Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Daintree

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 15
1
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Wanted exotic for cold climate
« on: January 28, 2018, 10:16:39 AM »
If you are looking for something exotic-looking and tasty, why not go with our North American native, paw-paw?

Carolyn

2
I sit in my greenhouse and read the Logees catalogue to my plants!

Carolyn

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cold protection tropicals
« on: January 06, 2018, 06:00:46 PM »
Frost blankets work way better than sheets.  The heavier the better. 

Carolyn

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Want A Nice Container For Your Tree?
« on: January 06, 2018, 04:27:34 PM »
Wow! It sure it pretty!  I wonder what the shipping cost is at that weight!

5
I think that the acquisition of a seed would be less of a monetary problem, and more of a species survival problem. 

As I understand it, the seeds are very tightly regulated, and viable seeds may be distributed to botanical gardens that can assure survival of their specimens to help prevent species extinction. Your best chance, although slim, would be to prove that you can keep your population alive for the length of time it takes them to fruit.  And if your specimen turns out to be male, be prepared to collect and ship pollen to a garden with a single female.  (Ooo... maybe you could start a Coco de mer 'dating' website...).

Although they may not have seeds themselves, you may want to try contacting the Seychelles Island Foundation. Their website is http://www.sif.sc

Good luck!

Carolyn

6
My tropical house stays at 50+, and this year it hasn't gotten lower than 55.  But I have mangosteen and cacao out there, plus some weird things from Cameroon that really hate anything lower than about 50. 

I have 5 fans that blow straight down, but they don't blow hard, just a gentle breeze.  My furnace is mounted at about 4 ft and it blows straight out fairly hard, so that tends to keep heat more down where I need it.

The orangerie will get down into the high 30's , but bottomed out so far this year at 48.  But I think we are actually warmer here than you folks are right now! Our lowest this winter was 17, and it has been in the 20's at night and high 30's to low 40's during the day for the last couple of weeks.

Stay warm, all you Southern folks!!

Carolyn

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fast growth rate megathread
« on: January 04, 2018, 10:13:46 PM »
My 2 year old coffee plants routinely fruit, and I think you can shorten the timeline on moringa also.  I was harvesting leaves like crazy after 9 months, and they flowered in a year.
You could probably bring in a huge number of 3 gallon citrus trees that will fruit that year.

Good luck!

Carolyn

8
Karen, this is SO exciting! Any idea when we will be able to come visit the completed dome and see the fruits of your labors???

Carolyn

9
Hey Mark, VERY cool variegated fruits! 

The rollinia you gave me seems to be quite happy and has doubled in size. 
I put it down in my book as rollinia deliciosa - that is correct, isn't it?

Stay warm down there!

Carolyn

10
Happy New Year and Blessed Holidays to all my fruity friends!

Carolyn

11
The Commonwealth of North Daintree, a micronation located in my backyard greenhouse in Boise Idaho, NEVER freezes!
It is the happiest, coziest, most peaceful country on earth. Home to 150 trees, two humans, five birds, and ten million red wigglers.



Happy New Year to all, and may all your "plantasies" come true!

12
Interesting!
Thank you!

Carolyn

13
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Lime ID help Label says Tohai
« on: December 29, 2017, 07:38:45 PM »
Yeah, I bet it is Kaffir lime, also known as Thai lime.  Maybe the "O" in "Tohai" went to a party and came home on the wrong label...

Carolyn

14
Most/all of my citrus appear to be grafted.  I have bought them from local garden stores, and some from a place in Oregon. Mark in Texas recently found out that my finger lime is grafted onto flying dragon.  This made me wonder what the others are grafted onto.  Is there a "standard" or "usual" rootstock that is used? Just curious...

Carolyn

15
If I remember right, the problem with the lack of UV in Biosphere 2 was that the bees they had as pollinators couldn't navigate.

I think what killed the pollinators (ALL their pollinators died quite quickly, but native fire ants and cockroaches flourished!) was the drop in oxygen levels, and wildly fluctuating CO2 levels. Luckily you shouldn't have the problem of native ants sneaking in to your facility.  This new one is a flow-through system, and not a "locked in", where you have to generate your own oxygen, correct?  So you won't have to deal with carbon sequestration on a huge level.

16
Karen, what is the dome made out of?  Glass or poly?  Having read the books written but the original biome folks in Arizona, and visited it several times, one of the things they had not counted on was the fact that because glass blocks UV rays, they could grown greenery really well, but had trouble getting things to fruit.  That is why they could grow sweet potato so well, since it is a shade-lover.  They ate so many of them, that their skin actually turned orange.

