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Messages - Daintree

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 18
1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is this cocoplum?
« on: September 11, 2018, 07:57:43 PM »
Yeah, I want that now...

Carolyn

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What is it?
« on: September 10, 2018, 09:44:42 AM »
Maybe Euphorbia lophogona or a close relative?

Carolyn

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Why won’t my miracle berry produce fruit?
« on: September 08, 2018, 12:39:54 AM »
I potted mine in straight peat moss, perlite and pine bark.  Then it gets some fast-acting sulfur for potted plants and regular old Miracle Gro. It is in part shade in my greenhouse, and makes more berries than I can give away.  I keep it wet, but not sopping.

But, the last plant I had only made two berries.  So I'm not sure what I am doing differently now, other than being heavy on the acid.

Carolyn

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: why do my jackfruit seedlings always fail?
« on: September 07, 2018, 03:23:10 PM »
Here are some photos.
Do you think they need bigger pots? You can't see the pots very well in the picture, but they are about 6 inches deep.
And, I can add more perlite tot he mix if they need a lighter soil.

Thanks!




5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / why do my jackfruit seedlings always fail?
« on: September 07, 2018, 01:42:39 PM »
So, I buy jackfruit from the local Asian market. If it tastes good (I like them sweet and crunchy), I plant the seeds.
They always sprout and do really well until they are about a foot tall.
Then all the leaves fall off and they die.
Sometimes the leaves turn yellow, but this problem has been fixed by keeping my water acidified down to about 6.0.
But sometimes, the leaves are still green, and they just fall off.
I keep them wet but not in standing water, and in full sun.
I have moved the three remaining seedlings into shade and they seem to be doing better.
Any thoughts or ideas?
I'd take a picture, but all I have right now are healthy plants...

Thanks!

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Are Forgotten Crops the Future of Food?
« on: August 27, 2018, 05:35:15 PM »
I have a great book called "Living With the Trees of Life", by Roger Leakey, and it talks about agroforestry as a way to increase food security world-wide.  The number of things that we CAN eat, that are good for us, compared to what we DO eat, is enormous! Really interesting!

7
I believe it is about 3 years old.
Here is the only picture I took of the fruit. That was probably two months ago.  Still green and hard when we left.  It didn't occur to my sis that I would want pictures of the ripe fruit, or that she might want to try it, so she just watched my little parrots eat at it once it fell.  It was totally rotten, with bird eaten parts on it, when we got back.  Just need to wait for it to bloom again!  it is about 3 ft tall.



8
Aargh!
Been away for a month, and missed the ripening/falling of my very first Psidium striatulum fruit!
It was worth it, because we were in Alabama visiting our brand new granddaughter  :), but still a bummer since I did't get to taste it.
I thought it smelled heavenly, even rotten.  Hubby thought it smelled like gym shoes  :(
I found it in the pot and salvaged the seeds.  I'll plant them tomorrow and with any luck I'll have a bunch of seedlings!

Carolyn

9
Yeah, I just took a look at that list for the first time (not living in California, it never really interested me). Over 1,000 items on it, ranging from aspirin, betel nut and goldenseal, to marijuana smoke and Chinese-style salted fish!

Luckily, pizza was NOT on the list, so I'm off to Take-and-Bake place!

Carolyn

 

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: capers won't set fruit
« on: July 27, 2018, 01:15:12 AM »
I have been treating mine like my other wetland tropicals. 
I will water it when I do the fig trees from now on.

Carolyn

11
So, we are updating our homeowners insurance "rider" tomorrow. Things like our musical instruments, china, etc. Does anyone have their PLANTS insured?  Maybe you can't do that. No idea.
I am just thinking, that if a huge tree falls on our greenhouse (which IS covered), what about all my plants inside?
Anyway, just wondering how other folks handle this...

