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Messages - Cookie Monster

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1
Don't prune now. Blooming can start in late Oct / early Nov.

2
Orkine -- looks fine to me.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit identification
« on: October 10, 2018, 09:41:20 PM »
You sure it's not citrus?

4
Venus might be one to add to the list of late seasoners. I had fruit into October on mine.

haha! It's probably true. I probably go through 500 pounds worth in a typical mango season. Literally put in 10 pounds during the 3 month mango season.

ď In addition, the U.S. per capita consumer consumption of mango fruit has increased from 1.2 pounds per person in 1996 to 4.8 pounds in 2013, according to the National Mango Board.Ē

So forum membersí consumption skews the population average.


Spread the word, Mango season in South Florida typically goes from Early March to October if you have enough mango variety. Here's a UF blog mentioning some early & late choices common to S. Fl.    http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/palmbeachco/2018/08/23/mangoes-are-still-in-season/

I still have quite a few mangos available for picking & hope you do toooo...  :P

It is quite easy for one to have tree picked mangos for just over half the year in S. Fl. by planting several varieties.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Help identifying the worms (?)
« on: October 05, 2018, 10:11:12 AM »
Yah, they don't like dry weather. So, I guess they probably wouldn't survive in socal anyway :D.

It appears they didnít make it, problem solved :) I left them in the bottom of the cut box outside, and the dry weather was probably too much for them.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Help identifying the worms (?)
« on: October 04, 2018, 09:54:55 PM »
Pretty sure those yellow banded ones were introduced to florida. They are a little more aggressive than the red ones (which I think are native), making their way into homes.

A quick dip in Sevin will obliterate them.

They are beneficials, but may not want to introduce to Ca.

https://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/mannion/pdfs/Yellow-bandedMillipede.pdf

7
I"m skeptical they can beat Gary Zill :-)

Cookie Monster is a Gator :D

It seems like a highly scientific approach.  I guess we'll see if they come up with any varieties that are better than the new Zill creations.  Go Gators!  (UF is now #8 public university in America--USNews ranking.)

8
haha! It's probably true. I probably go through 500 pounds worth in a typical mango season. Literally put in 10 pounds during the 3 month mango season.

ď In addition, the U.S. per capita consumer consumption of mango fruit has increased from 1.2 pounds per person in 1996 to 4.8 pounds in 2013, according to the National Mango Board.Ē

So forum membersí consumption skews the population average.

9
Yes.

:D Same experience here. Except mine was from budwood that came from the mother tree. Someone must be color blind.

Was that from the budwood I brought you a few years ago?

10
:D Same experience here. Except mine was from budwood that came from the mother tree. Someone must be color blind.

11
I just use granulated fertilizer.. A couple of my trees have deficiencies, but the rest are doing well.

12
I definitely did not follow the instructions. It was an experiment of sorts, and I grossly miscalculated the amount of free calcium carbonate. Surprisingly, most of the trees survived. I did lose several anonas, and my magana sapote looked like it was on the brink of death for a while -- but no more than 10 - 15% tree loss. At any rate, it was a cool experiment :D.

Works extremely well. I've never monitored its use in potted culture, but I was able to (accidentally) lower the pH to about 1/4 acre of my orchard to the low 3's with a couple thousand pounds of Tiger 90. The effect is temporary though. Three years later, the pH was back to the 7's.

Note that it also takes several months for the pH to drop.

 Jeff was that following the directions? Thats an extreme drop and certainly hope it doesn't drop that low in my pots. What plants/trees could even survive in a PH that low?

13
The rise was gradual, with the majority of the rise happening after I installed irrigation (which comes from high pH canal water).

Works extremely well. I've never monitored its use in potted culture, but I was able to (accidentally) lower the pH to about 1/4 acre of my orchard to the low 3's with a couple thousand pounds of Tiger 90. The effect is temporary though. Three years later, the pH was back to the 7's.

Note that it also takes several months for the pH to drop.
3 years doesn't seem very temporary. Or did the pH rise gradually through those 3 years? Did you keep track?

14
Has it fruited yet?

15
Works extremely well. I've never monitored its use in potted culture, but I was able to (accidentally) lower the pH to about 1/4 acre of my orchard to the low 3's with a couple thousand pounds of Tiger 90. The effect is temporary though. Three years later, the pH was back to the 7's.

Note that it also takes several months for the pH to drop.

16
Ca has carib fly now?

17
Interesting. Lived in socal for 30 years, never thought coconut would be possible.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: I am taking out my citrus trees in Miami.
« on: September 24, 2018, 10:05:51 PM »
+1

If you think it hurts to pull a Mineola try what I did.....I had to pull 200 citrus because of Greening in Kendall after having raised them for 14 years. I was the greatest citrus grower anywhere. I sprayed my trees every 2 weeks and yet all but 2 got the disease. Yes the Mineola needed a pollinator. Now I have 250 mango avocado and lychee. And 1 Temple thatís got Greening and this will be itís last season then Iíll pull it out after 17 years. And 2 Yosemite Gold hybrids from California about 15 years old that are somehow still beautiful and green and healthy. If you saw my present trees youíd know how perfect I took care of my citrus. IN MY OPINION THE SALE OF CITRUS TREES TO THE PUBLIC SHOULD BE AGAINST THE LAW BECAUSE THEY ALL GET GREENING WITHIN 5 YEARS. SO WHY TRICK THE UNKNOWING PUBLIC INTO BUYING TREES THAT ARE DESTINED FOR A QUICK DEATH. THE ONLY WAY TO GROW CITRUS NOW IS UNDER NETTING.

In Florida 80% of the citrus or more has greening? Who's tricking anyone? The new regimen is to fertilize year round and
a expect a lighter crop. For private people you can get more then enough fruit for you and your family? If your temple is producing
why pull it? Fertilize the hell out of it and enjoy the fruit you get? You won't get 300 oranges from a mature tree but you should still
get 90.

19
Healthy looking tree doesn't always mean sufficient minerals for fruit set. Sometimes, failure to set can be a mineral deficiency. Not 100% sure that's the case with your saps. But would be worth trying to load them up on micros and high quality N-containing fertilizer. Since saps are tolerant of salt, you can really go wild with the N.

My haysa gets helena's 0-0-6, which contains a lot of micros (like 15% iron from memory + a bunch of others in high amounts), helena's 90% slow release 8-2-12 with sulfur + minors, and Har's special mix (overlap from nearby mangoes), and irrigation twice a week. It's just slightly less productive than my morena.

The Tikal we have planted out in the street will barf out a ton of fruit if I fertilize the heck out of it but is a shy producer otherwise, despite the fact that it's been in ground for about a decade.

Fertilizer is king.

Yeah mine is constantly fed with compost and fertilizer. Blooms a lot with no fruit set.

I do too.. Very healthy looking tree, lots of flowers but not a single fruit.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: I am taking out my citrus trees in Miami.
« on: September 24, 2018, 11:38:02 AM »
Miami soil is going to be tough on citrus. Most of it is marl, which is basically a high-ph clay. It lacks drainage, and it's essentially impossible to drop the pH. Horrible stuff to grow in, but makes a great base for footings, slabs, etc.

North of Miami-Dade generally has much better soil. With a good fertilization regimen and consistent treatment for insects, citrus is very viable.

I know a lot of the folks on this forum are afraid of systemics, but imidacloprid is a good option for keeping your citrus free of insect problems. All of the citrus trees for sale in the state of Florida are treated with imidacloprid (it's an ag regulation to prevent the spread of greening). That's why they look so nice for the first few months after you bring them home.

As far as I know, a high percentage of the conventionally grown produce is treated with imidacloprid. Moreover, it's the main ingredient in the more popular flea and tick products that we give our 4-legged pets. I don't think it's that big of a deal to use on your citrus trees, and it's certainly far less labor intensive.

21
I no longer do complete cutback for top-working. Instead, I'll lop off 1/3 to 1/2 of the tree then graft the resulting sprouts. The rest gets top-worked in the following years. This leaves the tree with foliage and allows it to continue to photosynthesize.

22
Mine produces gobs of fruit, but I keep it very well fertilized, with nitrogen. Has anybody tried feeding theirs on a regular basis with a nitrogen containing fertiilzer?

23
Nice pad. Given how the market is going, you probably already have a couple of offers.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango tipping site looks normal?
« on: September 20, 2018, 07:23:54 PM »
Looks perfectly fine, but I tend to favor cutting it just below the end of a growth flush (ie, a couple of inches below where you've cut it). Cutting right above a growth flush causes too many sprouts.

Tipped the CC a few weeks back. First time doing it. Site is black and crusty looking. Normal?
In the future should I try to do anything different? 45 degree angle perhaps?
Thanks guys!







25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: ID These mangoes (Pics)
« on: September 17, 2018, 05:54:43 PM »
funny. I got mislabeled budwood from Fairchild Farms (harvest moon turned out to be something different). You'd think they'd do a better job of inventorying than that.

Please ID these mangoes, I got them from USDA and buy they also mistag or get things mixed when shipping.

This was supposed to be shehintha (swe-hin-thar) but its not.


This was said to be jahangir but it's not.


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