Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Dragon Fruit thread.  (Read 250352 times)

SandyL

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 64
    • Nor Cal
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2175 on: August 10, 2017, 07:56:15 PM »
Anyone has tasted or grown Maria Rosa vareity? I can't find much info on it besides it being a somewhat pink flesh variety with slight lemon flavor and refreshing taste.


Never heard of it until I Googled it.

Was Spicy Exotics your source?
http://www.spicyexotics.com/product/maria-rosa/

They say; "This plant is also self-sterile making it a great choice for beginner gardeners or commercial growing."  ???


Yup, that's the source. I'm just wondering if it's worth growing compared to s8 when one is limited in space.
Hmmm... I think I'll have to sleep on this one.


If you are limited in space...  I bet most people would recommend S-8.


Yeah I think so too. Thanks. I'm gonna stick to S8 for now.   :)

fyliu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2896
    • Burbank/Covina, CA 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2176 on: August 10, 2017, 09:17:10 PM »
Yeah, S8 I gave it to a friend who doesn't garden. I go water their plants twice a year and they still get 5 fruits.

wayne23

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 71
    • San Gabriel, CA 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2177 on: August 10, 2017, 10:06:58 PM »
Yeah, S8 I gave it to a friend who doesn't garden. I go water their plants twice a year and they still get 5 fruits.

Haha Fang.  Your magic touch.  I need you to come water my plants ;)

funlul

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 389
    • SoCal zone 10a SGV
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2178 on: August 11, 2017, 01:50:24 PM »
Yeah, S8 I gave it to a friend who doesn't garden. I go water their plants twice a year and they still get 5 fruits.

Put me on the waiting list for magic watering too lol
Looking for scionwoods: loquat, cherimoya, jujube, chocolate perssimon

SandyL

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 64
    • Nor Cal
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2179 on: August 11, 2017, 09:51:48 PM »
Yeah, S8 I gave it to a friend who doesn't garden. I go water their plants twice a year and they still get 5 fruits.

Count me in too 😂😂

pineislander

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 310
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2180 on: August 12, 2017, 07:18:15 AM »
Anyone using coco coir sheets on their DF supports?  Saw a guy on youtube showing his off.  Seems better than burlap.  Costs more...  That guy may be a member here.  Forgot his youtube handle, hes an older guy who wheres tie dye and looks like hes in Florida probably.
He is in Hawaii. Here is his video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0B_HOjullg

I'm getting started with DF. It looks like a good idea if DF do feed using the aerial roots. Is there real evidence for that?

If so, I'm considering making a "sock" to wrap around the concrete posts I'm building. It would consist of two layers of shade cloth with home produced shredded coir layered inside then wrapped around the post before planting. The materials are available to me free for the labor.

This is the post design I plan to use, will make 10 of these. I have a nice local variety which has shown to be self-fertile and likely self pollinating. pink inside and reasonably good flavor.
 




Also, I noticed that at nighttime in our area large moths are attracted to flowering Four-O-Clock plants (Mirabilis jalapa)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirabilis_jalapa

These are very easy to grow from seed, so I'll underplant them to attract pollinators.

ricshaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1388
    • USA, Southern California, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • ricshaw805 YouTube Channel
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2181 on: August 12, 2017, 11:27:41 AM »

I'm getting started with DF. It looks like a good idea if DF do feed using the aerial roots. Is there real evidence for that?


I found aerial roots, on the shady side of the post, on my Halley's Comet going all the way down into the soil.





IMO Somebody needs to plant two identical Dragon Fruit plants, side-by-side, on identical post trellis, one with burlap, one without any covering to see if this is really that beneficial.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2017, 11:35:11 AM by ricshaw »

pineislander

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 310
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2182 on: August 12, 2017, 12:40:07 PM »
I ran across this recently published video of industrial scale DF production and processing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0V11I-2w45g

spaugh

  • Amatuer gardener
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 439
    • Poway, San Diego County, California 9B, sunset 21
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2183 on: August 12, 2017, 01:45:05 PM »

I'm getting started with DF. It looks like a good idea if DF do feed using the aerial roots. Is there real evidence for that?


I found aerial roots, on the shady side of the post, on my Halley's Comet going all the way down into the soil.





IMO Somebody needs to plant two identical Dragon Fruit plants, side-by-side, on identical post trellis, one with burlap, one without any covering to see if this is really that beneficial.

Seems like it can't hurt to feed theough those roots.  I have some posts setup with coco liner after seeing it on youtube.  Its much thicker than burlap and made for this type of application.  And it doesn't degrade as quickly.  I just wrap and staple with 9/16" T50 staple gun.   