Cheers!
Carolyn

12
Yes, I have gotten all the seeds inside the stone to germinate. Don't break the shell open and try to plant the seeds, just carefully pry out the "lid" over each "eye". I scraped the shell with the blade of my pocket knife until I could locate the eye, then pried the lid off each one.  Once you get the lid off, you will notice that there is a papery membrane over each seed. You don't want to break that membrane.  A pocket knife blade works really well. Poke the tip into the crack between the lid and the shell, but not too far.  Just a tiny bit. Then pry.  Think of it as opening a REALLY full paint can, and trying to carefully pry the lid off without spilling or touching any paint. I ruined the first seed, but once you get the hang of it, it is easy.

Carolyn


13
The sources I have read treat it as fact, so I hoping that is the case.  Never can tell sometimes!
So, I still have several marula seeds left from the ones I got a few years ago. I have them marked as to male and female. Sadly, I didn't hear the odd/even eye thing until after I had planted mine.  I selected the strongest to keep, and I don't know it's sex, but MOST of the seeds I planted had two eyes (I remember, since I spent so long carefully prying the eyes out with my pocket knife!). Because of the size of my greenhouse, I only have room for one marula.  Once it blooms, I will see if it is male of female, then plant a seed of the opposite sex, grow it up a while and graft it to my big tree.
Or, if there are other folks growing marula, maybe we can swap scions. How old are they to bloom?

Cheers!
Carolyn

14
I do have some Osmocote Plus. I will give them a bit when I pot them up.

Thanks!
Carolyn

15
Thanks!
Keep them moist, and no fertilizer - got it!
I have a couple of other trees that can't tolerate any fertilizer, so I will put the baby jacks on my list of trees to not fertilize.
Elitebettas, how big are your pots?

Carolyn

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Want to do Jackfruit right this time...
« on: June 30, 2018, 11:32:49 AM »
This is my fourth shot at jackfruit.  I bought a really sweet, creamy jackfruit from the local Asian market and planted the seeds.  They are just starting to sprout, and I am trying to nip a problem in the bud before it happens AGAIN.

Every time I try to grow jackfruit (always from seed from store-bought fruit), they do great for a while, then when they are about 2 ft tall they start looking deficient in something (looks like potassium or magnesium?), drop all their leaves and die.
I am just stumped.  I have zone 10 and zone 12 greenhouses.  I use a good quality, fast-draining potting mix, feed regularly but not heavily, and I can give them any size pot they want, up to about 30 gallons. I don't know why they aren't happy! I have a lot of other tropicals (cacao, all sorts of annonas and guavas) that I have had no problem with, but I really struggle with jackfruit (and mango and lychee).
I read something in a post a few years ago about pruning the taproot. Thoughts on that?
Any advice on amount of water/nutrients/light for young jackfruit?

Thanks!

Carolyn

17
Two inches.  I hope that is big enough to feed the fruit.  I waited until this year (it is 3 years old) to give it a bit more growth.  I am only pollinating flowers on the lower part of the trunk, and not the branches.

Carolyn

18
Well, after weeks of hand pollinating my theobroma cacao, using a jewelers loop and tweezers, I finally got two fruit to set on!  One dropped off right away, but the other is still hanging in there so far.  I think I am finally getting better at pollinating this really tricky flower. Even if this one drops, I am excited to know I CAN do it!


Also, my narrow leaf guava (Psidium striatum) has set on a fruit!  Yay!

19
Millet,
Can you please put all your citrus knowledge in a book?  That way, I can carry it out to my greenhouse, and not have to drag my iPad out there and search for the correct topic on the Forum.
 
I have a good digital SLR camera - I would volunteer to shoot the pictures for the book, in exchange for a first edition copy... :) :) :)

Carolyn

20
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Seeds shipped into US
« on: June 20, 2018, 08:52:48 AM »
Hi,
Yes, you complete the permit process, then they email you the permit and green/yellow labels, which you then can email to the seller (don't email them the whole sheet of stickers - just one!).  Process takes several weeks, and I believe they use e-verify, or some other form of ID and background check.  It is all done online (used to be I had to take a copy of my ID into the local USDA office). If you look at the answer from Dominik, he provided a link to the USDA website. Click on that link, then scroll down to PPQ 587 and click on the "plants for planting" link. Gives you all the info, plus another link to apply for the permit.  Here is a tip (and there are previous strings detailing this also) - when you apply, you HAVE to say what seeds you will be importing, where they are coming from, and what designated ports they will arrive to the US at. I marked all the ports, although my stickers are for the SeaTac Washington location. The USDA folks are awesome there! For countries of origin, I said "various approved countries" and for the type of seeds I stated "eligible taxa".  What that means is that you DO have to do a bit of research and not order anything that is restricted or from an ineligible country (Cuba, for example).
It is a pretty easy permit to get, and it is good for 3 years.  You can have things mailed to you.  You can carry them in your luggage ONLY if you enter the country in Seattle during working hours.  SeaTac is the only entry point where the USDA inspection station is IN the airport...
Have fun!
Carolyn

21
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Seeds shipped into US
« on: June 19, 2018, 09:04:39 AM »
Both replies are correct - to be legal, you must have a USDA permit, and a copy of the permit must be enclosed in the package, along with a list of the seeds and where they were collected.  Additionally, there is a little green and yellow sticker that goes on the front of the package, and that sends the package to the USDA.  Then they forward it on to you after they make sure there are no "nasty beasties" inside. The permit is free.  When I order seeds, I email a copy of my permit, seed list for them to fill out, and a color copy of the green package label, and ask the seller to fill out the list (sometimes I do it ahead of time, to make sure botanical names are correct and readable, since that can hold up a delivery) enclose the list and permit in the package, and print a COLOR copy of the label and attach it to the package.  The only thing that ever goes wrong is that they don't have access to a color printer... 

On the other hand, it is pretty common to just order seeds and have them shipped over.  I would guess the odds of the package not getting seized is maybe 50-50, or maybe even better.  So I guess it depends on how much the seeds cost and how big the fine is, if there is one, as to whether you want to risk it.

Carolyn

22
Ok, off topic, just a little, but I LOVE my Cape Gooseberry!  Where did you get the Jaltomata cajacayensis seeds?  Seems I am collecting more and more solanums...

Right now I am growing a "mystery" solanum from Cameroon.  Once it flowers, I am hoping to identify it and not have to wait until it fruits.  In Cameroon, they eat the greens, not the berries.  It is similar to garden huckleberry, but I think it may be something different. Oooh.... aaaah....

Carolyn

23
Boy, just when I thought I already knew it all, plants surprise me yet again!

24
I thought this was interesting -
I have two types of tamarillo in my greenhouse, and both emit an odor that smells like creosote, or asphalt.  Not pleasant for most folks, but I kind of like it, in a weird way.
Both my solanum betaceum and my solanum sibundoyense are absolute fungus gnat magnets.  Since the leaves and stems are covered with tiny hairs, the gnats don't seem to be able to escape, so in essence, they are acting like giant sundews, or some other "sticky" carnivorous plant.  They are helping me out, but I wonder if they are getting anything out of the deal - do you suppose they can get nutrition out of the gnats?? I wish they would attract whiteflies also!




Carolyn

25
Hi,
I grow various tomatoes in my greenhouse.  In general, all tomatoes are perennials, although I have only ever grown indeterminate ones year-to-year. Supposedly the determinate ones die after the fruit ripens.  Indeterminate varieties DO keep growing also, so keep it pruned down. As far as tiny tomatoes, Isis Candy is really good, and I have also grown Matt's Wild Cherry, which is supposedly THE sweetest cherry tomato.  I have a chocolate cherry tomato going now. When you buy plants or seeds, just check to see if they are indeterminate.  Same holds true for the larger tomatoes.  Anything that tastes good and says "indeterminate" on the tag will give you years of gardening pleasure.  They will fruit less and less as the years go on, and although I once had a 6 year tomato plant, it didn't give many tomatoes by that time, so it went to the compost pile (which then sprouted about a hundred volunteer plants!).

Cheers!
Carolyn

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