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Topics - Daintree

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / using neem oil for cercospora leaf spot?
« on: October 20, 2018, 04:46:54 PM »
I have a couple of plants in my greenhouse that appear to have cercospora leaf spot.
I was going to try neem oil on them, but I worry because they are tropical solanums, and have very large, soft, hairy leaves.
Has anyone has luck with using neem oil on these?
Or any other ideas?

Thanks!

Carolyn

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / why do my jackfruit seedlings always fail?
« on: September 07, 2018, 01:42:39 PM »
So, I buy jackfruit from the local Asian market. If it tastes good (I like them sweet and crunchy), I plant the seeds.
They always sprout and do really well until they are about a foot tall.
Then all the leaves fall off and they die.
Sometimes the leaves turn yellow, but this problem has been fixed by keeping my water acidified down to about 6.0.
But sometimes, the leaves are still green, and they just fall off.
I keep them wet but not in standing water, and in full sun.
I have moved the three remaining seedlings into shade and they seem to be doing better.
Any thoughts or ideas?
I'd take a picture, but all I have right now are healthy plants...

Thanks!

3
Aargh!
Been away for a month, and missed the ripening/falling of my very first Psidium striatulum fruit!
It was worth it, because we were in Alabama visiting our brand new granddaughter  :), but still a bummer since I did't get to taste it.
I thought it smelled heavenly, even rotten.  Hubby thought it smelled like gym shoes  :(
I found it in the pot and salvaged the seeds.  I'll plant them tomorrow and with any luck I'll have a bunch of seedlings!

Carolyn

4
So, we are updating our homeowners insurance "rider" tomorrow. Things like our musical instruments, china, etc. Does anyone have their PLANTS insured?  Maybe you can't do that. No idea.
I am just thinking, that if a huge tree falls on our greenhouse (which IS covered), what about all my plants inside?
Anyway, just wondering how other folks handle this...

Cheers!
Carolyn

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Want to do Jackfruit right this time...
« on: June 30, 2018, 11:32:49 AM »
This is my fourth shot at jackfruit.  I bought a really sweet, creamy jackfruit from the local Asian market and planted the seeds.  They are just starting to sprout, and I am trying to nip a problem in the bud before it happens AGAIN.

Every time I try to grow jackfruit (always from seed from store-bought fruit), they do great for a while, then when they are about 2 ft tall they start looking deficient in something (looks like potassium or magnesium?), drop all their leaves and die.
I am just stumped.  I have zone 10 and zone 12 greenhouses.  I use a good quality, fast-draining potting mix, feed regularly but not heavily, and I can give them any size pot they want, up to about 30 gallons. I don't know why they aren't happy! I have a lot of other tropicals (cacao, all sorts of annonas and guavas) that I have had no problem with, but I really struggle with jackfruit (and mango and lychee).
I read something in a post a few years ago about pruning the taproot. Thoughts on that?
Any advice on amount of water/nutrients/light for young jackfruit?

Thanks!

Carolyn

6
Well, after weeks of hand pollinating my theobroma cacao, using a jewelers loop and tweezers, I finally got two fruit to set on!  One dropped off right away, but the other is still hanging in there so far.  I think I am finally getting better at pollinating this really tricky flower. Even if this one drops, I am excited to know I CAN do it!


Also, my narrow leaf guava (Psidium striatum) has set on a fruit!  Yay!

7
I thought this was interesting -
I have two types of tamarillo in my greenhouse, and both emit an odor that smells like creosote, or asphalt.  Not pleasant for most folks, but I kind of like it, in a weird way.
Both my solanum betaceum and my solanum sibundoyense are absolute fungus gnat magnets.  Since the leaves and stems are covered with tiny hairs, the gnats don't seem to be able to escape, so in essence, they are acting like giant sundews, or some other "sticky" carnivorous plant.  They are helping me out, but I wonder if they are getting anything out of the deal - do you suppose they can get nutrition out of the gnats?? I wish they would attract whiteflies also!




Carolyn

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / My Njangsa is finally up!
« on: June 16, 2018, 10:40:08 PM »
Yay! My Njangsa (Ricinodendron heudelotii) is up! Two out of the six seeds have sprouted. Two rotted, one I accidentally broke the root off of when transplanting and it died  :'( , and I am still hoping the last one sprouts.  In the wild it is a very large tree, so we will see how it takes to container culture...

Here is a picture! Anyone else growing this?


Carolyn

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / capers won't set fruit
« on: June 10, 2018, 11:49:54 AM »
Does anyone have experience with caper bushes?  I only have one in my greenhouse.  It is flowering profusely but won't set fruit.  I go out in the morning and try to help things along by hand, but still no fruit set.
Any ideas?

Thanks!

Carolyn

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Is this REALLY gynura procumbens?
« on: June 04, 2018, 03:39:02 PM »
Hello,
This plant was given to me as 'longevity spinach', gynura procumbens.
But, depending on the website I look at for these names, I get different plants.
This is not a vine.  It is sprawling, and weakly climbing if propped up.
The older stems are thick and tough, but I wouldn't quite call them 'woody', and purple with green spots.
The younger stems are five-sided, green and succulent.
The young leaves are serrated, but as the get older and larger they look more undulate.

I want to make sure of what it is before I start eating it...

Thanks!
Carolyn

older stem at base of plant

older stem

younger stem and leaf

young leaf

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Should I train my cambuca?
« on: May 20, 2018, 10:50:21 AM »
I have two cambuca trees that are 5 years old.  They seem happy and healthy, but they have a very low, spreading habit.  They are only about 1 ft high, but 3 ft wide.  Very leafy and healthy looking. They are in pots in my greenhouse.
Should I be training them to a more upright position, or just let them go as they are? Some of the branches actually hang lower than the edge of the 10 gallon pots they are in.

Thanks!
Carolyn

12
Citrus General Discussion / Super absorbent polymer from orange peels!
« on: April 28, 2018, 12:40:09 PM »
"Old" news, but still really cool!
A teenager from South Africa won the 2016 Google science fair by developing a biodegradable SAP in her home kitchen using orange peels, avocado skins and lemon juice. The only other things used were time, sunshine, and electricity (for her stove).

Sure hope this pans out, for South Africa AND the world.  Put me on the list to buy some, but for now, I think I will try and make my own.  I certainly produce lots of citrus peels (not all orange, so I will be curious to see if I get similar results with a mix of lemon, lime and orange) and avocado skins.  My worms can't eat either one, so "wahoo!"

This girl has a great sense of humor, also.  Check out the required "health and safety" portion of her entry.
I wonder how her current experiments are going...

https://www.googlesciencefair.com/projects/en/2016/deb654bce83b15eed364f52fa8685634649014602eca78858c58fec00aa6041a

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / super absorbent polymer from orange peels!
« on: April 28, 2018, 12:31:06 PM »
"Old" news, but still really cool!
A teenager from South Africa won the 2016 Google science fair by developing a biodegradable SAP in her home kitchen using orange peels, avocado skins and lemon juice. The only other things used were time, sunshine, and electricity (for her stove).

Sure hope this pans out, for South Africa AND the world.  Put me on the list to buy some, but for now, I think I will try and make my own.  I certainly produce lots of citrus peels (not all orange, so I will be curious to see if I get similar results with a mix of lemon, lime and orange) and avocado skins.  My worms can't eat either one, so "wahoo!"

This girl has a great sense of humor, also.  Check out the required "health and safety" portion of her entry.
I wonder how her current experiments are going...

https://www.googlesciencefair.com/projects/en/2016/deb654bce83b15eed364f52fa8685634649014602eca78858c58fec00aa6041a

14
Citrus General Discussion / Why are my Washington Navel Oranges white?
« on: March 12, 2018, 05:03:52 PM »
I just picked my Washington navel oranges.  Some split, so I picked them all.
The skin is a light yellow/green.  The flesh is pure white, like a white grapefruit.
They taste super sweet and are extremely juicy, but have a very slightly bitter after-taste.
My bergamot oranges were very pale also.
The cara cares are not ripe yet.
The lemons, limes and finger limes always come out really well, but these are my first batches of oranges.

What did I do wrong?  They are in my greenhouse with the other citrus.

Thanks!
Carolyn

15
Most/all of my citrus appear to be grafted.  I have bought them from local garden stores, and some from a place in Oregon. Mark in Texas recently found out that my finger lime is grafted onto flying dragon.  This made me wonder what the others are grafted onto.  Is there a "standard" or "usual" rootstock that is used? Just curious...

Carolyn

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Yay! My first pitangatuba fruit!
« on: November 29, 2017, 05:46:36 PM »
Apparently my pitangatuba fruited and I never noticed until the fruit dropped.  It is sort of buried in the back of the greenhouse, so is hard to see all around it (another good reason why we are enlarging the greenhouse this spring, yet again...).
First one, of hopefully many more.  It was a bit mushy, but we ate it anyway! Then planted the seed, of course!



