Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Anatomie of a flower ??'s  (Read 117 times)

Susanne42

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
    • Michigan Zone 5/6
    • View Profile
Anatomie of a flower ??'s
« on: November 26, 2017, 10:34:04 AM »
I noticed on some of my flowers (meyer. lemonquat ) that they are missing the stigma. Is there a reason for it? missing nutrition? normal because time of the year?

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2365
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: Anatomie of a flower ??'s
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2017, 11:32:27 AM »
Susanne incomplete flowers are very common.   T Each flower on the tree competes for the available nutrition with every other flower on the tree. Some flowers are winners and some flowers are losers.  Increasing fertilization will not change the situation.  It is a common situation of nature. Incomplete flowers  also seem to happen more often in young trees, and lessens as the tree ages.  Normally the complete flowers on the tree greatly outnumber those that do not completely fill out.  Not to worry.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 02:32:40 PM by Millet »

Susanne42

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
    • Michigan Zone 5/6
    • View Profile
Re: Anatomie of a flower ??'s
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2017, 01:24:11 PM »
Thank you Millet :)

Tom

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 310
    • USA, Alabama,Montgomery, zone 8
    • View Profile
Re: Anatomie of a flower ??'s
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2017, 09:16:48 AM »
Thanks for the excellent explanation of incomplete flowers. I wonder if it has anything to do with the enormous number of blooms that smell so good ? I think the tremendous bloom Meyer shows and the wonderful smell is what pushed me over the edge with my addiction to trying to grow citrus !!! Tom

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers