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Author Topic: Ichang Lemon  (Read 1844 times)

Millet

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Ichang Lemon
« on: June 30, 2016, 09:29:12 PM »
Ichang Lemon is an Ichang papeda crossed with a pummelo (Citrus ichangensis x Citrus maxima).  It originated in China, where it is called Shanguan, which means "fragrant ball".  This very vigorous and spreading tree is quite ornamental, resembling a grapefruit tree with large wide leaves with a flared petiole.  It produces clusters of large bumpy seedy yellow grapefruit like fruits, which can be used like lemons.  The fruit is extremely juicy with each one producing as much as a half cup of juice.  When over ripe, it tastes like grapefruit and is quite edible with a little sugar. The Ichang lemon is very hardy, enduring temperatures down to 10F and below with no permanent damage as long as it is protected from the wind. Uses: Eating, Cooking, Juice.- Silica

Taken from "Hardy Citrus For The Southeast".
« Last Edit: June 30, 2016, 09:32:33 PM by Millet »

Pancrazio

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2016, 09:28:27 AM »
I've got one of them. As for now is just a small plant that i did graft on P. trifoliata just the last year. Looks pretty thorny! More than a yuzu anyway. so i would suggest the plant one where children can't reach.
Will leave the plant outside this winter, i'm curious to see how it behaves.
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kolanp

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2016, 02:23:56 AM »
Can you sell Ichang Lemon seeds?

Citradia

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2016, 07:59:40 PM »
I think Ichang lemon tree is beautiful. Mine have grown well this summer having lost no leaves after a mild winter here with a one or two time low of 10 degrees F inside my high tunnel with garbage cans of water between them. They did lose their leaves the winter before last when lows of zero and one degrees F.  I planted one outside this year that is several years old and 4 ft tall, and am afraid to not cover it with plastic dome this winter. I think I'll just put large garbage can full of water against it and leave uncovered unless high winds with temps in low teens. I saw the large Ichang lemon and Changsha trees that DR Hanna has grown on university grove in Tifton GA during the SE expo two years ago, and was really inspired; his trees were huge and went unprotected out in the open with changshas covered in fruit. The lemons were mostly done fruiting at the time.

manfromyard

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2016, 10:41:44 PM »
Yes, I was at that Tifton grove as well. I wanted an Ichang to taste, but a young man saw one first and jumped and took it. I didn't see any more then. I have a grafted one in a pot that I hope will fruit in a year or two....

Citradia

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2016, 08:50:58 PM »
Manfromyard, where did you get a grafted Ichang? I wish they were commonly grafted along with citranges and other hardy citrus so those of us in colder climes can have something truly hardy that will produce without having to be 10 years old on its own roots and 20 ft tall.

manfromyard

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2016, 11:21:22 PM »
I pestered Stan Mckenzie for 3 years. He somehow had one sitting around last year (because these are not usually grafted at all) and I snatched it up.
Sometimes you just have to stay open. I snatched up a Yuzuquat from someone else 2 years ago just by having space in may car and some cash.
I have 4 or so seedling Bloomsweets that I can't give away. No-one wants them.....


Fabio

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2017, 04:43:04 PM »
I have a posibility to buy a Ichang Lemon, but I didnt know if they are good tasting fruits, does anyone have tasted the fruit ?

Citradia

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2017, 07:35:27 PM »
I got an Ichang lemon several years ago from a grower in VA. I made lemonade out of just the one lemon; they are huge and full of juice. I thought I tasted great. A huge lemon that puts off a strong lemon fragrance that was strong enough to act as an air freshener just setting it on the kitchen counter. I think it's an amazing fruit , and I really hope mine will perform well here. The fruit is full of seeds, so I was able to get a lot of seedlings from one fruit.

Laaz

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2017, 08:03:05 PM »
Yuck!

Allie

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2017, 12:36:05 PM »
I have a posibility to buy a Ichang Lemon, but I didnt know if they are good tasting fruits, does anyone have follixin from https://www.nacaanet.org/follixin-review-results tasted the fruit ?

I think they taste delicious but my sisters say they taste horrible. You should definitely try it though.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2017, 05:23:31 AM by Allie »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Ichang Lemon
« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2017, 12:16:38 AM »


Ichang Lemon

It is also called Shangyuan and is widely grown and used in some regions of China to perfume rooms and cabinets. The Chinese name Hsiang Yuan means "fragrant ball". It exists in several varieties and is able to withstand colder temperatures than the mandarin or kumquat. In the US it has been used for lemon pie and some connoisseurs think the juice makes a better flavored pie than lemons. Each fruit can yield up to a half cup of juice, but is very seedy. The rind oil has a strong flavor. It forms a small tree and is very thorny.

From the research I've been reading about, it seems it may have almost the same level of cold hardiness as Yuzu, which is really saying a lot.

here is from another source:

Hsiang YŁan, Sangyuan, Shangyuan, Xiang yuan
'Ichang lemon' originates in Hsing shan, Hupeh province, central China. It was discovered by E.H. Wilson and it probably is a natural cross of ichandarin C. junos Sieb. ex Tan. and ichang papeda. According to other sources it is a cross of a shaddock and ichang papeda. That's why it was referred to as shaddock in the past.
The tree is average, very thorny. Its leaves are elliptic, heart-shaped and have wings on their petioles. These small wings usually overgrow to the leaf part and cover about 1/4 of the leaf. Leaves are softer than those of orange or lemon, dark green and have sturdier petiole. It could be classified as frost hardy variety, it can take about -10įC without any damage and can be grown in cooler areas with proper protection. The fruit is usually elongated, slightly pointed and about 7-11cm long. Its rind is yellow, pebbled, thin (2mm), well attached to the pulp. The pulp is yellow, sour, aromatic, sometimes hot and tastes like a lemon, better than citranges. It has typical, intense aroma and is divided into 10-12 segments with lots of seeds (often polyembrionic, usually about 40 seeds). It is also very juicy and can be used for preparing refreshing drinks. It is an excellent rootstock that has (in case of oranges) increased the production rate by 15% (Botanical garden in Batumi). This variety is also used in China to perfume the room and that's what it's name came from, 'Hsiang YŁan' means aromatic balls. The fruit is in USA used in baking, because the hot air eliminates the bitter flavor.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 01:22:23 AM by SoCal2warm »

 

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