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Author Topic: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?  (Read 812 times)

chrobrego

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Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« on: January 04, 2018, 02:58:33 PM »
In the northern part of Orlando, we hit 29-30F for about 4 hours early this morning. This is the first time that I offered no protection since I didn't think we would drop below 32F -- I was wrong. Most of the trees have about the same level of protection from the cold -- no micro climates on my property. I've surveyed the damage so far amongst the tropicals:

NO DAMAGE:

Michelia Alba -- no damage (surprised)
Large peach cobbler mango -- no damage
Mallika mango (small tree)  (no damage at all)
Jaboticaba -- no damage
Sapodilla -- no damage (all 5 varieties the same)
Day avocado -- no damage
Wurtz avocado -- no damage
white sapote (sue belle) -- looks great, no damage at all
tamarind -- no damage
Grumichama -- no damage
Barbados cherry -- no damage
Canistel -- no damage
achairu (achacha) -- no damage
pitangatube -- no damage
pitanga -- no damage
pitomba -- no damage
Australian beach cherry -- no damage
guava -- no damage
cherry of the rio grande -- no damage
feijoa -- no damage
lemon drop mangosteen -- no damage


SOME DAMAGE:

Lychees -- trees ok but new growth toasted (old leaves ok)
Kohala longan -- same as lychee (new leaf burn but established leaves ok)
Ylang Ylang -- most of the exterior leaves toasted; did much better than I thought
Small mangos -- both lemon zest (toasted leaves), Maha Chanok (leaf burn), Pickering (some burn); most burn on lemon zest.
Large mangos -- Carrie (some leaf burn)
Pakistan mulberry -- quite a bit of leaf burn
Gefner atemoya -- some leaf burn
figs -- toasted leaves 100% (all 20 varieties)
sugar apple -- leaf damage (not too bad surprisingly)
Wax jambu -- leaf burn
jack fruit (about 3 feet tall) -- some leaf burn; surprised it wasn't killed


QUITE A BIT OF DAMAGE:

Bananas -- toasted leaves and trunks (Manzano, Dwarf Cavendish, Ice cream, Golden)
Kary starfruit -- leaves toasted and crispy (tree will survive though)
Papaya (Red Lady) -- extensive toasted leaves
Muntingia (strawberry tree) -- leaf burn extensive
Pacay -- leaf burn extensive


EXTENSIVE DAMAGE:

Abiu -- toasted leaves and all dropped already (may not survive)
Rollinia -- toasted leaves and all dropped
Peanut butter tree -- all leaves toasted; looks bad
Dragon fruit -- don't think it will make it

How about you all?  Similar results or different?  I'm trying to narrow down what plants are really ok for 9b Central Florida -- without being next to a lake, etc.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2018, 03:09:03 PM by chrobrego »

Tropheus76

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2018, 03:29:56 PM »
I am south east of you almost to the Brevard county border. I anticipated low temps and got upper 20s and heavy frost and tonight will supposedly be colder than last night, but I probably wont have daylight time to go and survey damage to my stuff until Monday evening. But anticipating it I wrapped the trunks of my moringa and African sausage trees as well as a hong kong orchid(its not fruit but it looks nice). I covered all of my in ground mangoes, jackfruit, and wax jambu as well as mounded mulch around their bases. They should be ok like that until Sunday or Monday evening. Worried about my all spice and longon in the back yard and not too concerned about anything else, not like we got hit with an ice storm and the rain fortunately had plenty of time to dry before the cold hit yesterday.

C24mccain

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2018, 03:53:13 PM »
We we're at 32 or lower for nearly 8 hours last night here in Lakeland. I'll only comment on things I didn't protect. We were at 28-29 degrees for about 4 hours of the 8. Indian jujube (Thai giant) looks toast this afternoon. Of course all bananas. Navel orange, pineapple orange, Meyer lemon, Ruby red grapefruit all look like they took a serious beating last night. I did not protect them because the freeze was far more severe than forcast. Starfruit leaves look to me like they had a bad night. All trees under cover with heat lamp are fine. Trees like mangoes all appear to be fine but I have heard they are slow to shown death signs. Some of these trees I protected with burn barrels and I suspect the side closest to barrel might be ok while opposite side will show damage within a week. All fig leaves were toast but expected. Mulberry leaves toast. Moringa toast. Peaches had no leaves as they were dormant. Everything in the garden took a beating. Guava tree leaves are looking worse and worse through the day. Dragon fruit cactus looks like it's turning to mush. I tried protecting the dragon fruit and guava as they were in proximity to a burn barrel but it failed to help. Tonight trees I protected like jackfruit, green sapote, macadamia nut, Sapodilla, sweetheart lychee, coconut cream mango are either going to have their plug pulled and left to the freeze as we are going to redo our entire project, or I may leave them plugged into the heat lamp and sell them as they are all small enough for transplant. My bacon and Mexicola avocado look good so far. Some leaf damage was spotted on my white sapote a few hours ago. Pineapples all took a beating accept maybe some that were close to burn barrels. I had freezing temps for two hours before I even got the barrels cranking as 32 degrees hit us 3-4 hours earlier than forcast.

