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Author Topic: Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???  (Read 564 times)

Zafra

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Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???
« on: June 21, 2017, 11:08:55 AM »
Not long ago this little guy was healthy. Then it started yellowing, then curling, now it's got the brown spots and all of the above. It's definitely deteriorating.  :'( What does it have and can anything be done? Thanks in advance...







Millet

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Re: Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2017, 12:16:13 PM »
What medium is the tree planted in?  What are you fertilizing with, it has symptoms of a potassium deficiency.  How often do you fertilize the tree? Lastly have you checked the root system.?

Zafra

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Re: Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2017, 12:22:25 PM »
It's in whatever I had at the time I really don't remember. It's right next to two seedling mandarins (it's on rootstock of the same seedling mandarin) which are in the same soil (I planted them at the same time) and they're beautiful - not suffering any of the symptoms of the Meyer. I haven't been fertilizing except for foliar spray and occasional doses of pee :). I haven't checked the roots because with it looking so weak I didn't want to disturb it further - does it have symptoms of a root condition/disease?

laidbackdood

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Re: Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2017, 04:08:23 AM »
Thats eaxactly what i thought(same as millet).......the curling inward leaves indicate pottassium defiency and the pale leaves look like wet feet.......I have killed many trees via "wet feet"........
Take it out ......clear away a lot of the mix......get some fresh free draining Good quality potting mix suitable for trees(this is your reason for failure) and put it in a terracotta pot.......Dont over water ! .....let the mix dry out a bit between waterings.......the terracotta will dry the mix from the outside in and the roots can breathe..........My summer temps get to 40 plus C  and i dont have any probs with terracotta......get a moisture meter or.........once you have transplanted your tree into the new pot with new mix.......lift the pot up and feel the weight........then water it in and lift the pot up then......that is the difference....water when the pot feels light again......and not before.....I always drill extra drainage holes with masonary bits......4mm then 6mm then 10mm in stages ...so you dont crack pot......then line bottom of pot with a piece of onion bag cut to the size(circle)......that will stop mix washing out of pot and keep insects out to a certain degree.....do not put gravel/stones or broken crock on the bottom of pot to improve drainage because it DOESNT improve drainage......it makes it worse......water tree in with seaweed/water and keep in shade for a week or two..........Dont feed at all.......until you see new top growth.......You need to get the roots going.....when they are happy......the top will show you their appreciation ! Then feed with liquid feed at half the rate every two weeks ....Needs to be high in nitrogen with an NPK close to 5 to 1 to 3 as citrus absorb nutrienst in this ratio(i learnt that of millet !) ...Good luck.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 04:13:38 AM by laidbackdood »

Millet

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Re: Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2017, 02:57:10 PM »
Since you pee into your tree's pot, when you do as Laiedbackdood advised, where gloves.

Zafra

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Re: Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2017, 02:19:12 PM »
Nothing in my pee I'd need to protect myself from.  https://www.thoughtco.com/the-chemical-composition-of-urine-603883
Wet feet is a real possibility. It's the rainy season and the deterioration definitely accelerated when there were many days of heavy rains. But my question is why aren't the mandarin seedlings suffering similarly, since the roots are the same for all 3 and wet feet would be a root problem.
I'm going to go ahead and change the substrate to something lighter, and keep up the feeding. Fingers crossed. Thanks!

citrange

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Re: Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2017, 04:34:55 AM »
http://postimg.org/image/bw4755hw3/
If you look carefully at the stem of this plant you will see that the original graft is poor, with only about half of the diameter of rootstock and scion connected. This won't help the overall condition.
There is also a small shoot appearing from the rootstock which should be rubbed off. I would also remove what appears to be the remains of a label, and all the leaf debris in the pot.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 04:36:59 AM by citrange »

spaugh

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Re: Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2017, 07:12:27 PM »
Since you pee into your tree's pot, when you do as Laiedbackdood advised, where gloves.

Just curious why to wear gloves when peeing on your tree?  Not that I would pee on a small potted tree.  Isnt urine full of salt. 

Zafra

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Re: Help! can this baby Meyer be saved???
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2017, 04:35:36 PM »
There's plenty on the nets about this, but here's one: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/human-urine-is-an-effective-fertilizer/ "Urine is chock full of nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus, which are the nutrients plants need to thrive—and the main ingredients in common mineral fertilizers. There is, of course, a steady supply of this man-made plant food: an adult on a typical Western diet urinates about 500 liters a year, enough to fill three standard bathtubs. And despite the gross-out potential, urine is practically sterile when it leaves the body, Heinonen-Tanski pointed out. Unlike feces, which can carry bacteria like salmonella and E. coli, urine poses no health risks—astronauts on the International Space Station even drink the stuff—after it's purified."
This article in Modern Farmer is fun: http://modernfarmer.com/2014/01/human-pee-proven-fertilizer-future/

As for the graft, it's quite good. The callous makes it look funky but here's the graft when it was new:




The label is actually a Tanglefoot band to keep ants/scales away.

The plant lost all its leaves but is finally starting to push some new ones. I'm keeping it out of heavy rains and fertilizing more often, with fingers crossed.

 

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