Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Millet

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 93
1
Fyliu, your correct the heat treatment does not permanently cure the tree, rather it greatly reduces the disease in the tree temperately. The heat treatment will need to be done again and again.

2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Root stock quality??
« on: November 13, 2017, 10:01:30 AM »
cowboy, that is good information. Thanks for bringing it to our attention.

3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Warm Water For Winter Greenhouse Irrigation
« on: November 12, 2017, 03:45:35 PM »
I conducted an experiment today.  I placed a pail of rain water that was collected from the 55-gallon drums outside, and moved it into the greenhouse, but in an area where it received no sunlight.  When the water was bought into the greenhouse this morning the water temperature was 38-F.  At 1:15-PM the black pails setting in the sun along the inside greenhouse south wall had a temperature of 74-F. and the pail that received no sunlight, but only some residual internal greenhouse heat was 57-F.

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Root stock quality??
« on: November 12, 2017, 03:01:30 PM »
Who told you that Carrizo citrange is not a good root stock for Meiwa?  A Carrizo/Meiwa graft should do well, and C-35 citrange should do well also.  Carrizo will produce a larger tree than C-35, and also some what larger sized fruit.  All of my Kumquats are growing on Flying Dragon (only because FD is my rootstock of choice).  One frequently hears Kumquats don't do well on their own roots, but I know some people who have them on their own roots, and so far so good, however grafted on trifoliate is the rootstock of choice.

5
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Pomelo - citrus maxima strange leaves
« on: November 12, 2017, 02:21:26 PM »
Looking great.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Root stock quality??
« on: November 12, 2017, 02:16:08 PM »
Volkameriana, a hybrid between lemon and sour range, is a vigorous growing root stock. All vigorous growing root stocks produce fruit of lesser quality. Trifoliate is the root stock of choice for a Meiwa Kumquat.  Volkameriana is OK for trees producing sour tasting fruits, but otherwise it  produces poorer quality fruit. It also produces fruit with lesser quality juice. I certainly would not say that the fruit of your Meiwa will turn out to be bad fruit, just poorer in quality than if the tree was grafted upon trifoliate.  You could certainly air layer layer, or graft onto a different rootstock, or do nothing.  If your really concerned it might be easier to simply purchase a new tree growing on a trifoliate rootstock.

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Warm Water For Winter Greenhouse Irrigation
« on: November 11, 2017, 04:01:40 PM »
Vlad, the greenhouse temperature all depends on the day, and how sunny.  My greenhouse is at an elevation of 5,440-ft so the sunlight is quite strong. On a sunny day the temperature starts out about 45 to 50-F and  can eventually reach anywhere from 60 to 80-F

8
Johnny, the heat treatment has been known for some time now.  There are companies that have heat trucks with tents that unfold off the back of the truck out over two trees at a time.  Stem is released into the tent  to supply the heat to the trees.  These trucks can treat two trees in about  3-5 minutes, and then it moves down the row to the next trees.

9
Citrus General Discussion / Warm Water For Winter Greenhouse Irrigation
« on: November 10, 2017, 08:04:58 PM »
I collect rain/snow water off of two large barns into one hundred 55-gallon open top drums.  At this time of year the collected water is quite cold, some mornings even a little ice. I  painted ten 3.5 gallon plastic pales black, which I fill with the rain water each morning, and set them inside the greenhouse flush against the inside south wall of the greenhouse to absorb the sun's light heating the water.  By noon on sunny days the water is 70 - 80-F. which I then use to water the 10 container tomatoes. citrus trees, pineapples and other plants.  This gives me 35 gallons of warm water every day.

10
Michael, did the tube say how many wasps were in the tube?

11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Kaffir Lime tree assistance
« on: November 08, 2017, 09:56:36 AM »
Sonny is correct on the fruit.  Remove the fruit from the tree.  The tree is in no condition to share it energy trying to develop fruit.  Get a soil thermometer so you can keep track of the temperature of the medium.  Make sure the medium the tree is growing in is FREE draining this allows oxygen to enter the soil, and the CO2 given off by the roots to exit.   Make sure the tree is getting PLENTY light. Lastly, raise the medium/root zone's temperature up to 70-F (21C) and keep it there 

12
Citrus General Discussion / Re: First-ever soil-less finger lime crop
« on: November 07, 2017, 05:27:21 PM »
Very interesting post.  I noticed the grapes are growing in what loos like 2 gallon containers.  It looks like the water/fertilizer flows through the containers and out the bottom then down the holes in the long while collecting runs, then recycled to be used again.

13
Citrus General Discussion / Re: new greenhouse planning
« on: November 07, 2017, 12:20:52 AM »
Yes, I cut the insulation boards to fit exactly in between the frames.  In fact I cut all boards 1/4" longer and wider than the frames, and squeezed them in for a very tight fit.  Being a polyurethane foam product they squeeze down nice and tight, plus I used glue..  Actually polyurethane boards are really very easy to cut.  I use a yard stick and a simple sharp kitchen knife. I did much the same for the back wall, which I put up each night during the winter, and remove each sunny  morning. Doing so greatly helps with the heat bill, which can be high in Colorado.

14
Citrus General Discussion / Re: new greenhouse planning
« on: November 06, 2017, 03:19:33 PM »
brian, no there is no space between my insulation boards and the glazing.  The insulation boards are attached directly to the north wall glazing.  I sealed the instillation board seams with the silver sided tape.

15
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Please help calamansi is dying :(
« on: November 06, 2017, 10:01:58 AM »
Great, happy for you and your tree.

16
Citrus General Discussion / Re: new greenhouse planning
« on: November 05, 2017, 06:22:09 PM »
 The exterior of the north wall on my greenhouse is glazing.  I put silver sided polyurethane insulation boards (4X8 2" thick) attached to the glazing on the inside north wall.  I guess it has been up maybe 15+ years with zero problems.  No mold, no nothing. However I live in a semi-arid area, but of course the humidity inside the GH is always high.  I also painted the silver insulation boards white, because white reflects sun light ever greater than silver.

17
Citrus General Discussion / Re: new greenhouse planning
« on: November 05, 2017, 02:26:06 PM »
Brian, are you planning on having a solid wall on the greenhouse's north end?  North walls of a greenhouse lose light to the outside.   A solid insulated north wall painted white on the inside does not allow the light to pass through as it would if it was glazing, but reflects the light back into the greenhouse giving more light and heat to the plants, (and the heat bill goes down).   Again great job.

18
Citrus General Discussion / Re: new greenhouse planning
« on: November 04, 2017, 11:13:59 AM »
Brian your in the wrong profession.  You should have been in the greenhouse building business. 

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: new greenhouse planning
« on: November 03, 2017, 08:54:52 PM »
Mark, yes the columns. I also have a Nexus greenhouse.  I have not seen any rust, and the greenhouse was constructed about 20 years ago.

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: new greenhouse planning
« on: November 03, 2017, 10:43:45 AM »
Brian, it was a good decision to put in a deep concrete foundation.  When we built my greenhouse we only concreted each perlin in the ground, and insured that the polycarbonate sides went several inches under the soil .   Because of the cold outside temperature during the winter, and the warm climate inside, mice and other animals dig under the side wall to get inside.  Several times a winter I have to add a layer of dirt against the outside walls and reseal the animal's tunnels.   

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Pomelo - citrus maxima strange leaves
« on: November 02, 2017, 12:03:52 PM »
Susanne, it would act the same on a container grown tree.  By tip pruning you would get a bushier tree.  I would not cut the central growing leader which is responsible for the height of the tree (If you desire the tree to grow taller).

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Pomelo - citrus maxima strange leaves
« on: November 01, 2017, 09:20:44 PM »
Lory, research has shown that any cut to a young tree reduces root growth.  This is because of the balance between the tree's foliage and it root system. Heavy cuts on a young tree, as frequently happens in some Mediterranean countries, discourages canopy growth and delays trees coming into bearing.   However, if you wish more branching, removing just the end tip of a branch,  which would remove the apical bud .  With the apical bud removed this will allow the buds on the branch just below the cut to produce 2 to 3 new branches.  If you just lightly tip prune you would protect the young tree and get your additional branching.  It is always nice seeing you posting.  Thanks for the update on your pummelo.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Purple new growth???
« on: November 01, 2017, 02:54:04 PM »
It doesn't matter.

25
I seen the story on Harvey's demise last week on the Fresh Fruit site.   I believe the are still offering fruit sales via the Internet.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 93
Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers