Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: New Zealand Lemonade Tree  (Read 4464 times)

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2365
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: New Zealand Lemonade Tree
« Reply #25 on: February 01, 2015, 02:45:55 PM »
Lemons are slightly to moderately polyembryonic about 20 to 40 percent of their seed being polyembryonic.  Mandarins are quite polyembryonic.  With few exceptions most all citrus are polyembryonic. - Millet

starling1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 983
    • Queensland, Australia
    • View Profile
Re: New Zealand Lemonade Tree
« Reply #26 on: February 02, 2015, 03:42:13 AM »
If it comes true to seed, maybe it's a lemon X orange cross? This would explain BOTH the flavour AND the polyembriony, while (if i recall correctly) if the plant comes from a lemon X mandarin cross, there's no parent with a defined polyembriony.

There are a couple of different expressions of the fruit in Australia. Some have skin more like an orange, some are puffer and easier to peel like a mandarin but not to the same extent as mandarin. They are best picked when blushing yellow and still mostly green.

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2365
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: New Zealand Lemonade Tree
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2015, 09:56:13 AM »
So Starling1, You are saying pick a Lemonade fruit as you would pick a Lime. - Millet

starling1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 983
    • Queensland, Australia
    • View Profile
Re: New Zealand Lemonade Tree
« Reply #28 on: February 03, 2015, 09:40:35 PM »
So Starling1, You are saying pick a Lemonade fruit as you would pick a Lime. - Millet

Yes-- exactly. They are over ripe if they are totally yellow and may be acrid and lacking acidity.

vanman

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • Jenks, OK 7a
    • View Profile
Re: New Zealand Lemonade Tree
« Reply #29 on: November 29, 2017, 11:54:47 PM »
This the first fruit of NZ lemonade grafted 2 summers ago. 

After reading this post today, I picked one that was yellow and another that was 70% green. 

There were about 4-6 seeds per fruit. 


I had high expectations. I like my lemonade very sweet.  Unfortunitely, it wasn't that sweet.  It taste like a lemon that isn't too sour.  The green one did taste better that the yellow one.  Hopefully with time it will taste better.  It is very prolific.   

Also on these trees are Pomona acidless lemons and Hamlin oranges.  They are also first fruit and almost ready. 

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2365
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: New Zealand Lemonade Tree
« Reply #30 on: November 30, 2017, 12:35:54 PM »
For real sweet lemonade you have to add sugar.   Put some sugar on the NZL fruit and sweeten it up .  Did you make the containers that the trees are growing in?  Very nice and on rollers too.  What are the dimensions of the container, and what is the mixture of the medium you used.   Thanks for the pictures.

Tom

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 310
    • USA, Alabama,Montgomery, zone 8
    • View Profile
Re: New Zealand Lemonade Tree
« Reply #31 on: November 30, 2017, 05:59:57 PM »
vanman, your containers are beautiful. Do you know the gallons of soil and how long do you think you can keep your citrus in that size container ?  Do you have other citrus in these containers ? Reminds me of what Iíve seen in Versailles ! Iíve seen containers like that for sale and they can be very pricey ! Millet and/or maybe others have similar containers sometimes on pallets to move around as necessary. Again, maybe that is Versailles, great job !!! Tom

Galka

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 535
    • USA, FL, OCALA, 9A
    • View Profile
Re: New Zealand Lemonade Tree
« Reply #32 on: December 05, 2017, 12:38:53 PM »
I bought some lemonade lemons at The Fresh Market again. I actually asked the manager to order them for me because it was a while when I saw them for sale. Love the fruit.

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers