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Hi All

I have a few seeds of Syzygium suborbiculare and Syzygium wilsonii for trade, interested in any Annona species (not common ones), i.e dwarfs and or odd Pouteria sp or Asimina species other than triloba and parviflora.......obovata I am chasing.

Please note these seeds are the size of, and slightly larger than a golf ball. S. wilsonii much smaller.

PM if interested.

Cheers
12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Define "dappled shade"...
« Last post by Paquicuba on Today at 08:16:23 AM »
Dappled shade to me is like the shade a plant gets under the canopy of a palm tree. That is, the plant or just parts of the plant will be exposed to direct sunlight for a few seconds to a few a minutes max then back to the shade of the palm tree (depending on the wind speed and canopy cover of course,) so the plant has time to cool off. It's like an on/off switch between sunlight and shade or nature's auto sun/shade mode - once the plant is uncomfortable being hit directly by the sun's rays, it's switched to shade mode and after it cools off and it's ready for some extra direct light, it's switched to sunlight mode.
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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Turpentine Rootstock Update
« Last post by zands on Today at 07:22:17 AM »
The overwhelming majority of mangos that come out of Florida are Zill nursery trees grafted to turpentine from Costa Rica. Been that way for a long time. So this Costa Rican turpentine evidently struggles in California.

struggles here in AZ too. Others that are successful basically dig giant holes in ground and heavily amend the soil. Makes it so like having a giant pot in ground.

It seems like turp root stock via Zill grafting needs this babying in heavy clay soils of California..      FWIW....In Florida sandy soils I always dug out my soil and kept the topsoil. Dug nice and deep (two and three feet) and threw in cheap Home Depot topsoil that was black. I tossed the sub soil and threw the top soil into the planting hole. Tossed the sub soil  into the trash barrel. To be put into the town dump.

Your amending into a giant pot in the ground sounds good. This enables the mango tree to achieve liftoff     Then it has the strength to deal w your hostile soils.
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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Zill's Ambrosia Mango
« Last post by pineislander on Today at 06:12:04 AM »
Zill's inventory sheet lists it as:

Quote
Mixed Fruit Flavor, Mid season
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I run on 24/7 light and my CAM plants in general do poorer than my non-CAM plants.  I think you need a proper night cycle to get good growth out of CAM plants.  But that of course means more light during the day to make up for it.  Non-CAM plants seem to generally quite enjoy 24-7 light.  I may at some point switch to 18-6, depending on how the greenhouse project goes  ;)  Also, a few of my plants are short-day plants, so when they reach flowering size, if I want to get anything out of them I'll have to cut to even shorter day lengths, at least until flowering/fruiting is triggered.
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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Define "dappled shade"...
« Last post by KarenRei on Today at 05:59:44 AM »
That's a good point.  I think I should probably have a separate "dappled shade" category in my spreadsheet to make the distinction. PFAF doesn't have one in their database, yet the descriptions on both PFAF and Useful Tropical Plants frequently mention it, and it seems an important distinction.  When planting / placing I should probably lean toward the "too much" shade perspective rather than "too little", as that term seems suggestive of the plant having trouble with more than brief exposure to direct sunlight.
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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Define "dappled shade"...
« Last post by fruitlovers on Today at 05:56:24 AM »
Dappled shade = filtered sunlight. The kind of condition that you get when you use shade cloth. That is very different from full shade, where no sun shines through, or partial shade, where you may have shade for x number of hours and sun for x number of hours.
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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fermenting tropical fruits into alcohol
« Last post by bbudd on Today at 05:54:30 AM »
Hey-sorry for the double post
It said the first didn't post
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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fermenting tropical fruits into alcohol
« Last post by bbudd on Today at 05:53:05 AM »
Roselle wine-for 5 gallon
 3-4 kilo fresh roselle blossoms (without the cores) -there's a big difference between the taste with dried and fresh Roselle
8-10 kilo sugar
lalvin yeast is preferred
Put roselle in bucket with 3 gallons boiling water-add sugar and fill with additional boiled water
Let stand till cool and add yeast
I generally start removing the blossoms after the 3rd day-otherwise they float and can mold
Length of ferment depends on temperature

Passion-fruit wine-for 5 gallon
6-10 kilo passion-fruit -depends on there size
10-12 kilo sugar
yeast of choice
Just empty the passion-fruit pulp into the bucket
Add HOT or boiling water and sugar
Cool and add yeast
The pulp and seed are removed when yeast has stopped working
Honey makes a nice addition-2 quarts

Watermelon wine
2-3 melon -depends on size-remove as much rind as possible
8-10 kilo sugar and 1 quart honey
yeast of choice
fill bucket with boiling water
let cool and add yeast
ferment till done-finished bubbling
I use airlocks on the buckets-keeps out unwanted bacteria and makes it easy to see when yeast has finished working and everything is sanitized before use

I strain any fruit residue then let sit to settle any sediment and rack at least twice before bottling
The watermelon and roselle are fine after a couple weeks-but both the watermelon and passion-fruit improve greatly with age

You can even take things 1 step further and make your own specialty vinegar
red wine vinegar from the roselle
malt vinegar from beer
even have a batch of balsamic vinegar ageing in oak
all you need is a vinegar "mother"
20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fermenting tropical fruits into alcohol
« Last post by bbudd on Today at 05:51:56 AM »
Roselle wine-for 5 gallon
 3-4 kilo fresh roselle blossoms (without the cores) -there's a big difference between the taste with dried and fresh roselly
8-10 kilo sugar
lalvin yeast is prefered
Put roselle in bucket with 3 gallons boiling water-add sugar and fill with additional boiled water
Let stand till cool and add yeast
I generally start removing the blossoms after the 3rd day-otherwise they float and can mold
Length of ferment depends on temperature

Passion-fruit wine-for 5 gallon
6-10 kilo passion-fruit -depends on there size
10-12 kilo sugar
yeast of choice
Just empty the passion-fruit pulp into the bucket
Add HOT or boiling water and sugar
Cool and add yeast
The pulp and seed are removed when yeast has stopped working
Honey makes a nice addition-2 quarts

Watermelon wine
2-3 melon -depends on size-remove as much rind as possible
8-10 kilo sugar and 1 quart honey
yeast of choice
fill bucket with boiling water
let cool and add yeast
ferment till done-finished bubbling
I use airlocks on the buckets-keeps out unwanted bacteria and makes it easy to see when yeast has finished working and everything is sanitized before use

I strain any fruit residue then let sit to settle any sediment and rack at least twice before bottling
The watermelon and roselle are fine after a couple weeks-but both the watermelon and passion-fruit improve greatly with age

You can even take things 1 step further and make your own specialty vinegar
red wine vinegar from the roselle
malt vinegar from beer
even have a batch of balsamic vinegar ageing in oak
all you need is a vinegar "mother"

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