So even though part of the dome will have lots of SUN, it may not have enough of the light the plants need.  So I would try and aim for plants that will fruit in shade, but tolerate the sunny side of the dome. I have had good luck with lots of berries, such as strawberries, blueberries, gooseberries etc.  My tomatoes, although they prefer full sun, do flower and fruit all winter in my greenhouse.  Coffee and cacao, and probably lots of other understory tropicals, do well in the shade. I have also fruited plums and pears in shade. Annuals and short-lived perennials can fill in while trees are growing, and you are so right about starting these plants WAY before the dome goes up!  And don't forget mushrooms. Super good for you, and awesome composters.

You are going to have so much fun with this!!!!!

Carolyn

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Yay! My first pitangatuba fruit!
« on: November 29, 2017, 11:08:35 PM »
There are other little fruits set on, so I will pay close attention! 
This one, to me, tasted like a cross between apricot and deviled chicken!  My hubby thought it tasted like a fruity piece of toast...

Very fragrant! I was expecting it to be tart, but maybe it was too ripe? At any rate, it was still fun!  My tree is about 4 ft tall, and was grown from seed almost exactly 4 years ago. It has flowered profusely for the last couple of years, but no fruit, so I was totally taken aback when this one dropped.

Not bad for Idaho!

Carolyn

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Yay! My first pitangatuba fruit!
« on: November 29, 2017, 05:46:36 PM »
Apparently my pitangatuba fruited and I never noticed until the fruit dropped.  It is sort of buried in the back of the greenhouse, so is hard to see all around it (another good reason why we are enlarging the greenhouse this spring, yet again...).
First one, of hopefully many more.  It was a bit mushy, but we ate it anyway! Then planted the seed, of course!



Carolyn

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Spondias germination
« on: November 28, 2017, 06:52:35 PM »
Because the seeds look prickly, I am guessing that they are spondias dulcis. Anxious to hear if you get any to germinate, as I would like to grow sponidas dulcis also.  Does anyone have experience growing this variety in a container?


Carolyn

20
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Warm Water For Winter Greenhouse Irrigation
« on: November 25, 2017, 06:49:44 PM »
I use a 300 watt fish tank heater in my greenhouse pond in the winter, which I fill with our tap water, then filter.  Way more expensive than what Millet does, but much easier on my back! 
I heat the water to about 80 degrees, and my tropicals love it.  I only have to do that in the winter, since in the summer, it gets warm enough on its own.
However, I do plan on putting gutters on my greenhouse this spring to start collecting what little rain we get. 

Carolyn

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Lights????
« on: November 18, 2017, 10:45:14 PM »
The new branches may be weaker without wind, but all my citrus are in a greenhouse with just a fan, and seem to do just fine. 
As far as light goes, I have priced it out and the grow lights and LEDS just have not come down in price enough to justify the cost, for me.
You might want to switch to fluorescent shop lights.  The fixtures and bulbs are all cheap.  I can't get T5 shop light fixtures at Home Depot yet, but as soon as they carry them, I am switching from my current T8s.  When I started my greenhouse, I could only get T12s.  The times they are a changin'.  Here is a great article from the Univ. of Alaska extension.  You may have already seen it  I have posted the link before.  I guess if anyone knows about needing supplemental light, it is Alaska.

http://www.alaskaagresources.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/vandre_fluorescent_lights_for_plant_growth_1991.pdf

Carolyn


22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hunting the elusive Delicious Monster
« on: November 16, 2017, 10:19:55 AM »
I loved mine when I grew it in my greenhouse, and ate the fruit all the time.  I finally ripped it out, since it was taking over the entires greenhouse and blocking the sun from all the other plants!

Carolyn

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Dragon fruit plant in pot
« on: November 12, 2017, 07:46:07 PM »
Awesome!  I am totally copying you!

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Custom question
« on: November 07, 2017, 07:46:23 PM »
Or call the USDA.  I have found them to be VERY helpful.

Carolyn

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is a leafless jaboticaba always dead?
« on: November 07, 2017, 07:45:23 PM »
Thanks all!  I will not repot it for a while.  I have it in the greenhouse now, in a slightly shady location near the humidifier.
I also brought back allspice, avocado, lychee, macadamia, mango, miracle fruit and rollinia.

Except for the rollinia, which I got from forum member Mark in Texas, they all came from Lukas Nursery in Oviedo. We were on our way to tour the Kennedy Space Center, so it was ideally located.  That was as far south as we got.  They did not have a big selection of varieties, but they were very nice and helpful even though they were still rebuilding from the bad weather. Plus, the chance of buying of ANY of these trees in Idaho is exactly zero.

Put 7,000 miles on the van, but we had fun.  I even swam with manatees. Dorky tourist thing but hey, it was on my bucket list, so I'm happy.

Cheers,
Carolyn

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 15
Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers