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Messages - snowjunky

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Bael fruit.
« on: November 26, 2017, 06:52:18 AM »
Have a bael tree growing. Getting to about the size it should start fruiting soon. It's an interesting and very unusual tasting fruit. Worth growing. But be forewarned, the tree is extremely thorny.
Did your bael fruit tree fruit yet Oscar?  Where is the origin?
Not yet, but haven't checked it in a while. Started it from seed. Forget the source. Might be from seeds i brought from India.
Do you have a long dry season for it to fruit?  According to https://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/bael_fruit.html
I'll be happy to graft it onto my small tree.  It should fruit here in Phoenix no problem  ;D

2
Update:
So i went to the Avocado grafting class at the RFVC of Broward and i grafted a Day/Brodgon tree. So if it takes then it has a spot in the yard.
Does anyone have info in "Red Russel", "VW Red" and "Big Red (Avocado)"?

Day and Brogdon have two different growth habits.  Not the best thing for cocktail trees...

So is Day avocado a dwarf, compact, medium or large grower? 
Sorry to revive an old thread, but could not find much info on Day here or online. 
If it's so tasty and also cold hardy, then why is it kind of obscure?  Not like it's a new variety.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Bael fruit.
« on: November 10, 2017, 05:41:28 PM »
Have a bael tree growing. Getting to about the size it should start fruiting soon. It's an interesting and very unusual tasting fruit. Worth growing. But be forewarned, the tree is extremely thorny.
Did your bael fruit tree fruit yet Oscar?  Where is the origin?

4
These are worth growing and probably not common in the Philippines.
Atemoya, loquat, achacha, Mexican Garcinia, Psidium Guineense, Barbados cherry, canistel, ross sapote, figs, apples, persimmon, jujube, passion fruit, white sapote, guabiju, wampee, pitangatuba, marula, monkey orange, mulberries, peaches, citrus, kwai muk, avocado, akee, black sapote, mamey sapote, grumachama, icecream bean, pomegranate, cambuca, mamoncillo

There are so many good fruits common or native to the Philippines like duhat, velvet apple, camachili, chico, sineguelas...

Interstingly, fruits like the canistel, mamey sapote, mulberries, rollinia, passion fruit, atemoya, acerola, black sapote, pomegranate etc. have been in the country for a long time. Many people even mistake those aforementioned fruits as indigenous species. It just seems they never took off because people don't know how to use it. Avocados and are an exception and is actually quite common. Widespread citrus plantations on the other hand were destroyed in the 60's by citrus canker. I'm not sure if peaches, persimmon and Mediterranean figs can be grown in Baguio though. It may be worth a try, I just think its either too wet and humid or too warm in winter months.
In addition, Campomanesias, and other species of Mangifera and Durio may work in the highland subtropical climate of Baguio.
Peaches, persimmon and fig fruit in Florida so it might fruit in Baguio.  Persimmon and fig are very low chill.  Very low chill peaches might fruit also.
But I'm not that familiar with the Philippines and have never been to Baguio, so I'm no expert.

5
These are worth growing and probably not common in the Philippines.
Atemoya, loquat, achacha, Mexican Garcinia, Psidium Guineense, Barbados cherry, canistel, ross sapote, figs, apples, persimmon, jujube, passion fruit, white sapote, guabiju, wampee, pitangatuba, marula, monkey orange, mulberries, peaches, citrus, kwai muk, avocado, akee, black sapote, mamey sapote, grumachama, icecream bean, pomegranate, cambuca, mamoncillo

There are so many good fruits common or native to the Philippines like duhat, velvet apple, camachili, chico, sineguelas...
That was in addition to what other already mentioned previously.

6
These are worth growing and probably not common in the Philippines.
Atemoya, loquat, achacha, Mexican Garcinia, Psidium Guineense, Barbados cherry, canistel, ross sapote, figs, apples, persimmon, jujube, passion fruit, white sapote, guabiju, wampee, pitangatuba, marula, monkey orange, mulberries, peaches, citrus, kwai muk, avocado, akee, black sapote, mamey sapote, grumachama, icecream bean, pomegranate, cambuca, mamoncillo

There are so many good fruits common or native to the Philippines like duhat, velvet apple, camachili, chico, sineguelas...

7
"It's not going to get in if you wrapped it properly starting from the bottom up and past the top of the rootstock about an inch. "

Well, my veneer graft was for re-work a larger mango, so the top of the root stock is too tall to cover, and I don't think the uncovered rootstock is the problem, but the scion. As the scion sent out new growth, Walter Zill said to uncover it and I agreed with him. So after the top of the scion is uncovered to let the new growth exposed, how do you prevent water get into the two side-channels?

I'm talking about condensation that builds up from within the parafilm, it is perspiration from the plant tissue, not water getting inside from rain or watering.

I was discussing about rain water get inside with Mark,  and not about condensation, so I don't understand why the need to defend it?

Mark quoted my post about condensation in the parafilm, so I want to be clear what I was talking about. 
I just want clarity to make this info more useful to other members.

8
"It's not going to get in if you wrapped it properly starting from the bottom up and past the top of the rootstock about an inch. "

Well, my veneer graft was for re-work a larger mango, so the top of the root stock is too tall to cover, and I don't think the uncovered rootstock is the problem, but the scion. As the scion sent out new growth, Walter Zill said to uncover it and I agreed with him. So after the top of the scion is uncovered to let the new growth exposed, how do you prevent water get into the two side-channels?

I'm talking about condensation that builds up from within the parafilm, it is perspiration from the plant tissue, not water getting inside from rain or watering.

9
If you are planning to graft in just a couple of days then leave the mango scions out of the fridge. If you are planning to graft in a couple of weeks then i would put them in the fridge. But use only the warmest part of the fridge, which is about 40-50F, And that is the area with the produce bin, usually on the bottom of the fridge.

Thank you for your input Oscar.  Now we know!

10
Yes
"For preventing the water from getting in just cover the hole scions with parafilm"

I did, but I uncovered the top of the scion after it sent out new growth. Then, how do you stop rain going in and pool in there?

No need to cut parafilm.  Leave it alone to decompose on its own.  I've seen scions push thru regular tough vinyl tape.


Yes it's safe to leave the parafilm to fall apart on it's own 95% of the time. 
I have had a few growing grafts die from mold because of the parafilm retaining too much moisture.
If you see heavy condensation inside the parafilm then you should remove or puncture a hole in the parafilm to prevent rotting.

11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Pomelo in general
« on: November 04, 2017, 06:25:39 AM »
I grow a few pummelos in Phoenix AZ on sour orange root stock.  Some of the trees are still young.  This is my experience:

Sarawak - 3rd year in ground.  2nd year fruits are very good.  Flat medium size fruit, thin skin, juicy, good sugar/acid balance with a hint of melon.  The tree is less tolerant of the Phoenix heat/sun than other pummelos and is also less cold hardy.

Tahitian - 2nd year in ground. 1st year fruits are delicious.  Small size fruit, thin skin, sweeter than Sarawak and has lime flavor.  The tree is even less tolerant of heat/sun and cold than Sarawak.  It is suppose to be a smaller tree than Sarawak too.  Tahitian is definitely not identical to Sarawak as some suggest.

Hirado Buntan (Florida origin) - 2nd year in ground. Only 5ft tall and wide, but is holding 8 large mature fruits after I thinned out half the fruits when they were fist size.  1st year fruits are edible, but not good.  I think it will be much better next year.  Large flat fruit, thin skin, lighter red than Chandler, has good heat/sun and cold tolerance for a pummelo.

Chinese Pummelo (four winds growers) - 2nd year in ground but no flowers yet.  Most heat/sun tolerant of my pummelos.  Seems to have good cold tolerance, but I'm not sure it compares to Hirado Buntan.

Chandler - 5 years in ground 20 ft tall tree.  4th year fruits are still inedible!  Can't even compare to 1st year Hirado Buntan fruits.  People in cooler regions have reported bad chandler fruits, but some say that they are good when grown in hotter inland regions.  Well I ain't waiting around for Phoenix to get hotter so I'm going to topwork it to Banpeiyu.


12
I don't think low temperatures are good for mangos, I constantly receive mango scions from Florida some of them travel between 30/45 days in transit and still have a take of 70/80 %, so my advice is a ziploc bag with some vermiculite and very, very few water just to keep humedity inside the bag, that way they can last easily 3/4 weeks...

Wow! that's a long time Raul.  What grafting method do you prefer and are you grafting on mature trees or seedlings?

Raul you let the sender strip the scion leaves 3-4 days before cutting it in order do have the buds swelling?
You usually go with cleft graft?

Yeah that's a very good tip.  I think I saw that on youtube.
It also allows the sap to dry and seal on the cut leave stems, therefore allowing the tree to replenish the sap in the scion before the scion is removed. 
That's what I do with fig cuttings.  More sap equals stronger scion I hope.

13
I've had good takes with mango and avocado sticks that were in the fridge 6 weeks or more.  Viability and success really depends on the conditions of the sticks selected.  For example, if they were clean, firm and green they'll last a long time with a slightly damp piece of paper towel or just a flick of your wet hand into the baggie before sealing.   If they were limp had some black fungi going on, well.......

Ok then, it might have been my grafting skills or the root stock gone dormant for the winter, too.  That's good to know Mark in Texas!

Agreed with grafting mango scions asap though since they don't seem to last as long as other plants.  Especially in the summer heat, which is when people collect mango scions and graft them.

14
There's a lot of mango scion exchanging and mango grafting going on around here :)
What is your experience with storing mango scions?
I got kids and work and sometimes can't graft my scion promptly after receiving them in the mail. 
I store citrus and other hardier scions in the refer for a while to extend their viability, but can mango scions store in the 35F to 39F degree range?

I received some nice mango scions from Oscar that took and stored the extra in the fridge for 2 weeks before I also grafted the extra. 
The extra still looked green and fresh inside and out after 2 weeks in the fridge, but none of them took. 
Maybe they were too cold or maybe they were just too old.  If it's too cold, then would 45F or 50F be ok?
Please share your experience!

Thanks,
Steve

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: White sapote cultivars
« on: October 26, 2017, 02:06:01 AM »
I'm also borderline 9a/b and have to plant my white sapotes in choice spots close to the house to minimize cold damage.  I wish I had more choice spots.
I read that Walton was observed to have the least frost damage than many other varieties planted in the same place in CA. 
Santa Cruz is a large vigorous seedling tree from Santa Cruz, CA where it gets pretty cold for white sapotes.
Vernon seems to take the cold well in my yard.
I'm not sure how they would handle the humidity though.

Yes, spring starts in Feb for us in Phoenix, AZ

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Any Info On The New Ambrosia Mango Tree ?
« on: October 25, 2017, 09:27:39 AM »
Still no feedback on Ambrosia mango.  Must not be worth talking about or just plain forgettable.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: White sapote cultivars
« on: October 25, 2017, 09:24:05 AM »
I would say sometime in Feb right after the last frost.  Similar to citrus.  White sapotes are easy to graft.  Use cleft graft for same size stock/scion.  Use off center cleft if scion is a bit smaller.  Use bark graft, side graft or budding or if stock is too thick.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: White sapote cultivars
« on: October 25, 2017, 06:33:07 AM »
Haha yeah, I would have chopped it down after 5.  Suebelle is not even worth topworking here, but it's what HD and Lowes here stock.  Vernons are less common. 

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: White sapote cultivars
« on: October 24, 2017, 01:32:37 PM »
Read that Rainbow, Walton and Malibu #3 are top tier white sapote varieties in CA.  I got these trees form Bush2Beach last year and am growing them here in Phoenix AZ.  Hope they turn out good!
I also have a nursery bought Vernon fruiting.  It's been in the ground 3 years. 

Vernon does way better than the slow growing Suebelle here in the hot desert.  I've kill many Suebelles before I got the Vernon.  Suebelle is less tolerant of the heat/sun and the cold probably due to it being low vigor and having woolly leaves.  It also takes much longer to start bearing fruit here(I read 8 years)!

20
I would recommend Tommy Atkins based on taste alone.  Just kidding dude, please don't call me stupid.

21
Hi All,

Short story is I'm looking for a CDD Blanc plant and have many fruit tree scions for exchange.

The long story is I got a CDD Gris three years ago and now know that it's not a good choice for Phoenix AZ due to the eye being open. I did my research before and read somewhere that CDD Gris has a closed eye so I went with the Gris. Wrong, it has an open eye here in Phoenix that allows the sour fruit beetle in. These pests don't spare any figs

I should have figured this out a year ago had I not planted the CDD Gris near a large eucalyptus tree. Well I found out figs can't tolerate eucalyptus like the white mulberry can and had to replant it elsewhere. I figured fig and mulberry are related and both have aggressive root systems, so why not. The CDD Gris and a Janice Seedless were totally stunted next to the eucalyptus tree, but grew well after moving them away.

