Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Citradia

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 16
1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Root stock quality??
« on: November 12, 2017, 08:01:14 PM »
My meiwa on FD is in ground and does very well. Got it from Ben Salley in Columbia, SC. You can find him on Facebook at simplycitrusnursery.

2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Warm Water For Winter Greenhouse Irrigation
« on: November 10, 2017, 08:11:53 PM »
Good idea, Millet! That's a lot of free warm water!

3
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Georgia Citrus Seeking to Make Its Mark
« on: October 30, 2017, 09:42:23 PM »
I bet we'll hear more about this at the Southeast Citrus Expo in Savannah this year.

4
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 30, 2017, 05:26:57 PM »
Last night was the first freezeof the season at my house and the low was 29 degrees F, and was freezing or below for 13.5 hours. Trees under cover were fine of course and the new growth on my citranges which were not protected appears unscathed.

5
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 30, 2017, 09:17:10 AM »
Millet, Colorado usually gets cold and snow in October doesn't it? Being originally from FL, that amazes me. I'm sure your greenhouse can hold up a lot of snow! Can you post a pic of your greenhouse? I've imagined it being huge like one at an arboretum since you have in ground trees.  They have a huge in ground grapefruit in a big greenhouse at Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden in Belmont, NC.

6
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 29, 2017, 08:27:32 PM »
32degrees F at 8:00 PM.

7
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 29, 2017, 06:57:19 PM »
Already 33 degrees F here with high winds, predicted to be 50-60 mph tonight. High of 54 degrees F. My stuff is covered. Supposed to get to 29 degrees in Asheville, and since it's snowing, I'll probably end up 5-10 degrees colder than there.

8
Citrus General Discussion / Re: What's New With Florida Citrus Future
« on: October 28, 2017, 06:59:44 AM »
Sounds great. Similar to some apples and pears being resistant to fireblight.

9
Snek, are your hardy citrus grafted, and on what? Trifoliata?

10
Snek, yes, I see now. Nice fruit. I wish I still had my Swingle; it froze to death several years ago in ground. My Dunstans have done well the past few years though, but still too young to fruit.

11
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 26, 2017, 10:24:10 PM »
Millet, no. The plastic meets the ground. When it's warm outside I place blocks of wood or pots or whatever under the edges of plastic on the walls and open door to help vent tree. I've heard of some folks leaving an open gap at bottom of their enclosures and then packing straw or mulch at base to insulate more "on cold nights"; however, it gets extremely cold here and stays cold here for days, nights, weeks. A few years ago it hardly got above freezing for entire month of January. I have too many citrus outside to run around every other day moving piles of straw/mulch. I can open a door in morning before driving to work, and roll it down and tape it shut with strips of duct tape at night. Often it's already below freezing here before I get home from work around 5:30 PM in winter.

12
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 26, 2017, 07:52:35 PM »

This is my old Kimbrough frame that used to have the roll up roof.

13
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 26, 2017, 07:48:19 PM »

This is the Changsha frame covered in plastic with rolled up door.

14
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 26, 2017, 07:42:54 PM »
This is the repaired Rio Red grapefruit frame. Notice the taped up side from damage to plastic when it took flight.  Salvageable.


[/

[url=https://postimg.org/image/17hspe3jkr/]


15
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 26, 2017, 07:19:42 AM »
I used to roll up both sides of the roof of my first frame house using 2x4 with edge of plastic sheeting stapled to it. Would weight the board down when roof in place with cinder block on roof. High winds here would actually lift the roof and dump the block onto the ground. I now staple the entire roof and sides down and leave one of four walls as an unstapled door that has 2x4 stapled to ground end of plastic that I roll up and hang on hooks to vent tree. Door side on east side since high winds usually from north west in winter. I need the wall door to access tree for fruit harvest in December and January.

16
Beautiful trees and fruit, Snek. Your Swingle fruits look very round; usually swingle is lemon/ granade shaped; are you sure it's not Dunstan citrumelo?

17
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 25, 2017, 07:13:13 AM »
LaCasaVerde, pvc snap clamps sound interesting. I'll have to look into that. We redid the roof last night with four 2x2s pitched into pyramid shape and spiked frame down with rebar. Sinking posts into ground when one can as you did there is the best option. How did you make your roof door out of plastic sheeting and attach to pipe frame? Snap clamps?

18
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 23, 2017, 09:29:53 PM »


This is one of the Rio Red grapefruit that got knocked off my tree today when the greenhouse tried to follow Dorothy and Todo to Oz. Skunky smell and didn't taste good, dry. Not ripe, but tried it.