Carolyn

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Is a leafless jaboticaba always dead?
« on: November 07, 2017, 08:52:02 AM »
So, I bought some trees in Florida two weeks ago, and put them in our car for the trip,back to Idaho. I have 8 trees, and have been very careful with watering and misting, and bringing them into the hotels if it would be too hot or cold in the car. Everyone looks great and is traveling well except the jabo, which has dropped ALL her leaves.  They never turned brown. Some got a little dry, but for the most part she just shed like a dog in spring.
We are arriving home today, and I plan on tucking her into the greenhouse with the others. Soil is still damp. Should I give extra light? Extra humidity? Any special fertilizer? How long do I give her before I decide she has expired?

Thanks! Carolyn

18
So, we are traveling back to Idaho from Florida with a van full of trees. One that I bought is Miracle Fruit.  I have had notoriously bad luck with these in the past, with it slowly defoliating and dying. But, third time's a charm! Can anyone recommend a good way to acidify potting soil? Most sulphur brands I look at don't have a dosing guideline for pots. Is sulphur the best way to go? How low should I go, and how long do I wait to test the soil to see how acidic it has become? The plant I bought is in a 3 gallon pot that is only half full of soil, so I'll have to do something fairly soon.
It will be in a pot for the winter, and hopefully everything in my greenhouse will be going into rootbuilder pots, but I am going to track the soil temps in the greenhouse this winter first, to make sure I don't everything when they start to go into the native soil.

Thanks!
Carolyn

19
Hi,
I am looking for bitter leaf seed, small plants or cuttings.

Thanks!

Carolyn

20
We are traveling to Florida beginning next week, and I wanted to shop at a tropical fruit nursery (allspice, june plum, grumichama, etc).  We won't be getting as far south as the Miami area, and am frantically trying to find a nursery selling tropical fruit trees as far north as possible.  I am trying to avoid having to pay the huge shipping fees to Idaho.

We will also be in south Texas, if there are any there.

Anybody have any suggestions?????????

Thanks!
Carolyn

21
Ok folks, sorry this is not fruit-related, but here is a pic of the total solar eclipse! I did eat a home-grown banana while waiting, if that counts...

Nobody knows for sure where he went for the eclipse, but Neil Degrasse Tyson had ice cream at a place two blocks from our house.  Only famous person ever to eat at Delsa's.

Carolyn

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / My greenhouse website
« on: July 21, 2017, 06:59:51 PM »
I am putting up a little website for my greenhouse.  I don't have all the pictures up yet, but I do have almost all of my plants listed.

Check it out at daintree-arboretum.com

Thanks!

Carolyn


23
So my hubby proudly brought home a little bag of lychees from our little Walmart neighborhood market yesterday!  And you know what, they are pretty darned tasty! There was also a jackfruit (at a hefty $25) at Albertson's last week, but by the time I ran home and got my money and came back, it was gone.

And I remember the days when the fruit selection consisted only of apples, pears and grapes...

Love that global economy!

Carolyn

24
Hi All,
I am growing a few plants in my greenhouse that are not generally known in cultivation.  Trying to sort out their nutrient needs has been a challenge.  In particular, a couple of my dacryodes edulis were looking funky, and none of the online pictures pointed me in the right direction.

There is a local lab that does plant tissue analysis for crops and trees, so I took some samples in to them.  I had one tree that was doing well, and one that was looking horrible.  Turned out the bad one had several issues, including an iron overload (comparing the "happy" plant to the "unhappy" plant), although I do not use much iron at all.  Some of these jungle trees seem to prefer poor soil, I guess! I have found that soil analysis doesn't help much, since the soil may be fine, but it doesn't have what THAT plant needs, or has too much of it. For example, in healthy, nitrogen-rich soil, my cinnamon isn't happy.  Less nitrogen, happy cinnamon! Plus, because I use a high-quality potting mix and my plants are in containers, there is far less of an issue with soil problems compared to plants in the ground.

Anyway, I am now in the process of taking other "healthy" samples in to have them tested, and try to establish a baseline for what they need.  It is still sort of a crapshoot, since a plant can be in the process of suffering, but not showing symptoms yet, but over time, I am hoping to establish what "normal" is for some of these plants.

So, my question is - Is there someplace where I can find baseline tissue analysis (not soil) reports for some of these plants, so I don't pay to reinvent the wheel?  Namely, cherimoya, soursop, custard apple, ice cream bean and theobroma cacao. 

The lab I use tests for nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, zinc, copper, manganese, iron and boron.  I realize that different labs may use different testing methods, but they usually state what methods they use, so the results may still be helpful.

Thanks!

Carolyn

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / How do you pronounce cassabanana?
« on: April 20, 2017, 07:11:40 PM »
So, I am growing some cassabanana, and am curious how to pronounce it.
Is it casa banana? ("house banana..."?)
Or cassaba nana? ("melon grandma"...?)
When I tell people what it is, they keep trying to make it be some sort of banana variety...


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