« Last Edit: August 12, 2017, 01:46:43 PM by spaugh »

RobPatterson

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 115
    • Ontario, California
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2184 on: August 12, 2017, 10:19:04 PM »
I believe coco liner can have high (relatively) levels of salt in it, based on where it comes from. I don't know that for certain, it was just something I was told once. I have no idea if there are varying degrees of coco, as Ive always used burlap. As for the aerial roots themselves, they are both a natural part of the plants design and a benefit for growers. They stabilize plants on structures and allow for additional water and nutrients to enter the plants system. However, you have to be very careful not to overdo it with fertilizers on the aerial roots, as you could end up burning them if the mix is too strong. I always spray my posts when I water, to moisten the burlap and air roots, and they continue to grow and develop. Keep in mind, that these are the same roots as are under the ground. When a cutting starts showing new root growth, its actually the air roots youre seeing. They just develop a type of thick skin if not kept moist, as they would be most of the time underground.
Ive seen entire plants completely removed from the soil by damage or rot, living just fine off the remaining air root systems that managed to get back into the earth. Do not underestimate the value of the air rooting systems.

ricshaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1388
    • USA, Southern California, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • ricshaw805 YouTube Channel
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2185 on: August 13, 2017, 01:44:18 AM »
I believe coco liner can have high (relatively) levels of salt in it, based on where it comes from. I don't know that for certain, it was just something I was told once. I have no idea if there are varying degrees of coco, as Ive always used burlap. As for the aerial roots themselves, they are both a natural part of the plants design and a benefit for growers. They stabilize plants on structures and allow for additional water and nutrients to enter the plants system. However, you have to be very careful not to overdo it with fertilizers on the aerial roots, as you could end up burning them if the mix is too strong. I always spray my posts when I water, to moisten the burlap and air roots, and they continue to grow and develop. Keep in mind, that these are the same roots as are under the ground. When a cutting starts showing new root growth, its actually the air roots youre seeing. They just develop a type of thick skin if not kept moist, as they would be most of the time underground.
Ive seen entire plants completely removed from the soil by damage or rot, living just fine off the remaining air root systems that managed to get back into the earth. Do not underestimate the value of the air rooting systems.


FYI: Coco coir use to contain a lot of salt. The reason was during the processing it was rinsed with saltwater.
Guess what? As coco coir became popular as a growing medium, the better companies, rinse and wash the coir to flush out salts. The bricks of coir sold now by the better companies do not have the issues with high salt.
Example: http://a.co/bnT8jnc
« Last Edit: August 13, 2017, 01:56:12 AM by ricshaw »

SandyL

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 64
    • Nor Cal
    • View Profile

spaugh

  • Amatuer gardener
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 439
    • Poway, San Diego County, California 9B, sunset 21
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2187 on: August 13, 2017, 10:50:54 AM »
I believe coco liner can have high (relatively) levels of salt in it, based on where it comes from. I don't know that for certain, it was just something I was told once. I have no idea if there are varying degrees of coco, as Ive always used burlap. As for the aerial roots themselves, they are both a natural part of the plants design and a benefit for growers. They stabilize plants on structures and allow for additional water and nutrients to enter the plants system. However, you have to be very careful not to overdo it with fertilizers on the aerial roots, as you could end up burning them if the mix is too strong. I always spray my posts when I water, to moisten the burlap and air roots, and they continue to grow and develop. Keep in mind, that these are the same roots as are under the ground. When a cutting starts showing new root growth, its actually the air roots youre seeing. They just develop a type of thick skin if not kept moist, as they would be most of the time underground.
Ive seen entire plants completely removed from the soil by damage or rot, living just fine off the remaining air root systems that managed to get back into the earth. Do not underestimate the value of the air rooting systems.


FYI: Coco coir use to contain a lot of salt. The reason was during the processing it was rinsed with saltwater.
Guess what? As coco coir became popular as a growing medium, the better companies, rinse and wash the coir to flush out salts. The bricks of coir sold now by the better companies do not have the issues with high salt.
Example: http://a.co/bnT8jnc


Seems like any salts would get washed out with a quick soaking of the hose anyway.  Just like fertilizer.  Its not going stick around long.  I figure once the roots attach to it and the plants get larger I can use a sprayer with some dynagrow disolved in water or seaweed/fish emulsion type feetilizer to wet the coco.

TheWaterbug

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 286
    • Palos Verdes, CA, Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783'
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2188 on: August 14, 2017, 12:43:43 AM »
Is this true!? I hope so!


https://www.freshfruitportal.com/news/2017/08/03/ecuador-gears-first-dragon-fruit-shipments-u-s-september/


Interesting quote:
Quote

“This gives us a competitive advantage since the yellow dragon fruit…has much larger sizes, higher Brix levels, and a high vitamin C content.”
« Last Edit: August 14, 2017, 12:45:21 AM by TheWaterbug »
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

pineislander

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 310
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2189 on: August 14, 2017, 08:15:34 AM »
My neighbor has a selection of unidentified cereus shich were left behind when the nursery she bought went out of business.
I'm attaching photos of two of these. in case anyone here can help ID these.

The first appears to me to be Selenicereus Megalanthus, yellow dragon fruit, based on the semi-circular scalloped edges. Do you agree?





The second has straight edges different from any cereus I've seen. Any idea what this is?





ricshaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1388
    • USA, Southern California, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • ricshaw805 YouTube Channel
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2190 on: August 14, 2017, 12:01:31 PM »

The second has straight edges different from any cereus I've seen. Any idea what this is?





The second one looks like/may be Valdivia Roja from Mexico (no connection to Edgar Valdivia).

Dr. Douhan's DNA testing put Valdivia Roja as H. ocamponis.

My Valdivia Roja for comparison.


fyliu

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2896
    • Burbank/Covina, CA 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2191 on: August 14, 2017, 01:28:29 PM »
It looks thorny for Valdivia Roja. I was thinking it's similar to Lisa. I hope my Lisa is the real thing.

The first one might be yellow, or it might be the fake yellow I got from a FL seller on eBay many years ago. It shows that purple coloration especially when stressed by cold or moderate drought. The fruit turned out to be deep red and spherical.

pineislander

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 310
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2192 on: August 14, 2017, 02:29:25 PM »

The second has straight edges different from any cereus I've seen. Any idea what this is?






The second one looks like/may be Valdivia Roja from Mexico (no connection to Edgar Valdivia).

Dr. Douhan's DNA testing put Valdivia Roja as H. ocamponis.

My Valdivia Roja for comparison.



No, I don't think it can be Valdivia Roja/Ocamponis. Look at the pictures and you can see absolutely no undulation of the margins, none at all.

This is a closeup of Ocamponis:
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/6310469

Here is a comparison. The unknown has very straight margins.


The first plant which I suspect is Megalanthus hasn't fruited yet, but another example on the proeprty with same leaf scalloped margins did fruit and the owner recalls it was spiny and yellow.

funlul

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 389
    • SoCal zone 10a SGV
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2193 on: August 14, 2017, 02:44:22 PM »
This year I'll compare some of my df varieties to S8 in terms of flavor and productivity. May end up removing some of them and replace with "worthier" varieties.

Lisa is one of them on this list.
Looking for scionwoods: loquat, cherimoya, jujube, chocolate perssimon

Dangermouse01

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 270
  • East coast, Central Florida
    • USA, Palm Bay, FL 32907, Zone 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2194 on: August 14, 2017, 04:20:48 PM »

The second has straight edges different from any cereus I've seen. Any idea what this is?





My Cebra has straight edges like that.



DM
« Last Edit: August 14, 2017, 04:27:58 PM by Dangermouse01 »

pineislander

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 310
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2195 on: August 14, 2017, 04:48:17 PM »

The second has straight edges different from any cereus I've seen. Any idea what this is?






My Cebra has straight edges like that.



DM


Odd, because Matt's Landscape shows stems with both straight and wavy margins (stem on plate) here:
http://mattslandscape.com/detail/?plant_name=Cebra%20Dragon%20Fruit%20Hybrid

pineislander

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 310
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2196 on: August 14, 2017, 04:59:31 PM »
For my new DF planting I took down an older DF plant which had shown nice fruit and did not need hand pollination. The plant was growing up into a large Royal Poinciana tree and I took down about 90% of the stems, leavin only the rootstock and main stem, about 8 feet. I made all cuts in natural breaks of the stem, and did no cuts into fleshy parts. This yielded pieces from 2 inches to 3 feet long, some mature and some actively growing tips.

My questions:
1. What is the best propagating material out of the selection shown here?
2. I have about 10 pieces of each size shown. I'll be planting four cuttings on each of 8 concrete posts.
Should I mix the different size cuttings on each post, or plant similar size cuttings on each post?



ricshaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1388
    • USA, Southern California, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • ricshaw805 YouTube Channel
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2197 on: August 14, 2017, 06:24:06 PM »

My Valdivia Roja for comparison.



No, I don't think it can be Valdivia Roja/Ocamponis. Look at the pictures and you can see absolutely no undulation of the margins, none at all.

This is a closeup of Ocamponis:
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/6310469

Here is a comparison. The unknown has very straight margins.



Did you look closely at mine? I think it has "straight margins".

You can't go by one or two pictures from the internet. H. ocamponis can have variations. I am not saying yours (picture on the right above) is Valdivia Roja, it looks like it could be closely related to Valdivia Roja (or Lisa) or any thorny red flesh variety.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2017, 06:25:44 PM by ricshaw »

ricshaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1388
    • USA, Southern California, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
    • ricshaw805 YouTube Channel
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2198 on: August 14, 2017, 06:28:49 PM »

1. What is the best propagating material out of the selection shown here?


IMO the best propagating material is half bagged potting soil, half Perlite (or 100% Perlite).

JF

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5697
  • North Orange County Zone 10B Sunset 24
    • View Profile
Re: Dragon Fruit thread.
« Reply #2199 on: August 14, 2017, 07:14:00 PM »







 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers