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Messages - laidbackdood

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1
I have tried many oils to treat leafminer.......its a real problem where i live........the neem oil is very good as it soaks into the leaf and actually kills the grub........all the others just provide a coating on the leaf.....therefore making it difficult to get in...........i was told by my citrus man to combine the two for better effect and its the best i have found so far......the eco oil or pest oil on its own did nothing to deter them..........this mix of the two i have found to be 95% effective....still some but not much..........i have mixed in a little fish/seaweed fert with the above before and that has had good results but i will do the urea on its own then........thanks for that. ;).....with the urea drying.........i saw white powder stuff around the fruits at the base of quite a few fruits on a couple of trees....thats the dried urea is it?

2
Dear Millet.......I am going to spray my trees for citrus leafminer with neem oil mixed with another oil(eco oil).........Would it be good to apply a small amount of urea with this mix as well.....was thinking the oil would help to seal the urea underneath its coating.........good idea or silly Millet?

3
update.....i sprayed my trees one month before spring bud break and they all flowered prolifically..........some of them are covered in tiny little fruits and flowering has finished.......i sprayed again and went away for two days......all the little fruits doubled in size over those two days(early fruit drop).....leaves have gone darker green on a lot of trees as well...........so when do i do the final spray of urea then millet please?
Summer has just started here now.(Dec 1st).......it was 40C today..... Evil hot.

4
nice one z willis ;)

5
I used this method on all my citrus trees ...some in ground and some pots plus my friends 9 trees in ground.........they all responded with loads of blooms.....nice one millet.......i have been foliar feeding with a seaweed and fish emulsion blend since and this is well liked by the trees too.
     The guy i buy my trees gave me a really useful tip as well........he said never to feed at soil or foliar feed when any plant is starting to flower or in flower as it disrupts the growth cycle..........That explains why all my eureka lemons dropped last year at flower stage......very good tip......
Now i just wait for the flowering to finish before i feed at all....even my strawbs.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: All My In Ground Trees Are 2 Months Early
« on: November 29, 2018, 09:38:56 AM »
I have a lemonade tree here in Perth......semi dwarf.
I have been foliar feeding every two weeks with something called eco vital.....its basically a blend of seaweed and fish emulsion(after flowering).......ive been getting really good results with that......i let my lemonade go yellow like a normal lemon and then squeeze the juice and make lemonade out of it......very nice.....i also made ice blocks out of the juice for later on.....i tend to thin out my flowers on all my trees.
          I have also found that out of all my different ferts i have tried with citrus........citrus responds best to urea for its nitrogen source....they just go for it with half strength liquid feed with urea at its source for nitrogen........just something i am finding.

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Leaf curling
« on: November 12, 2018, 02:12:38 AM »
think its balanced between n and p millet.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Carrie mango tree help! SOS
« on: November 11, 2018, 01:35:27 AM »
They hate the cold......I have several.....they all go crinkly brown in the winter.(antherose /spelt like that)......they dont like wet feet in the slightest and you are best not to feed with chemical ferts.....organic is best for them........fish and seaweed liquid is good and foliar feed too.........in winter keep them on the dry side and out of cold winds........they love the summer heat............good pruning helps....
there is a vid on you tube giving advice on pruning "How to prune a mango".......search for that and you will see a pic of a african guy with glasses i think.........they are an orchard in tanzania or similar....about 10 mins long..........watch that.....it takes a while to get interesting but it shows you how to prune and train a mango for max yield.......i have been following this method with all my trees.......I will see if i can find it....very cool vid and system !

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zh1AnvNa6mc

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: strawberries and blueberries
« on: November 11, 2018, 01:28:33 AM »
thanks for replies.......nice plant there......i have since read thinning the blueberries will in crease their size........its the first year.......so maybe next year i will thin a bit and the tree will be more established.........strawbs i find are fussy.,,,i know you are not supposed to water the leaves.

10
Citrus General Discussion / Leaf curling
« on: November 11, 2018, 01:20:02 AM »
Any idea why my leaves are curling like this please?.....i suspect potassium deficiency?   Thanks.








11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / strawberries and blueberries
« on: November 09, 2018, 09:10:59 AM »
How to i get my strawbs and blueberries to grow big berries please?......just not happening for me .....its bloody hot now in perth 33C.....i have been using seaweed and fish but i wonder if there is anything to help boost the fruit size....i could thin the blueberries out a bit but the strawbs are proving more difficult....any ideas please?

