Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Cookie Monster

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 160
1
Small scions and depends on the cultivar. Monoembryonic seedlings are generally sufficiently thick. For polyembryonic seedlings (which are thinner), there is a technique where one tips the scion donor tree before planting the seed to produce thin shoots. I think the trick is to tip just after a flush point / node (vs below it), which produces a large amount of thin shoots.

When I've grafted recently sprouted seedlings like this, I've always favored monoembryonic seedlings. I know nurseries like turpentine (which is polyembryonic), but I've had excellent success with monoembryonic seedlings, such as glenn.

Mango seedling can be grafted 3 weeks after sprouting (while still tender and "red stage") with high rate of success. The seed generally has a store of energy for 2 flushes, so if you can graft on the first flush, there is still enough energy to push the scion to a full flush. That flush is then used to provide energy to the tree.

Just wondering about how low it takes for Turpentine seeds to grow to 3 gallon grafting size?

Single bud or small scions?  It seems like the seedli gs are really small to be grafting to at that point no?  Need steady hands?

2
We have an Asian (Vietnamese?) lady that will come each year and ask to buy the entire crop of NDMs.

3
Bummer. 3.5 miles inland is pretty close to shore. I'm a full 10+ miles inland -- although I'm in a very urban setting which means less foliage and therefore less humidity (via evapotranspiration). Surprised you're having issues.

Thanks, Jeff. I am very much hoping that one way or another LZ will be available from my favorite purveyors.
My non-spray program was due to a lack of motivation. My diabetes got a lot worse, and these days I have to limit myself to about a tablespoon of mango per day.  :(
If I have more energy next year I'll get back on board.

I'm about 3 1/2 miles inland, backing up to a canal.
Some of my other cultivars look fine (so far). Too early to know how they will ripen.

4
Just got it. I don't normally check that email addy. Best is to use the messaging feature here on the forum.

5
Yes, I actually have 2 clonal seedlings which have both been in production for a few years. I haven't noted any variation between the two nor between mine and Walter's tree. I selected those two from a group of several dozen seeds, based on my knowledge of the tree on Walter's property -- leaf shape, growth habit, and sap smell.

I think LZ is the superior selection, but I do have a "collect them all" approach to anything in that flavor line.

It's generally a top-tier mango, like PPK, LZ, Sweet Tart, OE, etc. But, I slightly prefer LZ over OS.

OS does get jelly seed, and it's been rather prone to powdery mildew infection. Mine has also had a tendency to grow more than fruit -- not sure if this is just an issue with my tree or whether that's common to the cultivar.

1.  Is it better than Orange Essense, PPK & LZ aka the GOAT according to some fans.

2.  Are they likely to have any other common problems?  i.e - low yield, disease, uneven ripening, jelly seed, etc.

Cookie Monster, yours OS is a seedling of OS correct? wondering if there are any variation/disease resistance, usually seedlings are better in disease resistance terms.

6
Mango seedling can be grafted 3 weeks after sprouting (while still tender and "red stage") with high rate of success. The seed generally has a store of energy for 2 flushes, so if you can graft on the first flush, there is still enough energy to push the scion to a full flush. That flush is then used to provide energy to the tree.

Just wondering about how low it takes for Turpentine seeds to grow to 3 gallon grafting size?

7
It's generally a top-tier mango, like PPK, LZ, Sweet Tart, OE, etc. But, I slightly prefer LZ over OS.

OS does get jelly seed, and it's been rather prone to powdery mildew infection. Mine has also had a tendency to grow more than fruit -- not sure if this is just an issue with my tree or whether that's common to the cultivar.

1.  Is it better than Orange Essense, PPK & LZ aka the GOAT according to some fans.

2.  Are they likely to have any other common problems?  i.e - low yield, disease, uneven ripening, jelly seed, etc.

8
You must be a ways inland. While I've seen MBBS on LZ, it's generally an isolated fruit here and there, which has been an issue on a number of other trees in my orchard.

If one is unwilling to spray fungicide (and especially those living inland or in a rural setting, where humidity is higher), then only a handful of cultivars will produce well in those circumstances.

PS: You guys need to try eating your NDMs slightly under-ripe -- before they fully develop the yellow coloration. Definitely not boring when eaten in this state. Splitting is an issue with the NDM #4 clone, which unfortunately is the one being sold by most nurseries today -- probably because the previously popular clone took a long time to begin bearing. #4 also can refuse to grow sometimes.

Lemon Zest is seriously susceptible to bacterial rot, or whatever it's called. I'm guessing this problem will spread to your area at some point. Perhaps an effective treatment for this will be found? Hard to speculate. At the moment it doesn't look like I'll get more than a couple of edible fruits from my tree. (It should be noted that I sprayed no copper or fungicides on any of my trees this year.)

NDM is kind of boring, as previously noted. And it splits.  Rosigold tastes best if it ripens in July rather than March.

I have been unable to keep Venus alive. Your mileage may vary. 

My Spirit of '76 had a large crop of excellent mangos last year. This year it is again loaded with beautiful fruit. I don't know yet how they will ripen. I am hoping that it is more disease-resistant than, for example, Kent.

9
I'd probably pull spirit of 76 and Rosigold... at least that's what I did at my place :D

10
From what I've seen, OS is probably more vigorous than LZ (and LZ seems to be more vigorous than PPK).

Whats the growth rate of OS? Similar to PPK and LZ?

11
I was thinking lemon zest  as well.

12
Yep, that's the one. It seems to be a recent introduction, as I first started seeing that about 3 years ago. Wish someone here could identify the beetle and provide some background on it.

13
In socal, you guys have a good amount of chill hours, which would translate to better flowering on lychee, longan, and mango among others.

14
Alex is a smart cookie, but my suggestion would be to take any planting recommendations with a grain of salt. There are numerous keitt trees in my bario that pump out prodigious quantities of clean fruit. One of my keitt trees did have an issue with MBBS, but a hard pruning seems to have rectified the problem. And, oddly, the older keitt just a couple dozen feet away never got it.

It's pretty typical to see overreactions to the predicted / perceived scope and severity of a disease outbreak in the early stages. I'm personally not letting MBBS susceptibility guide any of my planting decisions until I've had enough time to fully evaluate the impact to my particular growing conditions. I would suggest you do the same.

For a late season mango, I personally prefer Keitt over Kent. Keitt has a later season, and the fruit is far less susceptible to internal breakdown than that of the Kent.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« on: June 18, 2018, 04:36:26 PM »
Patience is key!

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Goodbye Pina Colada Mango Tree
« on: June 18, 2018, 11:27:47 AM »
My tree looks like zands' -- ie, it's loaded with fruit.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Bacterial spot on rosigold mangoes
« on: June 17, 2018, 10:49:26 AM »
OK. That does not look like MBBS. Probably just a split due to the rain that got infected.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado tree getting too much water??
« on: June 15, 2018, 09:20:49 PM »
Why woodchips vs sand for mounding?

This is how I plant mine and my yard doesn't even flood. They really like heavy mulch.




19
Interesting info. Thanks.

A few weeks ago the Florida Dept of Ag inspector told me they believed the mite is restricted to the north end of Pine Island, called Bokeelia. This Wednesday the FL. Dept of Ag stopped by my neighbor's Lychee grove and gave notice that all Bokeelia Lychee is under quarantine. I spoke to the inspector who was getting compliance agreements signed.
Movement of plant material off farms is prohibited, fruit can be shipped out of state or into Lee County only, but leaves and stems must be removed. The Erinose Mite creates a shelter which makes it resistant to any pesticide, so affected trees must be pruned of all affected growth which means heavy pruning. FLDept.of AG is seeking a contractor to provide major pruning of all existing trees, which should be followed up by spraying as regrowth occurs. This needs to be done as thoroughly and as close to simultaneously as possible across the affected area to prevent reinfection from untreated trees. That is the most up-to-date information I have.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sweet tart mango
« on: June 15, 2018, 10:59:46 AM »
It's typical for older leaves to yellow and fall off.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado leaves full of holes
« on: June 15, 2018, 10:58:33 AM »
I've been seeing this a lot lately. When I inspect at night, the culprit is a very small brown beetle. I have no idea what the beetle is.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lone lychee
« on: June 14, 2018, 10:37:51 PM »
Lychee fruit lose some flavor if allowed to hang too long on the tree. And, the mauritius I've had so far this year were a little watered down.

However, my SweetHeart -- which gave me a grand total of 4 fruits this year -- were ridiculously delicious, just like in years past. This is the 3rd year in a row that it's borne fruit, on a tree planted in 2011 if memory serves. This year's crop would have been a lot better if hurricane Irma hadn't torn it apart. It's never given me more than a few pounds of fruit though.

If memory serves, your tree is also a SweetHeart. It's a bit odd that it hasn't fruited yet, as it had already fruited for me in the pot before it made its way to your yard, and your tree is older than mine which has borne thrice to date. It seems like there is some environmental situation that it's not fond of.

At any rate, the SweetHeart should be blissfully sweet with a hint of tart and a floral note that rounds out what is an exquisitely delicious fruit. When it starts bearing, you will understand why you waited so long.

PS -- that tree should be somewhere around 14 years old by now. It originally came from ECHO as a nice 7 gallon in 2006.

23
Highly doubt they are cutting lychees down.

I did get a call from the ag dept asking if I had spotted this pest in our orchard.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Bacterial spot on rosigold mangoes
« on: June 14, 2018, 11:33:25 AM »
Alex, the middle fruit in the middle picture does have a fissure that looks more characteristic of MBBS.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: First Nam doc Mai Mango 2018
« on: June 14, 2018, 11:25:35 AM »
In general, the trick to adding flavor complexity (ie, acidity) to a climacteric fruit is to pick it mature green and ripen indoors. This holds true even for jackfruit -- which if left to ripen on the tree retain zero acidity and are a little bland for my taste. But, it does take some trial and error, as one needs to be able to judge when the fruit is ready to be picked.

Most novices (including myself when I was new at this) believe that best flavor and sugar development is obtained when mangoes are allowed to ripen on tree. This is not true. Moreover, if fruit is prone to internal break down (ie, jelly seed), picking early mitigates the issue.

The fruit in the picture probably would have been good 2 - 3 days prior to when the picture was taken. I typically eat mine when the skin is totally green still. It takes some experimentation / trial and error to find the right stage. But once you find it, NDM is a top tier mango.

When allowed to fully ripen, NDM has a bit of a "nutty" flavor, which can be a bit offputting to the typical North American consumer.

I've already harvested about 1/2 of my NDM tree. Cutting the fruit a little early causes it to retain acidity.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 160
Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers