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Author Topic: Strawberry Protection Society  (Read 663 times)

AlwaysHotinFL

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Strawberry Protection Society
« on: May 20, 2017, 04:39:31 PM »
So, I know it's a little early to think about strawberries down here in our zones (9b for me), but I wanted to get a jump on the prep for the red-berried wonders.

Specifically, I've been looking over the forum about ways to hang/protect from ants and bugs mostly but birds too maybe. So, how do you muscle out the would be intruders vandalizing and committing grand theft in your strawberry plants. Keep em elevated? Special enclosure? Etc...
-Casey

fyliu

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2017, 06:20:44 PM »
I use bird netting around 3 15 gal pots where I grow 3 of them each, with a 1 gal pot on top with 1 plant each for a terraced planting.

I heard people say that making stone strawberries will teach the birds to ignore them. Look up youtube videos and DIY guides.

cfinley

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2017, 06:48:17 AM »
If you have the means to grow them off the ground, that helps a lot. I did the topsy turvy hanging growers for strawberries, peppers & tomatoes, and the only bug problem I had was some aphids on the pepper trunks. Birds weren't really a problem since the strawberries grew out the sides, and there wasnt really anything sturdy they could land on close enough to eat the berries. The problem with those topsy turvy containers is they need frequent watering or they dry out in the summer breeze, and the plastic fabric they're made from only lasts about a year in the sun before it crumbles away.

AlwaysHotinFL

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2017, 05:40:29 AM »
Was thinking about the topsy turvy, but have heard the same thing, that they're flimsy-and that you can't fit much. I was wondering actually about this on Amazon, and elevating it like they have in the last picture.

https://www.amazon.com/Mr-Stacky-5-Tier-Strawberry-Planter/dp/B00A3HFNNE



-Casey

fyliu

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2017, 07:20:30 PM »
I heard that the tiered containers doesn't actually do as well as advertised. Strawberries don't do well in the shady side. Maybe if you grew herb on that side they'd be okay.

cfinley

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2017, 11:03:09 AM »
The Topsy Turvy Strawberry tower holds 15 plants, they come out the sides as opposed to the bottom like the tomato one. Yeah, shaded side wasnt very productive, although I was able to overcome that somewhat by rotating them a little every day or two. Anything touching the ground isnt going to stop ants, snails, etc.

AlwaysHotinFL

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2017, 08:52:11 PM »
Good insight, thanks!
-Casey

Donkeys4hire

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2017, 04:21:41 PM »
I would like to try strawberries, where should I begin?

AlwaysHotinFL

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2017, 04:44:33 PM »
I live next to the winter strawberry capital of the country- Plant City. I plan to buy my crowns/roots (bare rooted?) From Parkesdale farmers market, or even on the side of the road in that town. They should start selling in September-October. These are Florida specific varieties, as I think we might be the only part of the country that grows them in winter, and northern varieties crash and burn in FL. They sell them by the dozen I think for pretty cheap. Plant at the level of the crown, water, grow. Fruit from Nov to April.

Strawberries attract lots of pests - hence the reason for this topic. They are the #1 most pesticide filled fruit in the market (https://www.ewg.org/foodnews/dirty_dozen_list.php). Commercial growers plant them in rows with black plastic impregnated with pesticides/herbicides covering them to prevent more weeds/pests. This also prevents them from sending out lots of runners that can compromise fruit production. Growing them as an annual in FL leads to best fruit production.

At home though you can plant in raised beds, pots or hanging pots to ameliorate many of these problems.

This article is helpful, though still written with more of a traditional style growing in mind:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs403
-Casey

nattyfroootz

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2017, 12:51:26 PM »
Just started growing strawberries in the ground this year. I have them intermixed with lots of wildflowers. I find many fruits hiding in the crowns of wildflower foliage at peak ripeness. I think being able to have a mix of colors to distract birds as well as having foliage will help in the protection of fruits. I do find some with some peck marks but I haven't lost too many yet.

noochka1

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Re: Strawberry Protection Society
« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2017, 01:40:36 PM »
Is anyone growing strawberries in S. Florida (10b/11)?  I've tried a couple of times and failed miserably.  It doesn't seem like they can tolerate the heat and humidity here.  I'm wondering if I need a specific type or if it's just not possible in this zone.

 

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