19
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 23, 2017, 09:18:57 PM »
Thank you. I've already been doing this except with lengths of rebar stuck in ground to place the 10 ft pvc pipes on. Some of my trees are too tall now for 10 ft pipe and last year I even lengthened pipe to 15 ft lengths. It's difficult to cover and uncover 7 trees almost every other day in this method, often in the dark and sometimes in freezing rain/ snow storms. The framed-out greenhouse with one side to roll up/down and tape shut is much easier to manage once set up. The problem with my new structure is that it wasn't tied to the ground, yet. I went out today and got more rebar and hardware to attach it to frame after driving spikes into ground on all four sides. I can't sink the 4x4 vertical posts into ground because the two legs of it near house are sitting on the rock gravel French drain along side foundation of house. Planned on staking it down, just didn't know it would take flight in less than 24 hours after putting plastic on it. I'm putting a wood pyramid shaped roof on too with 2x2s; then won't have to worry about pvc possibly collapsing under snow again like it did one year in my high tunnel. No more high tunnel for me by the way. Those ichang and trifoliate hybrids down in the orchard are on their own this winter.

20
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 23, 2017, 03:16:26 PM »
Well, I put up plastic around the big grapefruit frame last night because supposed to rain all day today and then freezing temps and snow next weekend. Didn't stake the frame down yet. Well, the "rain" ended being a full blown mountain-top hurricane blowing from the east instead of west like cold fronts always do except for today, and I come home to the whole greenhouse upside down and over the cliff in front of the house, held up from rolling 100 ft down slope by a large Rowan tree. Had to dismantle entire plastic roof,door, siding, all pipes of roof destroyed. Branches busted on grapefruit tree. I'm really close to pulling the tree out of the ground and slamming a camellia or rose bush in the hole.

21
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: Any Rec's for Persimmons and PawPaws?
« on: October 18, 2017, 06:51:31 PM »
I have jam out of wild/native persimmon and once ripe, I think the taste is just as good as Japanese varieties, just smaller fruit, but is native. My favorite paw paw is Rebecca's Gold; large yellowish fruit matures a little earlier than my local native varieties. Another good one is Prolific; makes a lot of large round fruit with firmer flesh that's easier to spoon out of skin for making jam. You have to process paw paw fruit fast before it goes bad. Keeps up to a week or longer in refrigerator.

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Lights in winter temps and humidity??
« on: October 18, 2017, 07:31:29 AM »
I think having humidity in room will help manage mite problems. I used to bring my potted citrus into my house over winter and with heat pump running and low humidity, even with humidifier near trees, mites get bad and have to take trees outside and hose them down on warm days or put them in shower and rain on them. Since I started putting potted citrus in outdoor greenhouses/plastic cold frames with in ground trees, they don't have mites as bad I think due to a more natural environment with higher humidity, although they go dormant outside same as in ground trees. My potted trees don't put on much growth in house during winter anyway. Lovely collection there, Susanne!

23
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Savanna Citrus Expo
« on: October 17, 2017, 09:11:07 PM »
I'll be there. I've been to four of them so far. It's always informative and an inspirational experience.

24
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 17, 2017, 09:06:32 PM »
Addendum: I also think filling our enclosure with water containers helps to take up volume of air space inside enclosure which is less air for my heater to have to heat up.

25
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Upgraded cold frames for growing trees.
« on: October 17, 2017, 09:02:43 PM »
I think I've seen socalwarm's greenhouse at Big Lots. I'm pretty sure it has a zipper-type door that opens to vent. I would like to have a quick set up green house like that, but I get high winds on top of the mountain here in winter, so I have to have heavy frame work for my coverings. I use black plastic garbage cans, 32 gallon, and spray painted some 5 gallon buckets and some gallon milk jugs to pack around my trees in winter. The black paint flakes off after a few years but so what. I have found that unless the water container is right up against the plant, there is not much thermal protection/ benefit. The plant tissue higher than the top of the water barrel tends to die off with the deep freeze. I've also noticed that when it is extremely cold, single digits or zero Degrees F, unless you have a heater in your plastic covered enclosure, the temperature in the enclosure will drop a degree or two every minute or less even with water barrel and jugs of water in there. Water barrels help some, but I don't think they are as influential as as they are touted to be,at least not in extreme cold situations. I still do them anyway!

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 16
Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers