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Author Topic: Passifloras suited for a drier climate?  (Read 144 times)

sildanani

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Passifloras suited for a drier climate?
« on: September 12, 2017, 12:56:39 PM »
Hey all,
I would like some suggestions of Passiflora species for a dry/not very humid, yet warm climate. I keep most of my plants in a heated greenhouse that stays anywhere between the low 60s and mid 90s year round. (Depending on the weather outside.) I have species growing vigorously, but I am concerned to if they will flower or fruit eventually. I have some growing on trellises attached to a wall, but plan to have some grow on a home-made "Spiraclimb" using garden wire and a stake so the plant can be wrapped around as an endless bush-vine.  Maybe some of our California or Arizona growers could give a clue?
Thanks in advance! :)
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 01:21:16 PM by sildanani »
Anisha

spaugh

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Re: Passifloras suited for a drier climate?
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2017, 01:33:25 PM »
Yes they thrive in hot dry weather.  Member GregA here has a bunch going in his yard which is in a dry inland area near my place.  I put a few in a month or two ago and they took the recent 108F dry week long heat wave no problem and are blooming and growing fast already.

raimeiken

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Re: Passifloras suited for a drier climate?
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2017, 03:26:05 PM »
I grow purple possum and it's a strong vigorous grower. I have it climbing a metal trellis in full sun here in AZ. Frederick does well here too. There's also a few native ones here too.

I was told Incense does well out here also.

I also just got a quadrangularis and so far so good in this heat.

spaugh

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Re: Passifloras suited for a drier climate?
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2017, 04:54:27 PM »
Purple possum and fredrick edulus are also what they sell here.

AndrewAZ

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Re: Passifloras suited for a drier climate?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2017, 11:48:58 PM »
There is a native AZ passiflora that has attractive flowers and would have to be extremely heat and drought tolerant.

nullzero

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Re: Passifloras suited for a drier climate?
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2017, 01:18:23 AM »
There is a native AZ passiflora that has attractive flowers and would have to be extremely heat and drought tolerant.

Passiflora bryoniodes
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

Greg A

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Re: Passifloras suited for a drier climate?
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2017, 01:19:09 AM »
Yeah, I'm in basically the same climate as Spaugh in inland San Diego County that is on the dry side and my passion fruit do pretty well. What I've found is that they continue to grow and flower like crazy even if I don't give them much water, but if I want a lot of juicy fruit then I need to water them adequately.

The varieties I've tried are Nancy Garrison, Black Knight, Frederick, and Purple Possum. Purple Possum has been my favorite so far in terms of fruit taste.
gregalder.com/yardposts/

sildanani

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Re: Passifloras suited for a drier climate?
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2017, 03:55:31 AM »
Thanks for the replies guys-! I must have left this out, but I have fruited what i believe to be "Purple Possum" from a Floridian nursery plant. But it kept on dying back on winter and eventually was a goner. :'( I did get quite a few fruits out of it. They were so much better than store bought yellow ones. I kind of would like to try ligularis or alata. I currently have rooted cuttings of P. edulis (purple type).

Its cool to hear someone is experimenting with P. quad. I have tried growing it, but it took over my wall with not a single flower. (I believe I was fertilizing too much.)

I want to use a Spiraclimb structure so I can take move my Passifloras from the greenhouse outside with ease and not let them take over too much. Maybe exposing them to a more variable temperature drop outside could trigger flowering? Or just heavy pruning. I just know now not to fertilize too much. I be a bit heavy-handed. ::)

If anyone's got cuttings of non-Passiflora edulis, I'm all over that cuz I'm too freaking impatient for seedlings and dont want to dabble with bootleg eBay seeds.. I'm not sure how shipping goes with CA. Sounds too complicated for me to bother with trades.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 03:58:43 AM by sildanani »
Anisha

 

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