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Growing avocado in sandy soil
« on: November 09, 2018, 08:59:59 AM »
well i grow both citrus and avo's here in Perth.......I know a guy who grafts and sells avo's........we get temps to 40C plus in the summer......I went to his house......he had a tree planted in pure sand........it looked like it was on the beach !.......around that he had a circle of compost out about 3 or 4 inches from the trunk........with citrus there are no feeder roots within a 6 inch circle of the trunk....I used to put food in that area and it killed my trees....loads of them.....avo's need good drainage and hate wet feet...........sand provides the perfect drainage for winter.......so the roots dont stay wet......even if it rains hard....my papaya has gone through winter nicely because i just stuck it in pure sand.......nothing added to the planting hole at planting time.......then compost out 6 inch from trunk with slow release fert.........I have two avo's in grow bags...they are difficult in pots or bags ........both citrus and avos......do well in ground but you need to adjust to the seasons........in winter......you remove all mulch and let any sun that comes help dry out the soil.......if the rootball is surrounded by sand that will happen............when it  gets hot.........compost with slow release around to the drip line and then a thick coat of mulch.......lupin or licerne is good......i did that today to 6 trees because we were 33C today ...36C tomorrow.........the avo's need their surface roots kept moist.....so water often and stick a thick layer of mulch on your pot.......i wouldnt go with compost because it will clog up the air spaces in your potting mix and you will get root rot........move them so they only get morning sun.......thats what i have done to mine....i am getting drooping leaves as well....water often to wet those surface roots but you dont need to water deeply........in ground you have create raised beds with leaf litter etc....thats very free draining..........since i have been putting plants in the ground ...straight into sand with no added stuff .....then do compost and feed when i see new growth and also food around the outside of the pot and not above the rootball.......things have improved dramatically.........the analogy i would use.....is to tease the roots....like the smell of kfc from a distance.......let the roots smell water and food over there and go looking for it....dont just give it to them.......then they will send out roots and develop bigger root systems......bigger and healthier roots = good top growth...Young trees are most at risk until they establish their root systems........citrus grow in peoples back yards here and nobody bothers with them,,,,,i ate some mandarins from a rental here a few years ago and they were yummy.....a big tree in pure sand and from nov to feb its evil hot with very very little rain but because they are so bloody big the roots have spread every where.....thery never get fed or water in this time !....i saw a huge lemon tree in a concrete pot on the side of the road.........nobody ever bothered with that.....it produced lemons !.........its all about establishment my friend...hope this helps.

13
Citrus General Discussion / Re: symptoms of lack of sun exposure
« on: October 22, 2018, 01:01:43 PM »
Dont under estimate roots staying wet.......damage occurs after 24 hours of remaining saturated.......the roots are happy when they have air around them......then they are active and the top flourishes......Ive killed so many trees when wet roots get mad with you.......dont let multiple days in a row of rain pour down on your pots....they must dry out to some degree in between waterings for the roots to thrive....if they stay wet and then the top gets cooked by strong sunlight.......Your in the poo.

14
Citrus General Discussion / Re: symptoms of lack of sun exposure
« on: October 22, 2018, 12:56:51 PM »
I have two large citrus trees in pots in my courtyard....one is an imperial mandarin and the other is a honey murcott mandarin.........i have heaps of other trees around the side of my house which get plenty of sun..........i have fed them all identically.,......the imperial gets some early morning sun  and the honey murcott gets some dappled light through the clear plastic roofing.............the honey murcott is one of my healthiest looking trees ...yet gets some of the least amount of light.....it was just covered in blooms.........all those blooms have now changed to little fruits .....the whole tree is covered in fruitlets and there is no sign of any fruit drop at all.........I do keep it on the dry side and its in a terracotta pot......
the ones down the side of the house have flowered and fruited but have had fruit drop.....dropped leaves and had some twig die back..........they also seem to take longer to dry out...even though they get sun and most are in terracotta.......temps are 20 to 26C here in spring....
               My trees in the ground that get heaps of sun....look healthy...have been fed properly but have shed a lot of the fruits and not many fruits are growing on any of them........my ones undercover a bit are doing better...even my feijoa is covered in blooms and receives only early morning sun......Go figure.

15
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Nitrogen deficiency?
« on: September 24, 2018, 10:03:48 AM »
Can be a Nitrogen deficiency because of root damage by overwatering.
yep......too wet and cold can make it go like that too........in spring they will drop just after new growth starts.....im getting some leaves like that now....dropping and we had a cold winter this year....def wasnt too wet mind and lemons tend to do that  a lot.
regardless you should remove the sucker from below the graft as that is the rootstock.

16
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Foliar spray
« on: September 23, 2018, 11:53:02 PM »
Hello all!

Winter is rolling around here in Canada (6 inches of snow where I live) and I am trying to give my 3 plants the best chance to thrive/survive the winter. I have 1 Eureka lemon, 1 navel orange and 1 key lime. I fertilize them once a month with a 30-10-10 water soluble fertilizer with minerals. . I understand that citrus are heavy nitrogen feeders. Can I use my same 30-10-10 fertilizer as a foliar spray to try and give the plants some extra nitrogen to help keep them thriving over the winter? Or should I go with something else?

