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Author Topic: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant  (Read 904 times)

Robindch

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Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« on: December 01, 2017, 09:25:33 PM »
I've starting germinating seeds of certain citrus fruits and would like to learn more on; how to increase the growth rate of the seedlings into plants, what chemicals are the best to increase this rate of growth and any other tips you all think would be necessary.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2017, 12:16:57 AM »
Well, you are in Trinidad, and citrus seedlings already grow quite fast there compared to colder less tropical climates. Perhaps a little bit of shade cloth during the hottest part of the year might be helpful for the small seedlings.

Be sure the seedlings have ample root space to grow and keep them consistently watered.

Robindch

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2017, 07:19:10 AM »
I will be using cow manure in my mix to increase the water retention of the soil, I did some research to learn of the nutrients and mineral contents of cow manure and from the research done it seems to contain all the necessary macro-nutrients for growth.  What might be some other additions you or any other member might suggest.

Millet

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2017, 01:35:54 PM »
Is this tree going to be grown in a container or in the ground?

Robindch

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2017, 02:44:13 PM »
It will be grown in a container.

Millet

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2017, 04:37:24 PM »
Manure is not a good fertilizer source for container plants, due to the higher levels of soluble salts.  The quickest method of growth, that I know of is give additional light to the tree from sunset to 10:00 PM, and keep the root zone at 80-F. Re-pot the tree into a new container before the tree's roots become root bound. A tree can be re-potted as soon as the roots are able to hold onto the soil when the tree is removed from the container.  Fertilize with a fertilizer as close to a 5-1-3 nutrient ratio plus the trace elements.   Be sure the tree is growing in a well draining medium.  Good luck to you and to this tree.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 04:43:08 PM by Millet »

citrange

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2017, 12:38:27 PM »
Robindch, although your conditions in Trinidad are totally different from those of us in cooler climates, you should be aware that 'water retention' in citrus containers can easily lead to root rot caused by phytophthora pathogens. That is why free-draining container mixes are so often recommended for citrus, unless your conditions mean the pots always dry out too rapidly.

Robindch

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2017, 11:55:37 AM »



As can be seen from that photo, those are some plants l've got (the plants to the front are avocado plants which I've grown from seeds, the plants to the back are a a variety of oranges given to me by someone, and there are a few tomato plants as well). I usually water them about once every 2 to 3 days. I even leave them for a week without water, when there is a lot of rain fall (note the plants are covered from being wet by the rain), the reason being if you look at the photo you'll see there is a layer of light brown dirt at the top, when it drys the moisture in the container is trapped, thus there is almost always water available for the plant(and no the roots aren't drowning in water ). Even under these conditions I haven't seen any rotting of the roots taking place, I shall continue observing and update on whether or not rotting of the roots occur.

Those a just a few of my plants, I have sown some pregerminated portugal seeds which are growing in cow manure, I'll update on those later this week.



Coach62

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2017, 04:36:50 PM »
Well, you are in Trinidad, and citrus seedlings already grow quite fast there compared to colder less tropical climates. Perhaps a little bit of shade cloth during the hottest part of the year might be helpful for the small seedlings.

Be sure the seedlings have ample root space to grow and keep them consistently watered.
Have you done research as to why it's not a good idea to grow citrus from seed?  You are probably wasting your time, unless it's for rootstock.

Robindch

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2018, 05:40:51 PM »
I have done research and yes most are for rootstock, also most of the seedlings grown from seeds here tend to be polyembryonic, which means there will be sprouts which are genetically identical to the parent plants, and I've been growing a local variety of lemon for my rootstock plant.

Millet

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Re: Increasing the growth rate of citrus from seedlings to plant
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2018, 05:53:08 PM »
Robindch, if you have the time (years) to wait for a seedling tree to grow and mature, then go for it.  In many cultivars it can be a wait of 4 to 10 years.  I grew a Seville sour orange from seed, it took 9 years before it produced the first fruit.

 

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