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Author Topic: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness  (Read 211 times)

GangstaRIB

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Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« on: January 10, 2018, 01:34:58 PM »
I have yet to find anything bad about this variety. I posted previously about the Texas-cado varieties but the consensus seems to be that they are highly over-rated. Living in Central FL we can get a good blast of upper 20s every winter with mid-20s typically likely on a yearly basis. low 20s I would say is a once in a decade occurrence. I have read ON might be able to take down to 17 degrees. I imagine at that temp it would freeze to the ground but atleast you would probably be able to get fruit after an entire year of recovering post freeze (for a well established tree of course)

So what is the experience with cold tolerance here on the board. As a likely Monroe x Mexican variety I would suspect it would be 22 degrees (as a monroe) at the very least.

Monroe seems to be a very vigorous tree whereas mexican varieties seem to be a bit more weeping. Is the ON something I could keep around 10-12 feet tall with yearly pruning? (or even 2-3 times a year) I know some very vigorous cados you can cut back to 8 ft and they will send a shoot to 20 ft in the course of a few months. Is this something the ON will do? I imagine most FL cados exibit this behavior.

I did a search for ON and didnt see much on these two particular questions. I have yet to try an ON but it sure looks delicious. FL (WI) size with M creaminess color.

I've tried WI store bought and I am not very happy with them. I find hass to be pretty good so somewhere in between would likely fit my needs. I just can't afford to have a 30 ft high tree in my backyard that I can't keep under control.

skhan

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2018, 04:20:38 PM »
I can't comment about cold tolerance but it seems pretty vigorous to me.

Here it is 2016 a little after I planted it.
Maybe around 1.5ft


A year after:
Maybe 3-3.5ft


I'm going to update my yard post later this month but now its more than double this size.
I'd expect next year if it doesn't hold fruit it would be around 15ft

GangstaRIB

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2018, 04:38:34 PM »
Thank you. She does look pretty healthy nice work so far.

WGphil

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2018, 08:08:57 PM »
I planted a Brogdon as it could handle the cold but it taste a little eggy at times.

This past season they were wonderful and creamy due to heavy rain

Just planted a Lula and Wurtz and a Day is coming.

Oro's aren't as cold hardy

GangstaRIB

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2018, 09:28:51 PM »
Youre about a stone's throw away from me in winter garden. So you are not a huge fan of the Brogdon? A day has been suggested and I do worry about tree size. Wurtz  I have thought about but I worry about the mid 20s we get from time to time here.

BohicaBob

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2018, 10:33:20 PM »
I have had success with cold-hardy and super-cold-hardy avocados in my yard over the past few years.  The cold-hardy ones I have include Mexicola, Brogdon, Day, Bacon, and Winter Mexican.  The three Day trees and the Winter Mexican I grafted myself.  The Day trees are some of the fastest growing trees I have ever planted.  Thankfully the Days have slowed down in growth otherwise I'd have to prune them.  Two of the three Days suffered slight leaf burn from last week's freezes but their emerging blossoms are fine.  The third Day in located closer to the lake I live on and is frost-protected a bit by a Live Oak tree and a Southerm Maple tree overhead.  I have two Mexicolas out in the open on the north (and coldest) part of my property - no cold damage whatsover to the leaves and emerging blossoms.  The Brodgon is young (though I had a 25' Brogdon in the 1990's) and the Bacon (with blossoms) were both unaffected by this latest cold snap as well.  The super-cold-hardy species I have were unaffected as well and these are also located on the north side of my yard: Joey (another graft of mine), Brazos Belle, and Fantastic. 

Several winters ago, I had a major freeze (<23 degrees F) which destroyed the flowers on the cold-hardy varieties but the super-cold-hardy species were unaffected including their flowers amazingly.

WGphil

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 01:11:37 PM »
My brogdon is a big one and I supply several neighbors  with fruit

Makes great guacamole and this year they were wonderful but wanted to add to the season so new types were planted a couple months back.  I do like them turning color so you know which one is ripe and they are bigger than some other cold choices that I am familiar with

I haven't had any mid twenties in a very long time, knock on wood. But with those temps a brogdon is a pretty good choice



Wurtz is smaller and easier to cold protect if needed or planted closer to a building with its smaller size

Lots of choices out there, good luck

Bob of all your choices which one is the best tasting or your fave?





« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 01:18:52 PM by WGphil »

GangstaRIB

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 02:49:41 PM »
How big is your brogdon? It's been my first choice especially since it was 'born' in our backyard (winter haven is about 30-45 mins south of here both both of us) but I'm wondering if I can keep it from turning into a monster. Picture would be great even. So you are very happy with the fruit it sounds like? Also I keep reading that B types seem to be self fruitful in our area assuming they flower in our 'winter' time.

WGphil

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2018, 10:33:28 AM »
About 35 feet mostly up.

If it has a problem it sets too many fruit to the point of whole limbs shearing off due to load. No pollinators

It's still beat up from Irma but pic taken today





GangstaRIB

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2018, 10:50:56 AM »
wow shes a beast. How do you pick the fruit?

BohicaBob

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Re: Oro Negro Vigor and cold hardiness
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2018, 01:13:46 PM »
WGphil: I like Day (I have 3 Day trees  :) ), Brogdon (had 4 in the 1990s, back to a newly-planted one now), Fantastic, Brazos Belle, and Mexicola.  I'm not a fan of Bacon and maybe I'll top-graft that tree.  I have eaten but one Joey last year, so I'll have to see this year, but you could ask the squirrels about the Joey fruit they ate last year before I could stop them.  :-\  I created a Winter Mexican graft a few years ago that is coming along slowly.  I've never eaten a Winter Mexican but I know of a person who has lots of them so I'll be sure to try one this year.

I'm trying to get some budwood from a seedling avocado tree in my cousin's back hard in Waipahu, HI.  The fruit is out of this world tasty and HUGE and shaped like a long gourd.  Some of the fruit weigh around 5#.



 

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