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Author Topic: ID of a citrus tree grown from seed  (Read 240 times)

Ynk88

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ID of a citrus tree grown from seed
« on: September 02, 2017, 12:38:53 PM »
Could someone try to identify this citrus tree grown from seed.

Normaly the seed should come from a tiny mandarin that had a good flavor.

But as I was not the one who sowed the seed, I'm not really sure if it really came from a mandarin fruit

The new growth is a bit hairy and the petiole wings go beneath the leaflet blade.

Thanks  :)














Sylvain

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Re: ID of a citrus tree grown from seed
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2017, 12:49:00 PM »
Not a mandarin with these winged petioles. The hairy new growths make me think of a pomelo.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2017, 12:51:25 PM by Sylvain »

Ynk88

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Re: ID of a citrus tree grown from seed
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2017, 05:18:47 PM »
I also thought of a pomelo because of the hairy new growth, but I can't find a picture of a pomelo with petioles that looks like the ones on my tree.

Sylvain

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Re: ID of a citrus tree grown from seed
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2017, 05:23:40 PM »
You are right the petiole has very large wings, that's why I wrote 'make me think of'. I meant I was not sure...

Ynk88

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Re: ID of a citrus tree grown from seed
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2017, 04:00:00 PM »
I understood that you were not sure, i'm also not.

What i'm sure, is that it's not a Citrus hystrix, because we never buyed a kaffir lime fruit, and the leaves don't smell like Citrus hystrix leaves. They have a very faint smell, but I could not describe it.

But if it could be a hybrid with a pomelo and a kaffir lime, how would the leaves smell ? would they have hairs or not ? and would the new leaves have anthocyanin or not ?

Now i'm not sure anymore... ::)

I think that i'll have to wait some more years for the fruits, as it is only 4 years old.

mrtexas

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Re: ID of a citrus tree grown from seed
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2017, 06:39:43 PM »
I have a sugar belle seedling about 6 feet tall. I let the seedling grow out until buds were big enough and then grafted to swingle rootstock. Budwood not available even if in Florida, apparently patented. However, seedlings of patented varieties aren't patented as far as I know but are identical. Don't think calling it sugar belle would be OK however. I could say "tastes like sugar belle" I suppose. Put some bearing turkish sugar orange buds on the top while I'm waiting. Why graft? Same reasons as bearing budwood. Faster growth and better root stock. Sugar belle seedling as root stock might be OK but why chance it? In ground for two years and bigger than 3 year trees on flying dragon. Nice big thorns. We will see whose seedling bears first. I handed out several seedlings to who ever would take them. Mine is biggest so far? Sugar belle fruit is very tasty which is why I'm growing it out. So is sumo which I was growing out but stopped when bud wood became available. It is available but I still don't have any. This tree had lots of bark cracking in the 19F freeze, one of the downsides of swingle and carrizo root stocks.

sugar1 by philip sauber, on Flickr

sugar2 by philip sauber, on Flickr

sugar3 by philip sauber, on Flickr
« Last Edit: September 06, 2017, 09:32:54 AM by mrtexas »

SoCal2warm

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Re: ID of a citrus tree grown from seed
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2017, 01:37:33 AM »
No idea what it is, but judging by those winged petioles and long thorns, I'd say it's probably not going to turn out something sweet.

Ynk88

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Re: ID of a citrus tree grown from seed
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2017, 03:57:35 PM »
No idea what it is, but judging by those winged petioles and long thorns, I'd say it's probably not going to turn out something sweet.

You're certainly right. But I'm too curious to see the fruits, if it turns to be something awful, I'll throw it away.

I have a sugar belle seedling about 6 feet tall. I let the seedling grow out until buds were big enough and then grafted to swingle rootstock. Budwood not available even if in Florida, apparently patented. However, seedlings of patented varieties aren't patented as far as I know but are identical. Don't think calling it sugar belle would be OK however. I could say "tastes like sugar belle" I suppose. Put some bearing turkish sugar orange buds on the top while I'm waiting. Why graft? Same reasons as bearing budwood. Faster growth and better root stock. Sugar belle seedling as root stock might be OK but why chance it? In ground for two years and bigger than 3 year trees on flying dragon. Nice big thorns. We will see whose seedling bears first. I handed out several seedlings to who ever would take them. Mine is biggest so far? Sugar belle fruit is very tasty which is why I'm growing it out. So is sumo which I was growing out but stopped when bud wood became available. It is available but I still don't have any. This tree had lots of bark cracking in the 19F freeze, one of the downsides of swingle and carrizo root stocks.


I'm not sure to understand everything you wrote, but your Sugar belle will surely bear first, because it's grafted and in the ground.
We don't have Sugar belle in Europe or never heard of it, but we also have tasty hybrids like Tacle and Mandared.
In Switzerland, with the climate we have, it is better to graft on hardy rootstock, but I never grafted my seedlings, as I'm not sure to be able to do it.

 

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