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Author Topic: HLB Infected Tree Found Near UCR's Citrus Variety Collection In Riverside  (Read 662 times)


Susanne42

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This really is very sad. I just hope that they can find a cure before many varieties are lost.
Maybe they should move to norther states to protect the collection. Need only one of the little bug to create damage.

fyliu

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They have buds frozen dried in a Colorado vault. Many for each variety, so that they'll still have some after losing a few to thawing, rehydrating, bud mutations. They keep testing them to make sure it works. As of the last time I visited UCR for citrus day this year, they were close to done with all the varieties in their collection. Coming up with the procedures is the hard part I think.

Susanne42

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that sounds a little bit hopeful I guess

countryboy1981

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Aren't the trees kept indoors where the acp can't get to them?

fyliu

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Yeah, they're in a screen house with very fine mesh screens. Workers can only go in there first thing when they arrive to work, and definitely not after they've gone to the field.

There's only budwood from screen house for a few years. They used to take budwood from the foundation blocks outside, but not after ACP.

Millet

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fyliu, your confusing the CCPP with the Variety Collection.   The CCPP is located inside the screen house.  Also, other people than the workers can go into the screen house, or at least used to.  I know this because my buddy and I went all through the Variety Collection and all through the CCPP screen house, and we were only tourists..
« Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 08:53:00 PM by Millet »

countryboy1981

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Is there a specific type of mesh/screen that needs to be used to keep out the acp?  Additionally, if ants transport the acp, how could they be kept out froming coming underneath the screenhouse?

Chupa King

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Surprised they havnt modified the Citrus yet to tolerate pests and disease.
Biodiversity is key.

fyliu

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I meant CCPP used to offer "foundation budwood" from non-screen house trees before ACP was a thing.

At UCR, they didn't allow visitors to go into the screen house earlier this year with the rule I said above. It sounded like the workers themselves weren't allowed to go in at that point, after showing us around the collection. Diseases in the soil or something. They didn't say no visitors allowed, just not after going through the fields in the morning.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 05:18:14 PM by fyliu »

Millet

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Now a second citrus tree infected with HLB found in Riverside California. Agriculture officials said they received notice of a positive test late Monday for an orange tree on a property adjacent to the one where the first tree to test positive for citrus greening was found earlier this summer. Both trees are near the 60/91/215 freeway interchange. The second tree was removed Wednesday.

countryboy1981

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The question is how quickly do the current tests identify whether the tree is infected with HLB?

Millet

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Re: HLB Infected Tree Found Near UCR's Citrus Variety Collection In Riverside
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2017, 10:08:41 AM »
Its been a full month since the first HLB tree was found in Riverside.  How many psyllids that fed on that three have now flown to other trees to feed and spread the disease?  It takes up to several years for an infected tree to show symptoms, there could possibly be many more trees with HLB to show up

Susanne42

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Re: HLB Infected Tree Found Near UCR's Citrus Variety Collection In Riverside
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2017, 12:08:33 PM »
Somebody on another forum posted the sad sights in Florida where citrus groves are abandoned because of the greening. What makes me sad is that the infected trees were not removed. Why? No risk when they are dead?
I hope they are more diligent in California.

fyliu

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Re: HLB Infected Tree Found Near UCR's Citrus Variety Collection In Riverside
« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2017, 03:35:16 PM »
I think no risk after they're dried out. That's why I heard recommendation to not put citrus cuttings in trash until they are dry. The bugs probably jump off them like fleas from dead squirrels.

Millet

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Re: HLB Infected Tree Found Near UCR's Citrus Variety Collection In Riverside
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2017, 07:53:48 PM »
Yes, but it takes a long time before the abandon trees dry out enough for the psyllid to leave them alone.   Meanwhile it is a field day  for the psyllids.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2017, 09:52:08 PM by Millet »


Farmerche

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Re: HLB Infected Tree Found Near UCR's Citrus Variety Collection In Riverside
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2017, 08:41:34 PM »
Somebody on another forum posted the sad sights in Florida where citrus groves are abandoned because of the greening. What makes me sad is that the infected trees were not removed. Why? No risk when they are dead?
I hope they are more diligent in California.
To be fair the cat is pretty far out of the bag down there. I think now they are focused on resistance in rootstocks and management of diseased yet producing  trees. Unfortunately, it looks like it's out of the bag in California now too.

mrtexas

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Re: HLB Infected Tree Found Near UCR's Citrus Variety Collection In Riverside
« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2017, 08:43:35 PM »
Same thing happened to the Florida foundation block in Lake Alfred. Citrus are going the way of chestnut trees.

 

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