Figs - Col de Dame Noir, Violette de Bordeaux, Desert King, Hardy Chicago, Panache

Pomegranates - Parfianka, Sirenevyi, Angel Red, Ariana, Purple Heart, Granada, Desertnyi, Gissarski Rozovyi, Wonderful

Citrus - sarawak, tahitian pummelo, chinese pomelo, cocktail grapefruit, chandler, moro, sanguinelli, tarocco blood, smith red, trovita, maceterra, jincheng, salustiana, olinda valencia, marrs, minneola, page, daisy seedless, gold nugget, sudachi, meyer, santa teresa, boukhaopza blood, valentine, cara cara, lane late, shiranui / dekopan, hirado buntan pink, wekiwa, oro blanco, sudachi, eustis

Apples - fuji, williams pride, sundowner (cripps red)

Stone fruits - black boy, mid pride, florida prince, eva's pride, tropic snow, santa barbara, august pride, desert dawn, artic star, flavor grenade, splash, emerald drop

Persimmon - giant hanafuyu, fuyu, wase fuyu
Loquat - mcbeth, tanaka, avri, argelino
Mulberry - cooke's pakistan, tice, tehama
Che melonberry
Jujube - sugarcane, shanxi li, sihong, chico, tigertooth, redlands 4, winter delight / mango
Passion Fruit - Frederick, Purple Possum
Guavas - peruvian, mexican cream, ong, arabian, taiwan, tikal, bassateen edfina
Pineapple Guava - nazemetz, mammoth
Star fruit - kari, fwang tung, sri kembegang
White Sapote - vernon, rainbow, malibu #3, walton, redlands, nettie
Sapodilla - alano, silas woods
Mango - mallika, carrie, Maha Chanok, duncan, fairchild, pickering, ice cream, amrapali, edgar
Kohala Longan
Jambolan (java plum)
Guabiju
Wampee - Chi Hsin (guy sam / chicken heart), Seedless
Imbe
Monkey Orange - spiny(Strychnos Spinosa), corky bark (Strychnos cocculoides)
Mexican Garcinia (Luc's)
Psidium Guineense
Pitangatuba
Orangeberry (Gin Berry)
Marula - female, male
Guamuchil

Thanks,
Steve

22
Yes it is marula.  My seedlings last year looked the same.
If my seedlings survive my 9a/9b zone cold and phoenix heat down the road we can exchange scions.
Judging by how long it took you to get a reply, marula seedlings are probably not that desirable.  Too bad choice cultivars are not available here.

23
I hope someone has some info on Ambrosia mango eventually in this topic.

24
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Manila mango seeds wanted
« on: October 29, 2016, 08:03:16 PM »
I'm looking for Manila mango seeds to plant.  Only Manila will do, not ataulfo, champagne or honey.
 I only found ataulfo and champagne fruit in stores.  Trade or buy is ok.

25
If you have a Novak loquat tree you can ship to Arizona or scion wood.  I'm willing to trade or buy.
I have many temperate and tropical fruit trees:
 
Figs - Col de Dame Noir, Violette de Bordeaux, Peters Honey, Hardy Chicago, Panache,
 
Pomegranates - Parfianka, Sirenevyi, Angel Red, Ariana, Purple Heart, Granada, Desertnyi, Gissarski Rozovyi
 
Citrus - tahitian / sarawak pummelo, hirado buntan pink, chinese pomelo, cocktail grapefruit, chandler, moro, tarocco blood, trovita, maceterra, jincheng, salustiana, olinda valencia, marrs, minneola, page, daisy seedless, gold nugget, kishu seedless, sudachi, meyer, santa teresa, boukhaopza blood, rotuma island, valentine, cara cara, shiranui / dekopan
 
Apples - fuji, williams pride, goldrush, king david, king of tompkins county, sundowner (cripps red)
 
Stone fruits - black boy, may pride, florida prince, eva's pride, red baron, tropic snow, santa barbara, august pride, earlitreat, artic star, flavor grenade, splash, flavor delight, spice zee, weeping santa rosa, emerald drop
 
Pears - hosui, shinko, shin li, raja, seuri, yoinashi
Persimmon - hana fuyu, izu, chocolate, suruga
Loquat - mcbeth, tanaka, avri
Mulberry - cooke's pakistan, white, dwarf everbearing, persian, noir de sapin
Jujube - sugarcane, shanxi li, winter delight / mango
Passion Fruit - Frederick, Purple Possum
Guavas - barbie pink, peruvian, mexican cream, many more
Pineapple Guava - nazemetz, mammoth
Star fruit - kari, fwang tung, sri kembegang
White Sapote - vernon, rainbow, malibu #3, walton, nettie, redlands
Sapodilla - alano, silas woods, hasya
Mango - lemon zest, coconut cream, sweet tart, mallika, carrie, Maha Chanok
Kohala Longan
Jambolan (java plum)
Guabiju
Chi Hsin Wampee (guy sam / chicken heart)
Imbe
Monkey Orange - spiny(Strychnos Spinosa), corky bark (Strychnos cocculoides)
Mexican Garcinia (Luc's)
Psidium Guineense
Pitangatuba
Eugenia Candolleana
Orangeberry (Gin Berry)
Lucuma - de seda, de palo
Marula - female, male


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