:04 PM »


Neighbor's much older tree


spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #56 on: June 10, 2017, 09:30:05 PM »
I put in 5 trees last fall.  They all made it through winter and are just now starting to flush.  But a few of them just keep blooming over and over.  One of them which was very small set about 30 fruits.  I plucked them all off.  But the trees keep blooming.  Anything I can do to make them do vegetative flushes?

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #57 on: June 11, 2017, 01:42:38 AM »


Neighbor's much older tree

Hana, beautiful tree your neighbor has, it looks like a seedling tree which seems to grow much better than grafted trees.

Spaugh, there's not much we can do besides building a greenhouse or some other means of keeping them warm in order to inhibit flowering. There are probably hormones or chemicals that can swing the balance towards a vegetative flush but I can't recall any at the moment.

If you take care of your trees and let them establish a bit before fruiting, you can still have a productive tree although it may need staking and it may take a while for it to gain some real size.

Simon

AnnonaMangoLord45

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #58 on: June 11, 2017, 02:11:24 AM »
I heard from a guy who grew florida mangoes in California to pluck off the fruits after they get to the size of a large lima bean, then it thinks it's done fruiting for the year. I tried it myself and even in cold weather, the mangoes don't seem to be putting out new flowers, rather, a heck more leaf growth has pushed out!

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #59 on: June 11, 2017, 08:30:19 AM »
Sometimes you just get lucky. I recently removed some blooms from my trees and most my trees are re blooming. Wether or not they bloom again is based on a large part to the weather. If average temps are below about 60F, there is a strong chance the next push is floral. I removed many small mangos that were about marble sized and my tree is re blooming.

I linked an article on blooming in the first page of this thread.

Simon

AnnonaMangoLord45

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #60 on: June 11, 2017, 09:51:30 AM »
Simon, interesting, It seems that 3 centimeters is an appropriate size cutting off the mangoes to trick them. I used a ruler and measured them at 3 cm before cutting them. Thanks for the info!

JF

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #61 on: June 11, 2017, 12:40:19 PM »
here is my Edward, Edgar, Gary, Parson,Providence, Jegenghir and Duncan they are loaded with fruits inside outside the canopy the only problem is that they don't have enough room to spreed their wings.














In front there is Calostro with ten grafts of his own.



and Hayse on the east side


Hana321

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #62 on: June 11, 2017, 12:56:23 PM »
Beautiful trees jf

sharkman

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #63 on: June 11, 2017, 02:10:29 PM »
In florida if you give mangoes to much nitrogen they will often push leaves and not flower. You could try giving them higher nitrogen

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #64 on: June 11, 2017, 03:26:13 PM »
Me and a couple other members applied high Nitrogen fertilizers to the ground and via foliar and the mango trees still bloomed.

Simon

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #65 on: June 11, 2017, 04:21:19 PM »
Im putting GRO POWER AVO/CITRUS 8-6-8 on my avocados and cherimoyas.  I will give a small dose to the mangos too and see if they will flush now with the summer heat and some food. 

Greg A

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #66 on: June 11, 2017, 04:40:52 PM »
Hana, I was wondering about your summer irrigation. What's that like?

Spaugh, My young Keitt also keeps blooming and not flushing vegetatively. I stripped the fruitset. I have never fertilized the tree in any way.

Guys, I think growing mangos in southern California is easier than we think; we're just prone to over-thinking it. That's why we participate in this discussion. I know of many mature mangos throughout our region grown by people who don't give their trees great attention. I'm starting to think that the key element is patience.
gregalder.com/yardposts/

Hana321

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #67 on: June 11, 2017, 05:06:57 PM »
Hana, I was wondering about your summer irrigation. What's that like?


Spaugh, My young Keitt also keeps blooming and not flushing vegetatively. I stripped the fruitset. I have never fertilized the tree in any way.

Guys, I think growing mangos in southern California is easier than we think; we're just prone to over-thinking it. That's why we participate in this discussion. I know of many mature mangos throughout our region grown by people who don't give their trees great attention. I'm starting to think that the key element is patience.
The two grounded mango trees i have are in my lawn area, so they are irrigated year round by the sprinklers. I usually run the sprinklers 5-6 minutes 3x per day, 7 days a week during the hot time of the year. July and August temps are commonl in the one hundred teens. The smaller tree, my dwarf, is on a slight slope, so i typically take the hose out there, and give that tree a bit of extra water. Other than that, my trees are not given any special treatments. My trees typically explode in blooms starting in like February. Typically, the trees lose 95 percent of the flowers. I read somewhere that the mango tree will only keep what it can afford to grow. We also have some pretty good winds in the spring which typically kill off more of the flowers also. Mangoes love warm weather, so any place that does not get good warm summers, and mild winters will find mangoes challenging. Also, areas like Palm Springs where high winds are frequent may also find mangoes challenging. But in reality, i dont really believe that mango trees are as difficult as some tropical/subtropical plants.

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #68 on: June 11, 2017, 06:42:12 PM »
Hana, I was wondering about your summer irrigation. What's that like?

Spaugh, My young Keitt also keeps blooming and not flushing vegetatively. I stripped the fruitset. I have never fertilized the tree in any way.

Guys, I think growing mangos in southern California is easier than we think; we're just prone to over-thinking it. That's why we participate in this discussion. I know of many mature mangos throughout our region grown by people who don't give their trees great attention. I'm starting to think that the key element is patience.

My neighbor who is over on the north side of the hill here has 3 or 4 mature mango trees.  They gave us a mango pie several months ago.  They have quite an impressive fruit orchard over there.  So I know my trees should make it, just need to be patient like you said.  Good things come to those who wait.

sharkman

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #69 on: June 11, 2017, 06:54:50 PM »
Im putting GRO POWER AVO/CITRUS 8-6-8 on my avocados and cherimoyas.  I will give a small dose to the mangos too and see if they will flush now with the summer heat and some food.

The "P", middle one, is to high if you don't want blooms. Try something like 10-0-9 or anything high in "N" and low in "P"

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #70 on: June 11, 2017, 07:08:24 PM »
Hana, I was wondering about your summer irrigation. What's that like?

Spaugh, My young Keitt also keeps blooming and not flushing vegetatively. I stripped the fruitset. I have never fertilized the tree in any way.

Guys, I think growing mangos in southern California is easier than we think; we're just prone to over-thinking it. That's why we participate in this discussion. I know of many mature mangos throughout our region grown by people who don't give their trees great attention. I'm starting to think that the key element is patience.


Many of the Grafted mango trees available are on a rootstock that does not perform very well here. Seedling mangos are relatively easy to grow, especially if they were directly planted into the ground. Because many new mango growers are unaware of Grafted named varieties, they plant seeds from fruit they ate. The seedlings grow well because they are not grafted and will not go through the rigors and energy drain of flowering at a young age. Instead, all the energy is utilized in spreading out its roots and shoots, enabling it to get established faster than a grafted tree.

This is why I am promoting the planting of seedlings, especially those from polyembryonic varieties because these polyembryonic seedlings should produce similar quality fruit if the clone is selected for per my instructions above utilizing the smell of the crushed leaves.

The Margot Mango I posted about is just one such example.
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=21350.msg261001#msg261001

Simon

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #71 on: June 11, 2017, 07:43:53 PM »
Im putting GRO POWER AVO/CITRUS 8-6-8 on my avocados and cherimoyas.  I will give a small dose to the mangos too and see if they will flush now with the summer heat and some food.

The "P", middle one, is to high if you don't want blooms. Try something like 10-0-9 or anything high in "N" and low in "P"

Ok, I will hit it will some disolved 21-0-20 amonium sulfate + SUL PO MAG

The soil and water are alkaline and need some PH down anyway.  I wont get too carried away with fertilizers but surely they can use a small dose. 
« Last Edit: June 11, 2017, 07:47:25 PM by spaugh »

EvilFruit

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #72 on: June 15, 2017, 07:05:17 PM »
Here is a picture of a mango tree (flowering) in Wakan Village in Oman. Wakan village is located  at about 2000m above the sea level near Jabel Al akdar (green mountain).



Peach tree from the same place


Moh'd

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #73 on: June 16, 2017, 11:32:43 AM »
Evilfruit, thanks for the picture of the Mango tree. Is that a seedling? It's even cooler because there's also peaches growing in the same area. I hope the fruit from that tree is tasty.

Simon

AnnonaMangoLord45

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #74 on: June 16, 2017, 12:10:28 PM »
Hey, I learned from the Laguna Hills Nursery Owner that he paints his mango trees like an avocado. Maybe the reason why turpentine rootstocked mangoes have extreme dieback is that as the leaves droop and die, it exposes the tree branches and bark to sun, cooking it alive. Starting to think mangoes are extremely like avocado trees

 

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