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Messages - Cookie Monster

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1
Cookie Monster getting excited!

I moved to FL from socal 13+ years ago -- with literally miles of haas avocado groves within walking distance from my house (right next to the Calavo packing house). Still have not adapted to the horrible west indian avocadoes that are grown here. Over the years, I've found a couple that I can down without retching (usually the ones with giant seeds and thin flesh -- which seems to concentrate the flavor a little).

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: green sapote root stalk
« on: October 19, 2018, 09:06:19 PM »
I remember someone experimenting with this many years ago. Seems like they would take, but there was a big differential in thickness (green sap thicker than canistel) that persisted for many years.

Mamey sapote is a better root stock. Buy a few fruits from the store, sew the seeds and then graft.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Carambola deficiency I.D.
« on: October 19, 2018, 09:03:51 PM »
I give my kari about 150 - 200 pounds of gypsum a year, but it's a large tree, over 10 years old. Gypsum is inexpensive if you get it from a fertilizer supplier. I get mine for $12 / 50 pound bag... actually just got 1/2 ton delivered the other day to prep for mango season. Brix on mine went from 8's to 12 to 14 with gypsum.

Your young tree probably only needs a few pounds.

4
haha! I did that once many years ago when shield budding a julie mango. The tree is still alive and well, it just has a weird U shape at the graft point.

5
I'm so jealous! You want to sell / trade budsticks? I have the Florida Hass, which is excellent, but doesn't turn black like that.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Carambola deficiency I.D.
« on: October 18, 2018, 01:59:19 PM »
If you start seeing chlorosis, hit it with some sulfur and a good micronutrient mix.

Carambola can be a bit insipid. The propagated cultivars are generally only astringent if picked too green.

You can increase the brix some by adding calcium, if that's a lacking nutrient. The amount of calcium required for best sugar development is a lot higher than most would assume.

7
I'll give ward labs a shot.

Curious to see the updated soil test from cbss.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Carambola deficiency I.D.
« on: October 18, 2018, 09:38:53 AM »
Looks like normal healthy carambola. Congrats.

9
Don't prune now. Blooming can start in late Oct / early Nov.

10
Orkine -- looks fine to me.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit identification
« on: October 10, 2018, 09:41:20 PM »
You sure it's not citrus?

12
Venus might be one to add to the list of late seasoners. I had fruit into October on mine.

haha! It's probably true. I probably go through 500 pounds worth in a typical mango season. Literally put in 10 pounds during the 3 month mango season.

“ In addition, the U.S. per capita consumer consumption of mango fruit has increased from 1.2 pounds per person in 1996 to 4.8 pounds in 2013, according to the National Mango Board.”

So forum members’ consumption skews the population average.


Spread the word, Mango season in South Florida typically goes from Early March to October if you have enough mango variety. Here's a UF blog mentioning some early & late choices common to S. Fl.    http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/palmbeachco/2018/08/23/mangoes-are-still-in-season/

I still have quite a few mangos available for picking & hope you do toooo...  :P

It is quite easy for one to have tree picked mangos for just over half the year in S. Fl. by planting several varieties.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Help identifying the worms (?)
« on: October 05, 2018, 10:11:12 AM »
Yah, they don't like dry weather. So, I guess they probably wouldn't survive in socal anyway :D.

It appears they didn’t make it, problem solved :) I left them in the bottom of the cut box outside, and the dry weather was probably too much for them.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Help identifying the worms (?)
« on: October 04, 2018, 09:54:55 PM »
Pretty sure those yellow banded ones were introduced to florida. They are a little more aggressive than the red ones (which I think are native), making their way into homes.

A quick dip in Sevin will obliterate them.

They are beneficials, but may not want to introduce to Ca.

https://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Yellow-bandedMillipede.pdf

15
I"m skeptical they can beat Gary Zill :-)

Cookie Monster is a Gator :D

It seems like a highly scientific approach.  I guess we'll see if they come up with any varieties that are better than the new Zill creations.  Go Gators!  (UF is now #8 public university in America--USNews ranking.)

16
haha! It's probably true. I probably go through 500 pounds worth in a typical mango season. Literally put in 10 pounds during the 3 month mango season.

“ In addition, the U.S. per capita consumer consumption of mango fruit has increased from 1.2 pounds per person in 1996 to 4.8 pounds in 2013, according to the National Mango Board.”

So forum members’ consumption skews the population average.

17
Yes.

:D Same experience here. Except mine was from budwood that came from the mother tree. Someone must be color blind.

Was that from the budwood I brought you a few years ago?

18
:D Same experience here. Except mine was from budwood that came from the mother tree. Someone must be color blind.

19
I just use granulated fertilizer.. A couple of my trees have deficiencies, but the rest are doing well.

20
I definitely did not follow the instructions. It was an experiment of sorts, and I grossly miscalculated the amount of free calcium carbonate. Surprisingly, most of the trees survived. I did lose several anonas, and my magana sapote looked like it was on the brink of death for a while -- but no more than 10 - 15% tree loss. At any rate, it was a cool experiment :D.

Works extremely well. I've never monitored its use in potted culture, but I was able to (accidentally) lower the pH to about 1/4 acre of my orchard to the low 3's with a couple thousand pounds of Tiger 90. The effect is temporary though. Three years later, the pH was back to the 7's.

Note that it also takes several months for the pH to drop.

 Jeff was that following the directions? Thats an extreme drop and certainly hope it doesn't drop that low in my pots. What plants/trees could even survive in a PH that low?

21
The rise was gradual, with the majority of the rise happening after I installed irrigation (which comes from high pH canal water).

Works extremely well. I've never monitored its use in potted culture, but I was able to (accidentally) lower the pH to about 1/4 acre of my orchard to the low 3's with a couple thousand pounds of Tiger 90. The effect is temporary though. Three years later, the pH was back to the 7's.

Note that it also takes several months for the pH to drop.
3 years doesn't seem very temporary. Or did the pH rise gradually through those 3 years? Did you keep track?

22
Has it fruited yet?

23
Works extremely well. I've never monitored its use in potted culture, but I was able to (accidentally) lower the pH to about 1/4 acre of my orchard to the low 3's with a couple thousand pounds of Tiger 90. The effect is temporary though. Three years later, the pH was back to the 7's.

Note that it also takes several months for the pH to drop.

24
Ca has carib fly now?

25
Interesting. Lived in socal for 30 years, never thought coconut would be possible.

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