C24mccain

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2018, 04:30:35 PM »
Just did a walk around at 4pm. Longan leaves looking bad now, white sapote looks bad, both avocados especially the Bacon starting to show signs. Kent, Keitt, are both starting to show signs of burn. Glenn was better protected as I positioned the burn barrel better on that tree. Lychee showing some signs. We were hit hard here.

TnTrobbie

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2018, 04:50:14 PM »
Lake Placid in Highlands county. We has a little frost about 2-3 weeks ago. Only some discoloration on my young sapodilla leaves. This morning however, my Raja Puri banana pup (3ft tall) looks like a goner. Young coconuts (1gal) not looking too good either. Fronds are brown-er. Seeing some frost damage on some of the lower mango tree leaves. Jackfruit trees not looking to bad neither. I didn't bother to venture too deep into my yard to fully assess the damage as I didnt want to lose too much sleep over it. After the next 2-3 more nights of this very cold weather then I'll fully assess. Brought in all of my seedlings and cold sensitive plants yesterday. Thank God I did. Mulberries did well.
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No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)

TnTrobbie

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2018, 04:55:37 PM »
Wanted to add that my two in ground peanut butter trees did well so far.  I have a pond on the front about 1/2 an acre. My neighbour to the left has a 1.5 acre pond in the back, and to the right, that neighbours has about 4 acres of wetlands.
The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)

roblack

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2018, 05:16:50 PM »
Hit the low 40's here overnight. Did not bring anything in. All trees seem fine, including acai palm, jucara palm, borojoa, cacao, abiu, dragon fruit, etc. Might bring a few in tonight though, as it may get even cooler. Good luck everyone!

Tropheus76

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2018, 07:21:44 PM »
I managed a quick walk through before it got dark. We must have had a windstorm today, some of my deer cages I put blankets over went flying. My mountain annonna had fried leaves. My African Sausage every leaf was fried. Hope it comes back, trunk was wrapped in a heavy blanket though. Bananas ...... Everything else I looked at was ok. Now the cold night....

After night two. Apparently the wind turned my covered deer cage over my Wax Jambu into a kite and blew into the woods leaving it unprotected.
So heavily fried trees at this point:
Wax Jambu
Parts of wind exposed jack fruit
Mountain Annona
"gold" annona
Juman tree
Surinam cherry
melon berry
all gauvas except lemon guava which doesnt appear to have noticed it was cold
Pommalo
sugar apple even though it was in the process of dropping its leaves anyway
White Sapote
Black Sapote
a lot of my ornamentals turned straight up brown.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2018, 08:52:30 PM by Tropheus76 »

chrobrego

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2018, 07:41:54 PM »
Hoping my mango trees and lychees make it. Everything else is icing.

behlgarden

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2018, 10:51:24 PM »
Frost damage is not immediately seen, most severe symptoms start showing up after days and sometimes weeks, that has been my observation from last two Frost's in southern California few years ago.

dwfl

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2018, 12:31:28 AM »
Frost damage is not immediately seen, most severe symptoms start showing up after days and sometimes weeks, that has been my observation from last two Frost's in southern California few years ago.

True ^ Damage not always evident right away. Also some species are fine with a quick cold snap one morning, some aren't, and some are more affected when it's multiple nights/mornings in a row like this front.

TnTrobbie

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2018, 06:51:31 PM »
Did a walk through the property today. My mango trees are young and new planted from 3gal to 25gal. Some burn was evident. Julie, East Indian, Ice Cream has some bad burn but still green stems.  ZIC's 5inch inflorence are droopy so potential crop loss there. 1gal Coconuts took a hit. Crispy brown but the cores are still green so we'll see. The bananas will survive. Jabo looked normal. Grumichama, Jamacian Cherry, Pitomba.....normal. The next few days will reveal the true damage. Thinking about tall hedges and multiple burn bins.
The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)

dwfl

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2018, 07:33:42 PM »
Did a walk through the property today. My mango trees are young and new planted from 3gal to 25gal. Some burn was evident. Julie, East Indian, Ice Cream has some bad burn but still green stems.  ZIC's 5inch inflorence are droopy so potential crop loss there. 1gal Coconuts took a hit. Crispy brown but the cores are still green so we'll see. The bananas will survive. Jabo looked normal. Grumichama, Jamacian Cherry, Pitomba.....normal. The next few days will reveal the true damage. Thinking about tall hedges and multiple burn bins.

Bamboo perimeter can help

sunworshiper

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2018, 11:55:12 AM »
I decided not to stress this cold snap, and just did c9 xmas lights and not full shelters. My low was around 30 going off the nearest weather station's readings. Some bananas (unprotected) browned, and unfurling leaf tips on my lychee got nipped back a bit, but all else looks good. The lychee should be about perfect, it nipped back flushing leaves, so hopefully it will rebound with flushing blooms instead=)

An interesting observation - the area of my yard that is coldest, where the bananas browned, the tri-colored oyster plant next to them were totally melted. In other areas of my yard that get less cold due to microclimates, the oyster plants are undamaged, and so were bananas in those spots. Since they are a really common landscaping plant, the oyster plants seem to be a nice indicator for people contemplating zone pushing. If the oyster plants get killed back by frost in your neighborhood, chances are any mangos, lychees, bananas etc you are contemplating adding will need cold protection.

Tropheus76

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2018, 06:15:43 PM »
Wow I finally got a chance to walk around and look at things. I have some odd micro-climates apparently.
My eastern grove with its 35ish trees is toasted. I even put some up under the oaks that are in the woods on the east side of my property. They always have sun but are somewhat protected. I thought. Pretty much every tree that hadnt already lost its leaves is a brown color now. Mangoes protected by sheets, jack fruit protected by a thermal blanket, deer cages wrapped in blankets, most sensitive trees mulch mounded up their trunks. The only trees that are evergreen that are still green are my carob and Irish strawberry. The strawberry is no surprise since I got it from Washington state. Fried from this area consist of 2 mangoes, a jackfruit, jamun, a few sugar apple types, moringa, spanish lime, reb jaboticaba, a rainbow eucalyptus, a bunch of guavas, and some other odds and ends.

Now my back two grove areas had the opposite happen for the most part. This area is also partially shaded by oaks on the north side of my property. My all-spice trees and fully exposed longon took it like champs and have very little visible damage. All of my lychees look fine except for the biggest one that had some fresh leaf flush that burnt and not even all of that. Now next to my longon a black sapote took it hard and a mulberry nearby has a lot of burned individual leaves. Dragonfruit so far dont seem to care.

My fruit orchard looks horrible. Two mangoes which were covered with thermal blankets and mounded are sickly yellow brown, although the cotton candy being bushier seems to have some green leaves in the center. Most of my ornamentals are brown/black but I expect them to come back in spring. Black pepper climbing my oak? Gone. A lot of bromiliads under that oak are yellow now. Mountain annona, starfruit, white guava, melon berry, my prized African sausage, favorite productive sugar apple and another jackfruit, all in varying shades of brown/black. The Mountain annona is supposed to not care about high 20s. A cheriyoma looks in rough shape but hasnt changed yet. A white sapote has yellowed but not turned brown either. Bananas of course are toasted, hope they come back.

Things that weathered the storm well, olives show no concern, lychees, loquats, pomegranates, lemon guava out in the open, pineapple guava, citrus(even a Key Lime in the open with no protection), Irish strawberries, carob, Allspice(could be from a protected microclimate).

Now to see what comes back and that will determine what I need in the future to replace things with.

TnTrobbie

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2018, 08:04:46 AM »
I see that my area is expecting 30s for a low on Wednesday. Yikes. Gonna cover up what remaining my recovering banana and coconut trees. I cant lose these.
The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)

Orkine

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Re: Central Florida Cold Snap: What did well and what did poorly?
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2018, 04:01:33 PM »
For those with serious mango damage. 
I had a mango I took for dead many years ago.  It had been unprotected and the temperatures had dropped and stayed low for a long time.
All the leaves fell off and I was sure it was dead.
I cut off the upper part leaving about a two foot stump that I planned to dig up when I had the time.
You can only imagine my surprise when the plant came back.  Pushed new shoot all over and today it is a very happy tree. 

What I am saying is, unless the replacement is ready consider cutting back trees that may look like they died.  If they did, it wouldn't matter and you will remove them anyway when you replacements are ready.  If they are not dead you could be rewarded with your nice trees back producing in a year instead of starting a new tree and waiting a couple of years.


 

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