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Author Topic: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos  (Read 2230 times)

zands

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #50 on: July 17, 2017, 11:29:43 AM »
Only one-dimensional if eaten fully ripe.

I like NDM although it's not my favorite and the flavor can be one dimensional. In good years, it does have a slight floral note and it does taste a bit like nectar to me. I used to suck honeysuckle.

Simon

My dry year NDM of 2015 were the best as they moved into late season. My take for Simon is that with your dry weather there NDM should generally be a complex flavor mango unlike in Florida. But i still like our honey flavor____non complex NDM___same as our watery avocados.

roblack

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #51 on: July 17, 2017, 11:42:16 AM »
 
[/quote]

Gotta stay off those ladders.

Gotta ask yourself, how much your insurance deductible is, and add in the missed work and pain and suffering. Even the expensive pole chainsaws start looking cheap.

simon_grow

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #52 on: July 17, 2017, 01:29:36 PM »
Only one-dimensional if eaten fully ripe.

I like NDM although it's not my favorite and the flavor can be one dimensional. In good years, it does have a slight floral note and it does taste a bit like nectar to me. I used to suck honeysuckle.

Simon

My dry year NDM of 2015 were the best as they moved into late season. My take for Simon is that with your dry weather there NDM should generally be a complex flavor mango unlike in Florida. But i still like our honey flavor____non complex NDM___same as our watery avocados.

Zands, you are right. I harvested a couple NDM from Leo Manuel's tree and they were superb and sugar bombs. There are much stronger tasting mangos out there but the velvety smooth texture and honey sweet flesh is excellent quality non the less.

Simon

Mark in Texas

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #53 on: July 17, 2017, 03:03:32 PM »
Gotta stay off those ladders. Lots of cheap bustard pole chain saws at HEARTLAND-AMERICA website some as low a 64$.  Get the mail in catalog.  Also at Harbor Freight. Lithium battery types and AC connected types.  They are all made in China anyway so pick out your intermediary who is selling. It could be HD, Lowes, Nothern Tools, Harbor Freight and so on

My take is that Harbor Freight is forcing its Chinese manufacturers to upgrade to consistency.  I bought crap 3/8 drill from them five years ago. I do not think it would be crap if I bought it today

Electric pole chain saws ....A major advance in  civilization. They will not be denied.   

Yeah, 2 lower lumbar surgeries which included allografts and implants of 3" screws and rods and a bout with prostate cancer and you quickly realize you're not so tough anymore.

Speaking of Harbor Freight,  in spite of it being cheap I've had excellent wear on tools from there, oldies too.  Am still using a cheap 14 yr. old $12 angle grinder for farm chores. In fact, few days ago propped my tractor's PTO shredder up, crawled on my back and put a knife edge on the two rotary blades with it.  Their bench mounted chain saw sharpener is another gem. You can change the angle, load the chain in reverse, etc.

fruitlovers

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #54 on: July 17, 2017, 06:28:29 PM »
They make battery powered chain saws that compete with the best gas saws in terms of performance. I have a husqy T536Li X that is a game changer. I love that thing and would never consider going back to hand saw. The no powertool mantra is a little extreme.

Ditto, electric pole saw by Green Works, rechargeable battery. Keeps me off ladders and does a great job even on tough oaks.   Still use my Husquavarna gas chain saw.

Gotta stay off those ladders. Lots of cheap bustard pole chain saws at HEARTLAND-AMERICA website some as low a 64$.  Get the mail in catalog.  Also at Harbor Freight. Lithium battery types and AC connected types.  They are all made in China anyway so pick out your intermediary who is selling. It could be HD, Lowes, Nothern Tools, Harbor Freight and so on

My take is that Harbor Freight is forcing its Chinese manufacturers to upgrade to consistency.  I bought crap 3/8 drill from them five years ago. I do not think it would be crap if I bought it today

Electric pole chain saws ....A major advance in  civilization. They will not be denied.   
Electric chain saws are great, and so quiet! Zands didn't you believe everything had to run on fossil fuels to be good? HAHA  Electric wood chipper are next!  :D
Oscar

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #55 on: July 17, 2017, 07:37:48 PM »
Gotta stay off those ladders. Lots of cheap bustard pole chain saws at HEARTLAND-AMERICA website some as low a 64$.  Get the mail in catalog.  Also at Harbor Freight. Lithium battery types and AC connected types.  They are all made in China anyway so pick out your intermediary who is selling. It could be HD, Lowes, Nothern Tools, Harbor Freight and so on

My take is that Harbor Freight is forcing its Chinese manufacturers to upgrade to consistency.  I bought crap 3/8 drill from them five years ago. I do not think it would be crap if I bought it today

Electric pole chain saws ....A major advance in  civilization. They will not be denied.   

Yeah, 2 lower lumbar surgeries which included allografts and implants of 3" screws and rods and a bout with prostate cancer and you quickly realize you're not so tough anymore.

Speaking of Harbor Freight,  in spite of it being cheap I've had excellent wear on tools from there, oldies too.  Am still using a cheap 14 yr. old $12 angle grinder for farm chores. In fact, few days ago propped my tractor's PTO shredder up, crawled on my back and put a knife edge on the two rotary blades with it.  Their bench mounted chain saw sharpener is another gem. You can change the angle, load the chain in reverse, etc.

Ive got a 12 amp jack hammer from harbor freight.  I have beat the living snot out of that thing and it just keeps on ticking.  The neighbors borrow it and beat the crap out of it too.  They ran it dry (it takes oil) and it started making noise but kept on working and wuit the sounds after filling the oil.  Awesome tool.  Got their little concrete maker too, those 2 tools are golden and cheap!

zands

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #56 on: July 17, 2017, 08:07:37 PM »
Electric chain saws are great, and so quiet! Zands didn't you believe everything had to run on fossil fuels to be good? HAHA  Electric wood chipper are next!  :D


I use a Troy bilt lawnmower w briggs stratton engine but everything else/garden tools is electric such as chain saws, pole saws, edgers. And I was correct about my Hillary health predictions so you gottta pay up out in Waikiki.

If I had $500 to blow it would be on a Honda twin blade lawnmower  http://powerequipment.honda.com/lawn-mowers/twin-blade-mower-advantage
« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 08:10:02 PM by zands »

fruitlovers

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #57 on: July 18, 2017, 12:14:29 AM »
Electric chain saws are great, and so quiet! Zands didn't you believe everything had to run on fossil fuels to be good? HAHA  Electric wood chipper are next!  :D


I use a Troy bilt lawnmower w briggs stratton engine but everything else/garden tools is electric such as chain saws, pole saws, edgers. And I was correct about my Hillary health predictions so you gottta pay up out in Waikiki.

If I had $500 to blow it would be on a Honda twin blade lawnmower  http://powerequipment.honda.com/lawn-mowers/twin-blade-mower-advantage

You gotta be kidding? Certainly wasn't her health that kept her from becoming president! But i don't want to incur the wrath of the off topic moderators.
Oscar

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #58 on: July 18, 2017, 01:27:55 PM »

I like Dr Richard Campbell and always enjoy watching his videos and listening to his lectures, but I consider him to be somewhat of an eccentric and take his info with a grain of salt.

very interesting point about the desired lack of nitrogen and also the desired lighter green leaves and it's positive effects on the brix index.

I concur.  He does like to talk and his style, experience and enthusiasm could give the impression it is unilaterally correct when latitude is neccesary.  We are all still learning.

zands

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #59 on: July 18, 2017, 08:01:20 PM »

My dry year NDM of 2015 were the best as they moved into late season. My take for Simon is that with your dry weather there NDM should generally be a complex flavor mango unlike in Florida. But i still like our honey flavor____non complex NDM___same as our watery avocados.

Zands, you are right. I harvested a couple NDM from Leo Manuel's tree and they were superb and sugar bombs. There are much stronger tasting mangos out there but the velvety smooth texture and honey sweet flesh is excellent quality non the less.
Simon



Hi Simon
What I was inarticulate in saying was that in 2015 we had dry weather during the months the mangoes were growing. Almost no rain. With these conditions my second half of season of NDM fruits graduated to a complex mango taste. Leaving that honey taste in the dust which I like anyhow. Lots of NDM fans here especially among Jamaican-Americans who come by my place. I am sure it has a reputation in Jamaica by now.

So just thinking that with your dry climate your California NDM should be more on the complex side

JoeP450

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #60 on: July 18, 2017, 08:48:13 PM »
I kinda took it with a grain of salt when I saw the rocks against the tree trunks and the rationale....  🤔🤔🤔🤔🤔 https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=D2MPoqqzwdY

-joep450

simon_grow

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #61 on: July 18, 2017, 10:55:03 PM »
Zands, you are correct, they are quite complex when grown here as long as we don't overwater. They are complex in a manner like Maha Chanok and Edward in that the complexity of flavor profiles is very soft or muted but can be detected by those with a sensitive palate. The floral, honey and slight umami( guava or green Thai mango resin) flavors of NDM commingle in a well balanced manner.

To contrast, there is another type of complexity that is sharp, loud and in your face. Lemon Zest has this in your face complexity that is more than just lemony or orangy. The complexity comes the combination of citrus like limonene flavor combined with the turpenes more commonly found in mangos. The slight chalky taste of a firm ripe Lemon Zest adds depth of character and in this state, much of the sugars seem to be locked into the flesh of the Lemin Zest although the juice is syrupy sweet and thick as well.

Simon

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #62 on: July 18, 2017, 11:05:40 PM »
Hey everyone, I was in the videos linked above and really enjoyed Dr Campbell's hospitality and of course mangoes.

Here's my ranking of what we took home:     Orange sherbet > ceci love > coconut cream > sunrise > ruby > lemon zest > kryptonite > diamond

I agree.  Diamond, while pretty good in my opinion, was not at the same level as the rest of the ones we tried.  My wife ended up refusing them with so many other all-stars in the house. 

I just got another batch of mangoes from Dr C today and will be hosting a tasting this weekend.  Check out "What's Ripening Florida?" on Facebook.  Should be fun!

All I can say is don't eat an OS before you eat any standard mango.  It's just not fair...  :)

-Matt
What's Ripening Florida?

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #63 on: July 18, 2017, 11:12:06 PM »
Hey everyone, I was in the videos linked above and really enjoyed Dr Campbell's hospitality and of course mangoes.

Here's my ranking of what we took home:     Orange sherbet > ceci love > coconut cream > sunrise > ruby > lemon zest > kryptonite > diamond

I agree.  Diamond, while pretty good in my opinion, was not at the same level as the rest of the ones we tried.  My wife ended up refusing them with so many other all-stars in the house. 

I just got another batch of mangoes from Dr C today and will be hosting a tasting this weekend.  Check out "What's Ripening Florida?" on Facebook.  Should be fun!

All I can say is don't eat an OS before you eat any standard mango.  It's just not fair...  :)

Hey Matt, thanks for the report! Can you give any details about Kryptonite? I recall reading about it last year or the year before and someone had it on their top ten list. Did it have that typical tropical mango flavor or was their some specific noticeable flavor component.

How would you compare Orange Sherbet and Lemon Zest.

Simon

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #64 on: July 19, 2017, 12:09:34 AM »
I don't remember a distinct flavor in the Kryptonite though it could be from mango overload.  I just remember it was very good, no fiber, etc.

I preferred the Orange Sherbet over the Lemon Zest this time but my memory of LZ from Pine Island last year trumps them both.  I think the heavy rains may have washed LZ out a bit more.  Pete (from the video) got more LZ this weekend from Dr C and reported to me that they were way better this time...

I will be sampling both again in a few days.
-Matt
What's Ripening Florida?

Mark in Texas

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #65 on: July 19, 2017, 09:21:50 AM »
Nice videos Matt, thanks!

You folks now have me scared about my watering drills.  Heat is ramping up in the greenhouse to highs of 98F daily so I've been compensating with increased watering.  Watered the Sweet Tart and Lemon Zest yesterday for example and expect to start harvesting (for the first time) fruit from both in about 2 weeks.

Where's my happy medium here between tree health and fruit complexity regarding watering?  Are mangos drought tolerant?  I wouldn't know as my trees are not subject to Mother Nature's dry spells.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2017, 09:24:44 AM by Mark in Texas »

gatoreece

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #66 on: July 19, 2017, 12:40:54 PM »
I'm curious to hear your results Mark in Texas.  Mangoes don't all seem to wash out, but definitely had a few disappointments this year.  I'm not sure if the over watering is more detrimental right before harvest or during other stages of development.  Maybe start a new thread with your results, especially if you have previous experience with those varieties to compare with.  I love sweet tart too!

I've seen great jackfruit turn almost inedible with heavy rains... 


UPDATE: just tried an OS and a LZ side by side from Dr Campbell (latest batch) and LZ wins it for me(barely).  They definitely tasted a little different to me.  I love that "lemony orange crush soda" flavor if the LZ.   Could be differing ripeness stages.  I enjoy PPK and LZ a little under ripe.  The OS may have been a little past prime if it ripens the same way.
-Matt
What's Ripening Florida?

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #67 on: July 19, 2017, 12:42:16 PM »
My mangoes never get watered, just heavy mulch and even young trees made it through this past drought with no issues.
-Matt
What's Ripening Florida?

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #68 on: July 19, 2017, 04:22:38 PM »
I'm curious to hear your results Mark in Texas.  Mangoes don't all seem to wash out, but definitely had a few disappointments this year.  I'm not sure if the over watering is more detrimental right before harvest or during other stages of development.  Maybe start a new thread with your results, especially if you have previous experience with those varieties to compare with.  I love sweet tart too!

I've seen great jackfruit turn almost inedible with heavy rains... 


UPDATE: just tried an OS and a LZ side by side from Dr Campbell (latest batch) and LZ wins it for me(barely).  They definitely tasted a little different to me.  I love that "lemony orange crush soda" flavor if the LZ.   Could be differing ripeness stages.  I enjoy PPK and LZ a little under ripe.  The OS may have been a little past prime if it ripens the same way.

I don't think you can match with hand watering, what mother nature gave us about a month ago. 2 weeks of solid rain, every day, all day.  I don't think you need to worry about creating the washed out flavor in the mangoes even with some aggressive manual watering.  We just can't match that complete deluge that we received.  I am a little more in the central Florida area and our season is a lot later than the season in South Florida, so my mangoes had lots of time to acclimate back to normal conditions.  So the mangoes that I am harvesting now show no signs of the washed out taste experienced by others several weeks ago.

fruitlovers

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #69 on: July 19, 2017, 08:20:12 PM »
Rainfall has a big impact on quality of fruit. But other factors are involved: like soil type, soil drainage, how spread out the rain is over the year, how accustomed plants are to rain.
If lots of rain ruined quality of jackfruit then we would never have good jackfruits, and they are excellent here. Ditto for mango. A bigger associated problem for the mango with the rain is anthracnose. Much bigger problem here than washed out tasting fruit. Lately we are also getting a fungus that grows on exterior of the jackfruits and splits the fruits. I'm sure the heavy rainfall helps to cultivate that fungal disease.
Oscar

Mark in Texas

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #70 on: July 21, 2017, 08:51:11 AM »
Texas has its own challenges, so does Florida.  You folks have certainly had your share of rain!

Since I try to mimic the plant material's natural environment perhaps the question should be what kind of weather is atypical during the fruiting stage up to harvest in indigenous places like India, Caribbean, Mexico, Hawaii.  I remember seeing a lot of huge wild trees on the wet side of the islands, not many on the dry side.

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #71 on: July 21, 2017, 10:27:39 AM »
Mark, in India Monsoon doesn't hit until early June in South, by this this time mango season is over, and it hits north late June to mid July and by this time North mango season is over. In other words, from bloom to harvest Indian mangoes in most part do not get rain which makes the flavor exceptional.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Dr. Richard Campbell's orchard and some of his favorite mangos
« Reply #72 on: July 21, 2017, 11:02:58 AM »
In other words, from bloom to harvest Indian mangoes in most part do not get rain which makes the flavor exceptional.

Thanks Behl.  Be interesting to not water and see.  I know if you apply a lot of water to other fruiting trees like peach, grapes or even citrus it does tend to water the flavor down.

 

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