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Messages - Triloba Tracker

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1
Cool, thanks for sharing!

2
KarenRei, any word back from KSU?

3
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Leaf Scorch?
« on: October 06, 2018, 12:20:40 PM »
I'd think the leaves would be lighter green if they were getting excessive sun.
Right - so what Iím calling scorch is not an overdose of UV but mostly due to inadequate water movement caused by poor root system. It manifests in hot dry weather.

4
Sheri is great....Sometimes it can take a bit for a response due to her workload.

There are some cultivars selected in cooler US areas like Michigan and even some from Ontario (I think NC-1?).
Then i guess there are early season cultivars that may require fewer "heat-units"
If I recall correctly I think KSU-Benson is considered early. If you check out nuttrees.net (Cliff England Nursery) he has some varieties that he describes as very early.

Cheers!

5
You could peruse the KSU website for additional info (sometimes I find the stuff on sfgate to be dubious) but you're probably right.

That's a shame, since it's such a cool plant and fruit. It's really unique compared to the other commonly-grown Annonas.

6
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Leaf Scorch?
« on: October 03, 2018, 04:01:43 PM »
No, no ferts in my case but research Iíve done does associate this symptom with fertilizer burn.
Iím convinced itís scorch.

7
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Maypop (Passiflora incarnata) Thread
« on: October 01, 2018, 09:35:25 AM »
I am excited nonetheless. Passion fruit and Switzerland aren't two words that usually go toghether.

Absolutely!! Thatís how I feel about growing them here - the only way I can get passion fruit in a reasonable fashion. (Even though maypop is native here, most people donít know about it.)

Congrats on your first fruits. Yes - After a couple or 3 days the fruit begins tasting off. Tropical hybrids like Iridescence are an exception to this.

8
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Maypop (Passiflora incarnata) Thread
« on: September 30, 2018, 04:24:08 PM »
I assume you already have at least one other Passiflora,or you wouldnít have had fruit at all?
I believe to have good fruit set and fruits that arenít hollow, you need multiple vines of different genotypes.
You can also hand-pollinate to increase pulp in the fruits.

It appears from the picture that the fruit was not quite ready. When fully ripe most pulp will have at least some yellow coloration, and the seed sacs will be softer.

I believe the only time fruit should be picked is if it has a clear fruity aroma. Otherwise itís too soon. I let mine drop always but I have a fence to keep our animals.

Very excited for you though! Thank you for sharing. Were these your first fruits?

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Broken taproot: better roots
« on: September 25, 2018, 05:58:21 PM »
I disagree to the common opinion here.
It depends a lot on the plant.
There are some plants that get severely stunted if are not allowed to grow the taproot, it's especially true for plants that grow the taproot quickly (some even before sprouting), like jackfruit for example.

Yes, Asimina triloba sends out long taproot, 14 inches or longer, before shoot appears.

10
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Passiflora arida - Desert Passionfruit
« on: September 25, 2018, 05:56:18 PM »
sure it's all good!

11
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Passiflora arida - Desert Passionfruit
« on: September 25, 2018, 02:31:26 PM »
Are we allowed to put phone numbers on this forum?

I would advise against that.
Instead Send a ďmessageĒ via the Forum directly to the users who are requesting the personís contact info.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Broken taproot: better roots
« on: September 25, 2018, 01:00:33 PM »
I'm interested in this discussion because there are some, e.g. Bill Whitcomb, who declare all taproots to be bad, even for trees eventually to be planted in the ground.

However, many nurserymen recognize that certain trees have "strong" taproots and grow them in tall pots to intentionally accommodate the root. Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is an example, but there are others.

It seems to me that if the tree's natural habit is to produce a deep taproot, it should be allowed to do so IF you plan to plant it in the ground eventually.

I could see the argument for inhibiting taproot growth if it will be in a pot long-term.

Would be interested in hearing more about this, as i'm not much of an expert to say the least.

13
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Leaf Scorch?
« on: September 24, 2018, 04:59:15 PM »
Are the following pictures indicative of ďleaf scorch?Ē
These are young trees that for most of the summer I fear had wet feet causing a weak root system.
I exposed the soil around the trees to aid in drying. We then have had quite hot, dry, and windy weather.

Iím thinking this is the perfect setup for leaf scorch.

Thoughts?






14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Leaf Scorch?
« on: September 23, 2018, 10:29:29 PM »
Are the following pictures indicative of ďleaf scorch?Ē
These are young trees that for most of the summer I fear had wet feet causing a weak root system.
I exposed the soil around the trees to aid in drying. We then have had quite hot, dry, and windy weather.

Iím thinking this is the perfect setup for leaf scorch.

Thoughts?






15
It's great someone is interested in these species,
I'm going to go out on a limb and guess to get them growing around Europe and fruit production?
I'm pretty sure monetary gain is out of the question.
Iím guilty of tunnel vision around A. triloba - I donít know anything about these others. I wouldíve thought their fruit are undesirable or else theyíd be more widely cultivated.

16
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Passiflora arida - Desert Passionfruit
« on: September 21, 2018, 05:26:06 PM »
Is this cold hardy?

I ask because:
1) i might want to grow it
2) this is the Temperate, not Tropical, part of the forum  ;D

17
what are your goals with the other Asimina species?

18
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Cherimoya/Pawpaw hybrid
« on: September 19, 2018, 06:15:24 PM »
That's awesome!

yes feel free to send me a message.. also it might be nice to hear about your pawpaws, in general, over on the "asiminaholics anonymous" thread...

19
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Cherimoya/Pawpaw hybrid
« on: September 19, 2018, 05:29:27 PM »
I agree and all excellent points!
Great pictures.