Thanks!
seaweed is excellent as foliar feed....supplies trace elements as well.......but if their is no growth going on.......i wouldnt get too carried away........the biggest concern is keeping them on the dry side of moist.....because temps are lower they transpire far less......if they get plenty of rain....they stay too wet and the roots will rot........you didnt mention if they are inground or in pots........we have just come out of winter and i kept my trees under the eaves and away from the heavy rain.......collected rain water and i decided when they should have water.....not the climate.......wet feet is the biggest killer of citrus.....so watch for that....when spring comes.........give them an all mighty flush to get rid of salts ....apply your slow release ferts and then kick them into life with a liquid feed of fish/seaweed......the slow release might take a little while to kick in....so the liquid feed gives them stuff right now........Do this when you see the bud break.....its spring in perth west aussie now and all my trees are going nuts........most important time.....to do the right thing for your trees.........like millet said......one month before the spring burst....foliar feed with something high in urea but not a high does.......I did this to all my trees and my friends and all of them are covered in blooms......winter is a boring time except for some citrus like meyer lemon/lemonade that fruit all year round and grow anytime....most citrus take a nap during winter....If there is growth going on in winter....then i would feed but half strength    and good idea bringing them in out of the cold.........when you put back out in spring......gradually acclimatize them back with the sun ......so there is no shock....same with taking them in.....maybe just go in at night to start.  .Good luck.

17
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Keeping Kumquats?
« on: September 23, 2018, 06:09:44 PM »
wow ...so cool...all these varieties......i think the best we get in western australlia is the nagami....dont recognize any of these other ones......but id like to grow the best tasting and sweetest i can....i have a couple of calamondins and they are good for marmalade...not eaten whole and they are not a kumquat anyway....i think.....i will have a sniff around but nagami is quite common here....they might have the meiwa one here...i will have a sniff.

18
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Container Citrus & Rain Water
« on: September 23, 2018, 06:02:33 PM »
i bought some calcium nitrate in nz once from garden suppliers....they asked me a whole load of questions before they sold me my 20kg bag........apparently they use it to make bombs ! ....its volatile.

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Container Citrus & Rain Water
« on: September 23, 2018, 05:42:30 PM »
Dolomite lime is better than standard lime as it provides a nice blend of calcium to magnesium..........in spring and summer it gets added to my ferts for both inground and containers........ground egg shells provide slow release calcium as well.
millet.......if there are no  minerals in rainwater.....why do plants respond so well to it?....my understanding was rainwater is organic and contains organic particles.....if that is the case.....it would contain nutrients.........everything always looks really green after a good downpour......tap water contains lots of chemicals and to me just keeps cells turgid...........the lawns always look really green after a good downpour......they never look like that from irrigation from reticulation.....generations of gardeners swear by rain water......so something is going on there my friend.
if there are non of the nutrients you say.....then why do plants always respond more favorably to water from the sky than from a tap? ..this answer will be gold !

20
The damages are worse than what any sunburn could do.
I have a friend here in Perth...a few of his trees show similar carnage......we get 40C here in summer.
Once it starts it opens the door.

21
Probably sunburn......that looks like a bad case of it.....painting trunk with water based exterior white paint can help........there is no foliage there to help cover up the trunk.
Go and stand by the tree when the sun is up and you will probably see that ..that side of the tree gets all the sun.......a shade cloth could help as well.....paint it and let time heal.....that is why the other side of the tree is happy !

22
Citrus General Discussion / Spraying trees with urea
« on: September 07, 2018, 07:04:26 PM »
I read a post from Millet that suggested spraying your trees with urea a month before spring burst........so i sprayed my mates trees and sprayed all my trees with a fert high in ureas @ the beginning of August........All but one of our trees are covered in blooms........So thanks for the tip Millet......now to spray again when fruits are the size of a pea.

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: How to prevent ants going up your trees
« on: September 02, 2018, 01:52:50 PM »
There is a guy in eastern australia who paints the whole trunk white on potted citrus to protect them from sunburn.....just water based exterior white.....looks funny though.....they stay sticky for ages but it does go a bit ugly(dark after a while) but it does the job.......we get small ants and bull ants as well.....they bloody hurt.....but my mate gets infested with the ants....they live in the rootball and are all over his trees.....but leafminer are the biggest prob over here........but i have managed to get very fast new growth on a few of my trees.....that close up of the new growth(other post of my trees) went from bud to full leaf in about 3 weeks !....leaves are clean and nearly full size with no sign of leafminer yet because its still cold....6C at night and 19C days but things will warm up soon and when they do......the miner will come out.....so i will be spraying very soon with neem oil.

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Citrus General Discussion / Re: How to prevent ants going up your trees
« on: September 02, 2018, 01:49:04 PM »
There is a guy in eastern australia who paints the whole trunk white on potted citrus to protect them from sunburn.....just water based exterior white.....looks funny though.....they stay sticky for ages but it does go a bit ugly(dark after a while) but it does the job.......we get small ants and bull ants as well.....they bloody hurt.....but my mate gets infested with the ants....they live in the rootball and are all over his trees.

25
Brian, for new grafters I think you will have good success with cleft grafting,  Just make sure the stock and scion are about the same size is with.
Thats what i will be doing....the cleavage one ! hahaha

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