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Author Topic: Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants  (Read 1763 times)

Tominhaiti

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Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants
« on: June 03, 2014, 10:54:31 PM »
Myself and two other missionaries are interested in introducing new plants to Haiti. Two of us went to Costa Rica recently and brought back a lot of seed. Looking for some plants, preferably grafted, of rambutan, Mamey (red) and black sapote, jade vine (both colors), Fairchild canistel #2, Honey and Fwang tung carambola, grafted spanish lime, and others.

Two of us are looking mainly for fruits, with some flowers for our wives, while I am looking to not only bring in new fruits to help the local farmers, but also want to re-beautify our community of Verrettes, once called the "City of Flowers". Elevation from 200' up to 3,700'.

I can travel stateside and bring plants in.

Two plant varieties that two of us want for our yards are travelers palm and the old man beard palm.

Any help is of course greatly appreciated. Better yet, fill two suitcases of plants and I may consider paying your expenses to come and visit! (I have a short-term generous donor).

jcaldeira

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Re: Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2014, 11:26:53 PM »
Haiti Customs clearance can be a pain in the ass.  They charged used, donated, eye glasses $1/pair import duty.  Fruit in Haiti is also very prone to theft.  If you can't defend it, it will be gone.
Applying laws and rules equally to all is a cornerstone of a civilized society.

MassSpectrum

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Re: Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2014, 11:27:37 PM »
You might consider cactus fruit to endure the drought periods as I read you face similar HOT DRY periods as we do here in FL (helps motivate my fondness of them). In particular fruiting jungle cacti (that just love the water whens it comes). Also succulents such as Chaya Spinach Tree would be a dream there. These are just off the top of my head of course, but with these particular examples they're extremely easy to propagate, nearly year round, meaning they have the potential to be 'spread' much faster than just about anything, with rather short waits specimen to specimen to get actual yields.

From there, the bigger picture I see for their troubles includes trees with dense roots, or possibly more importantly trees with deep taproots. The fast growing kind. Not for food, but to stabilize the earth there. I'm not sure about their root systems, but some of the biggest trees in the world are in the Eucalyptus family and they can easily grow 10' a year, to reforest that landscape.

I don't normally go making lists of the latter there, but seems it'd be important work.

Don't think to far into ornamentals too often but do absorb them, none the less, while many the edible perennials I chase end up having ornamental value. Perhaps the coolest feature of my yard is my 7' tall giant Asiatic Spider Lily. The flowers are giant, but odd. Pretty neat but the plant itself is the lushest jungle foliage one might hope for. Real popular here as a landscaping feature, especially out in the mini earth islands in parking lots (without irrigation). Those dont often look too choice but the giant cluster in my yard under the shade tree is bigger than all the sites say it should be. The other awesome feature I've 'built' is my 'forest' of huge Sword Pear cactus. It's a real force of nature this lot, and it makes impressive night blooming flowers, real big but not giants like the dragon fruit genus. Shampoo Ginger is a nice looking ginger, the stands I collect from are about 8' in height by years end. They die back here in the winter, but the fall flowers that provide choice natural shampoo are worth consideration. I've been growing cassabanana vine here a few years this thing is always blooming when its warm out, very impressive but haven't figured out how to fruit it yet while I haven't started cloning it yet and dont have prime supply on seeds worth noting either. Outside of that lot, well, wrong forums.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2014, 02:32:48 AM by MassSpectrum »

gunnar429

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Re: Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2014, 09:09:30 AM »
I can vouch for the chaya....my yard is full of it, after buying one $10 plant from echo 2 yrs ago.  Grows fast and roots easily. 
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

Doglips

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Re: Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2014, 09:11:14 AM »
Haiti Customs clearance can be a pain in the ass.  They charged used, donated, eye glasses $1/pair import duty.  Fruit in Haiti is also very prone to theft.  If you can't defend it, it will be gone.
Bring bribes.

gunnar429

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Re: Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2014, 09:12:08 AM »
maybe try annona seeds from superior fruits.  They may be easier to get into the country and many grow true from seed.
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

Tropicdude

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Re: Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2014, 01:54:39 PM »
There are many sources for plants and seeds right on the Island in the Dominican Republic. 

I have no Idea what the restrictions at the border is, going into Haiti.   can't be much worse than flying in live plants.

The "Jardin Botanico" sells seeds for many trees, including Palms.

The Nursery called "Superplants" on the "Autopista Duarte" has some exotic varieties, fruits, palms etc. and if you have a 4X4 you can go to near Cotui, to Alfonso's place he sells seedlings of all kinds of exotic fruits, everything from Jaboticaba, Jackfruit, Grumichama, to Peach Palm etc. really cheap.   heck if you need company you could even meet up with me, and I will go with you. ( To Alfonsos place not Haiti :) )
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

MassSpectrum

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Re: Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2014, 03:21:31 AM »
What about banana's? While I'm not at all built to deliver cultivars or anything worth note, with the dry periods you experience there it seems exotic banana cultivars might be a real beam of focus in your quest to enrich your people. I dont gather there are very many Caribbean places much better than parts of Haiti for such, in terms of the unique geographical features there....

Quote
The small size of farms provides a low income to farmers as they are unable to apply fertilizers or minimize the risk of insect pests and diseases.

Low income returns to farmers are experienced when low prices are offered though shipping and marketing agents. As a result, farmers are unable to effectively increase their production. They are unable to apply fertilizers or to minimize risks caused by diseases. The industry is plagued with high costs and low prices. Bananas are also plentiful in Latin America and Africa, thus imposing a threat to the Caribbean's position on the British market.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana_production_in_the_Caribbean


Not good news, eh. But whats the problem here? I know all around this area, where we have bonafide ports (plural), are the largest phosphate mines on the continent. I might surmise that whatever this holdup might account for why there's no supply chain for ammonium nitrate also. Supposedly there's supposed to be some 'American' resolve to help out Haiti, but thats not what I'm seeing, unless Haiti justs aims to hurt itself....?
« Last Edit: June 05, 2014, 03:23:56 AM by MassSpectrum »

jcaldeira

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Re: Missionaries in Haiti looking for plants
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2014, 03:46:25 AM »
Haiti Customs clearance can be a pain in the ass.  They charged used, donated, eye glasses $1/pair import duty.  Fruit in Haiti is also very prone to theft.  If you can't defend it, it will be gone.
Bring bribes.

I recommend NOT bribing.  It only encourages lawlessness.  Think of the long game here.
Applying laws and rules equally to all is a cornerstone of a civilized society.

 

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