How long have you been growing pawpaw? Would like to hear more about your trees, etc

20
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Cherimoya/Pawpaw hybrid
« on: September 19, 2018, 12:10:27 PM »

4) i think a comparison of seed-to-flesh ratio of pawpaw and cherimoya would be interesting. Pawpaw is considered pretty "seedy" except for a few varieties particularly from Neal Peterson. Cherimoyas do have a lot of seeds, in a sense, but they are small and easily avoided. Pawpaw seeds are a little more annoying.

Take care!!

It's funny because it is all relative. After eating lots of sugar apples that have *tons* of seeds, I don't think cherimoyas are all that seedy! It all depends on your basis of view :)

Agree!
Thatís why seed to weight/flesh ratios would be interesting to compare.
For example Neal Petersonís Susquehanna pawpaw he reports only 3% seed by total weight. Thatís considered very low (good).

21
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Cherimoya/Pawpaw hybrid
« on: September 19, 2018, 08:29:38 AM »
I absolutely think you should do whatever you are driven to do! As we say, "there's a first time for everything."

Do you have mature Asimina triloba trees of your own? Or where are you getting your pollen?

I would quibble with a few of the things you mentioned about Asimina triloba:
1) If the fruit falls on its own, there will be a "scar" - a hole in the skin and slight indentation in the flesh. The fruit definitely does not have a clean separation like a mango or apple or pear. It can be cut at the peduncle to avoid this, but not if the fruit is in a cluster or if you are harvesting a lot of fruit.
2) The skin is actually usually quite thin and fragile. From the cherimoyas i've eaten, the cherimoya skin is much, much thicker and tougher than pawpaw
3) short shelf-life of pawpaw is considered one of its major drawbacks. I would say it's about the same as cherimoya, possibly worse.
4) i think a comparison of seed-to-flesh ratio of pawpaw and cherimoya would be interesting. Pawpaw is considered pretty "seedy" except for a few varieties particularly from Neal Peterson. Cherimoyas do have a lot of seeds, in a sense, but they are small and easily avoided. Pawpaw seeds are a little more annoying.

Take care!!

22
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« on: September 18, 2018, 04:44:18 PM »


I thought my pawpaw was just setting buds for the spring, but this one definitely looks like it's opening now. This tree flowered this spring as well, though only three flowers. Is this normal, and if not, does anyone know why? The spring flowers didn't set fruit.


http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=15345.0

In this older thread I see TriangleJohn reported a branch re-flowering in the fall. So, I guess this is not without precedent. Very interesting.

23
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Cherimoya/Pawpaw hybrid
« on: September 18, 2018, 04:40:08 PM »
For informational purposes only:
Folks have tried crossing pawpaw with its tropical relatives before, if i'm not mistaken. Possibly as far back as Fairchild, Zimmerman...and possibly even Bill Whitman (I know he tried growing pawpaw but not sure about hybridizing).
Neal Peterson of eminent pawpaw fame has focused on Asimina inter-specific crosses and I believe had tried Annona crosses unsuccessfully prior to that (could be wrong on that).

To me the pawpaw is so unique and different from Annona species, i'm not sure what the goals of crossing would be. (legitimate question, not snark) :)

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Really Good Flavicarpa Passionfruit
« on: September 17, 2018, 01:05:01 PM »
This is awesome...i wish I were in a region where I could feast on all these great passionfruits.

To ScottR's comment - I have been into Passiflora incarnata for a few years and I can't understand why more work hasn't been done to improve this species for fruit.
I have done some very rudimentary selection (no controlled crosses) and have vines that i think make great fruit, but haven't had any major breakthroughs.
I have heard that some are working on fruit improvement but it's not out in the open, that I can tell. As Scott said, mostly flower selection happening.

I do have one hybrid that has flavicarpa attributes (floral, etc) but fairly sour.

25
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Maypop (Passiflora incarnata) Thread
« on: September 14, 2018, 10:29:43 AM »
Mine tastes like pineapple and banana. More sweet than P. edulis.

I got to taste one fruit from my vine, I got seeds from gooner 2-3 years ago from his wild collected fruits. And it does taste like pineapple(less banana) or maybe a virgin pinacolada with little drop of acidity so very nice to eat out of hand! no need to add sugar or honey, but my vines are small so maybe later the sweetness will be higher.. Sorry forgot to take a photo..

That's awesome! so exciting to taste something for the first time, especially when you grow it yourself.
I can see the pineapple a little bit. The flavor for me is hard to describe. I just noticed a little banana myself, actually, in one of my vine's fruits this year. Particularly the aroma, more than the taste.
I feel like there's an orange juice (i.e. out of a bottle) taste aspect.

As for fruit quality changing or variation. This has been my experience so far in a few years growing these: the first one or two fruits a vine produces each year are usually not very tasty. After that, the flavor improves during the season. Toward the end of the season the fruit quality can decline a bit too. Drier fruits perhaps but maybe not as sweet.
I also feel like the fruit should drop on its own and if found very soon, is best enjoyed about a day later. Fresh off the ground is good too though. after a couple days, the flavor declines and begins to take on a savory aspect.
Also, there is variation in flavor and sweetness across genotypes, as with most/all fruiting plants. I have grown many of my own seedlings and they do have different characteristics. I had one this year whose fruits were completely sour. Every one. So, that vine was killed-off  ;D

Addendum - Fruit size and shape, not surprisingly, are also variable across genotypes. Fruit can be spherical, ovoid, or even pointed at the base. Some of my vines can produce nearly tennis-ball sized fruit and others are like ping-pong balls (though the latter are hybrid vines).

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