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Author Topic: Excellent write up on the myth of adding mychorzzial products and discussions  (Read 899 times)

ricshaw

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If your soil analysis suggests the need for the minerals they may provide, then go for it.  I don't see any value myself.  The analysis is Na, Cl, (who needs table salt), a little Mg and K and a lot of Ca.

I think it's another feel-good thing with folks who forked out money seeing what they expect to see regarding claimed improved plant performance.  Plenty of anecdotal evidence too which isn't worth the screen it appears upon.

https://www.amazon.com/Root-Naturally-Azomite-Rock-Dust/dp/B0149L0EJ2/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1507809270&sr=8-18&keywords=mycorrhizae

Interesting that Mark's link has glowing reviews for Azomite.

Probably a waste of money for the soil where I live, but a couple years ago when I was in Nevada, I bought a big bag for $20.

I add it to my potting mixes.  Probably doesn't hurt. I agree it is over hyped.

gozp

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What is the problem with rock dusts/Azomite? I would think they would be very beneficial to a extremely biologically active soils. Wouldn't the root exudates, microbes and fungi help break down the minerals into plant soluble forms?

If your soil analysis suggests the need for the minerals they may provide, then go for it.  I don't see any value myself.  The analysis is Na, Cl, (who needs table salt), a little Mg and K and a lot of Ca.

I think it's another feel-good thing with folks who forked out money seeing what they expect to see regarding claimed improved plant performance.  Plenty of anecdotal evidence too which isn't worth the screen it appears upon.

https://www.amazon.com/Root-Naturally-Azomite-Rock-Dust/dp/B0149L0EJ2/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1507809270&sr=8-18&keywords=mycorrhizae





 Im after the minerals & trace elements not table salt. :)

Vernmented

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Good find! I never heard the sea water part of it before. I thought all of the trace minerals were from the ash blasting out from deep within the Earth. I used to the beach with net bags and fill them up with seaweed to mulch with. At first I would rinse it off but I think that the small amount of salt would be just fine. I use Redman's Real Salt from Utah. I'll just throw some Azomite on my food instead.  ;D I have heard of humans eating Azomite but I can't image much of it would absorb. I know Azomite is fed to animals.

What is the problem with rock dusts/Azomite? I would think they would be very beneficial to a extremely biologically active soils. Wouldn't the root exudates, microbes and fungi help break down the minerals into plant soluble forms?

If your soil analysis suggests the need for the minerals they may provide, then go for it.  I don't see any value myself.  The analysis is Na, Cl, (who needs table salt), a little Mg and K and a lot of Ca.

I think it's another feel-good thing with folks who forked out money seeing what they expect to see regarding claimed improved plant performance.  Plenty of anecdotal evidence too which isn't worth the screen it appears upon.

https://www.amazon.com/Root-Naturally-Azomite-Rock-Dust/dp/B0149L0EJ2/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1507809270&sr=8-18&keywords=mycorrhizae





 Im after the minerals & trace elements not table salt. :)
-Josh

gozp

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Good find! I never heard the sea water part of it before. I thought all of the trace minerals were from the ash blasting out from deep within the Earth. I used to the beach with net bags and fill them up with seaweed to mulch with. At first I would rinse it off but I think that the small amount of salt would be just fine. I use Redman's Real Salt from Utah. I'll just throw some Azomite on my food instead.  ;D I have heard of humans eating Azomite but I can't image much of it would absorb. I know Azomite is fed to animals.

What is the problem with rock dusts/Azomite? I would think they would be very beneficial to a extremely biologically active soils. Wouldn't the root exudates, microbes and fungi help break down the minerals into plant soluble forms?

If your soil analysis suggests the need for the minerals they may provide, then go for it.  I don't see any value myself.  The analysis is Na, Cl, (who needs table salt), a little Mg and K and a lot of Ca.

I think it's another feel-good thing with folks who forked out money seeing what they expect to see regarding claimed improved plant performance.  Plenty of anecdotal evidence too which isn't worth the screen it appears upon.

https://www.amazon.com/Root-Naturally-Azomite-Rock-Dust/dp/B0149L0EJ2/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1507809270&sr=8-18&keywords=mycorrhizae





 Im after the minerals & trace elements not table salt. :)

It wasn't my find. It was actually the link of Mark in Texas provided. I just had to read everything what was written there. :D

pineislander

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Good find! I never heard the sea water part of it before. I thought all of the trace minerals were from the ash blasting out from deep within the Earth. I used to the beach with net bags and fill them up with seaweed to mulch with. At first I would rinse it off but I think that the small amount of salt would be just fine. I use Redman's Real Salt from Utah. I'll just throw some Azomite on my food instead.  ;D I have heard of humans eating Azomite but I can't image much of it would absorb. I know Azomite is fed to animals.

I actually think that especially in coastal areas we already get plenty of salt from atmospheric deposition of salt from the sea. Most raindrops nucleate on marine salt particles, and marine salt makes up the largest source of atmospheric dry deposition on earth.

Mark in Texas

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I would trust him more on fungi too. He even wears fungi. His hat is made of this really flammable conk's fibers.

....and mushrooms will save the world, AND, And....save us from ourselves!   ;D  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-9zzXuZ2h4

Me thinks the Mycelium guru done got hold of the wrong shrooms.  8)

Speaking of mushrooms had our first locally grown Oyster mushrooms bought at a San Antonio Farmer's Market.  Damn good and not pricey either.

« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 09:14:33 AM by Mark in Texas »

Mark in Texas

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It wasn't my find. It was actually the link of Mark in Texas provided. I just had to read everything what was written there. :D

Most plants require all of the 13 essential elements - macros, secondaries and micros.  Where those elements come from isn't the issue as long as they're in the proper form the plant can uptake and process.  Salts aka chemicals.   Anything beyond that belongs in the group of Beneficial elements.  Silicon comes to mind.

Check out the incredible SUPER high tech, huge greenhouse ops the Dutch are doing.  They are kicking butt regarding production using hydroponics, salts, special LED lighting, robots.

Vernmented

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The more that I think about it volcanic ash mixed with ancient sea water sounds like an ideal amendment. Throw some sulfur pellets down as well to help with pH if you are going that route.
-Josh

Mark in Texas

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The more that I think about it volcanic ash mixed with ancient sea water sounds like an ideal amendment. Throw some sulfur pellets down as well to help with pH if you are going that route.

Don't forget a little bit of angel dust and eye of newt.   ;D

 

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