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Author Topic: 1st successful mango graft?  (Read 725 times)

561MangoFanatic

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1st successful mango graft?
« on: July 31, 2017, 12:54:09 PM »


So it looks like my 1st successful graft!! ;D😁



Should I remove all the old parafilm & re-wrap where I grafted with more parafilm or is it unnecessary??
Thanks for your help!!!
Serg

simon_grow

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2017, 01:20:54 PM »
Congratulations, it's ok to leave the parafilm on but I usually take it off in order to should trapping water pockets which can promote fungal growth.

Simon

skhan

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2017, 02:04:15 PM »
Great job!!!
Soon you might run into the problem of not knowing when to stop top working and multi-grafting trees...like me

TheDom

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2017, 06:30:32 PM »
Well done! What variety?

Don't re-wrap, it is healed at this point. You can remove the parafilm, but it isn't really necessary.
Dom

561MangoFanatic

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2017, 10:21:30 AM »
Thank You guys!  :D😁 ;D Har helped teach me how to prep the scions "out in the field" & then I repeatedly watched Pete Kanaris's new Grafting video with Dr Campbell & finally got cleft grafting. Now I want to get veneers to take lol..

Simon, I took your advice & removed the old parafilm as it had holes throughout & I didn't want to take any chance of harming it with all the rain we had yesterday.. especially didn't want any issues at the graft point with water getting in, so I resealed with graft tape. See -



Sayyid, I absolutely know what you mean brotha!!! Been waiting to actually getting it down so I can graft disease resistant varieties out west at my parent's house where I'm able to plant trees freely. & Unfortunately the NDM, CCream, & the Cac scions I was giving by another forum member never took as I improperly prepped the scions & did not graft using the proper Knife for grafting. Oh well, I'm sure he'll see this post & hopefully he'll take some scions as a Thank You & be willing to trade more scions...


Dom, Thanks for your help! I had rewrapped at the grafting point just as a precaution to keep water out for now. So this very nice older lady was kind enough to give me a branch from her massive Glenn tree she has that I seen driving in North Palm Beach. This one that took is on my Venus Tree. The scions I tried to veneer on to my Carrie didn't survive. (Should've cleft to top work over to a multi variety tree but that time will come!)

Serg

561MangoFanatic

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2017, 03:12:04 PM »



Took a nice wedge out of my finger after my grafting knife got stuck in some hard budwood.. learned the hard way but at least I was able to get a graft to take.  ::)
Serg

behlgarden

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2017, 05:49:29 PM »
Congrats on first success. word of caution, I have lost several grafts when I used to use parafilm, notice how it splits at the union and it potentially kills unhealed grafts, specially here in SO Cal. Now on fragile grafts I use buddy tape that expands along with the union and on more mature wood I use green nursery tape to tightly wrap the union. Take out the nursery tape once it pushes and then wrap again (thinly) with either buddy tape or parafilm.

Mark in Texas

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2017, 08:03:39 AM »
Congratulations, it's ok to leave the parafilm on but I usually take it off in order to should trapping water pockets which can promote fungal growth.

Simon

Yep, have lost a few mango grafts to just that.  Am real careful now when wrapping the scion and have found that Buddy Tape does a better job because it's so sticky.....seals better than parafilm.

CA Hockey

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2017, 09:42:15 AM »
Can you do that for citrus t budding as well? My first round of bud grafts were white and fuzzy 3 weeks afterwards. Needless to say none survived. I wasn't sure where the moisture came in from - trapped air within the wrapping or from sap from the cut tissues.

FrankDrebinOfFruits

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2017, 02:56:37 PM »
Thank You guys!  :D😁 ;D Har helped teach me how to prep the scions "out in the field"

Please elaborate!

I went from 0% success about three years ago, to 90% success 2 years ago, to 0% success last year. Found my knife was the main culprit (bad sharpening).  I switched to the bics razor a month ago, now back at 30%. Hoping to get better.

WonderKeeper

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2017, 05:36:17 AM »
Congratulations.
 

561MangoFanatic

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2017, 10:17:51 AM »
Thanks everyone!! I've been noticing the same thing stated by others about the parafilm & have not yet invested into BuddyTape yet.



Thank You guys!  :D ;D Har helped teach me how to prep the scions "out in the field"

Please elaborate!

I went from 0% success about three years ago, to 90% success 2 years ago, to 0% success last year. Found my knife was the main culprit (bad sharpening).  I switched to the bics razor a month ago, now back at 30%. Hoping to get better.


So Har showed/told me how to keep the branches/limbs healthy until I was able to get them home & wrap them in the parafilm. 1st any plastic bag or garbage bag will be needed. & 2nd a source of water. Then choose your branches for grafting, cut them down, & either completely drench or submerge in water, & then place your branches in the plastic bag.(darker bags work better for keeping direct sunlight off of them.) Whenever you get ready to wrap your scions make sure to take the branches out of the bag, cut the leaves off & dry the budwood off with papertowels & let them dry for 15mins. before wrapping up the budwood for grafting. I've then sanitize my grafting Knife with rubbing alcohol and now I have everything ready for grafting.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2017, 08:29:36 PM by 561MangoFanatic »
Serg

simon_grow

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2017, 12:55:05 PM »
When preparing scion materials, I've found it extremely beneficial to remove leaves from the scions while still attached to the plant. This will cause the buds to swell behind the cut leaves and will also swell the apical bud. If the buds are already swollen, this is no big deal but it will still help to retain more moisture in the scion by cutting the leaves off early because as soon as you cut the leaves, some sap will push out.

Simon

FrankDrebinOfFruits

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2017, 06:01:25 PM »
Thanks everyone!! I've been noticing the same thing stated by others about the parafilm & have not yet invested into BuddyTape yet.



Thank You guys!  :D😁 ;D Har helped teach me how to prep the scions "out in the field"

Please elaborate!

I went from 0% success about three years ago, to 90% success 2 years ago, to 0% success last year. Found my knife was the main culprit (bad sharpening).  I switched to the bics razor a month ago, now back at 30%. Hoping to get better.


So Har showed/told me how to keep the branches/limbs healthy until I was able to get them home & wrap them in the parafilm. 1st any plastic bag or garbage bag will be needed. & 2nd a source of water. Then choose your branches for grafting, cut them down, & either completely drench or submerge in water, & then place your branches in the plastic bag.(darker bags work better for keeping direct sunlight off of them.) Whenever you get ready to wrap your scions make sure to take the branches out of the bag, cut the leaves off & dry the budwood off with papertowels & let them dry for 15mins. before wrapping up the budwood for grafting. I've then sanitize my grafting with rubbing alcohol and now I have everything ready for grafting.

Thanks for replying. Going to put these notes in my journal.

9B in Brazil

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2017, 12:14:24 PM »
Congrats Serg. Now you need to learn how to do a skin graft.  I'm going to try grafting my mangoes next month in Brazil.  I hope I have success like you.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2017, 12:16:03 PM by 9B in Brazil »
I am an American from California/Rhode Island with a small farm in Southern Brazil.  (zone 9B)
Sou um americano da Califórnia e Rhode Island.  Eu tenho um sítio em Brusque, SC.

Marc Doyle

561MangoFanatic

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #15 on: August 15, 2017, 10:32:31 AM »
Thanks for replying. Going to put these notes in my journal.
[/quote]

Absolutely!!  If you have time to prep your scions by cutting the branches as Simon stated, they'll do much better with those swollen buds. Also I had forgotten to state that the water you used should be cool to warm. Never cold or hot as you WILL Kill your scions!! Good luck Frank!

& Good luck Marc!!! Im hoping that you both are very successful in your next attempts at grafting!!! 😁 ;D
Serg

Zarafet

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2017, 03:54:08 PM »
That happened to me when I grafted my CCPP New Zealand  lemonade to my Meyer lemon,  the graft took so muy blood,  sweat, and tears were worth it, it's a rare truly sweet lemon, can't wait for my harvest.





Took a nice wedge out of my finger after my grafting knife got stuck in some hard budwood.. learned the hard way but at least I was able to get a graft to take.  ::)

561MangoFanatic

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2017, 04:06:32 PM »
Sucks it happens but it's awesome & so worth it when you get a graft to take, especially when you have a rare gem like that!! Good luck with your harvest!! I hope you post it whenever you harvest 👌🏽

That happened to me when I grafted my CCPP New Zealand  lemonade to my Meyer lemon,  the graft took so muy blood,  sweat, and tears were worth it, it's a rare truly sweet lemon, can't wait for my harvest.





Took a nice wedge out of my finger after my grafting knife got stuck in some hard budwood.. learned the hard way but at least I was able to get a graft to take.  ::)
Serg

Zarafet

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2017, 04:14:25 PM »
The irony of the Story is that when I cut myself I had one more graft to make, And after wrapping my hand I said screw this and I did it as quick as possible without any effort to make it work other than ensuring that the cambium layers matched. Which means that the ones that took me longer due to me being detail-oriented and OCD did not take but the one that I haphazardly put together took. This kind of goes along with what has been mentioned here that sometimes we baby our trees too much when there are so many others who neglect them and have excellent results.

Definitely food for thought for me.

Sucks it happens but it's awesome & so worth it when you get a graft to take, especially when you have a rare gem like that!! Good luck with your harvest!! I hope you post it whenever you harvest 👌🏽

That happened to me when I grafted my CCPP New Zealand  lemonade to my Meyer lemon,  the graft took so muy blood,  sweat, and tears were worth it, it's a rare truly sweet lemon, can't wait for my harvest.





Took a nice wedge out of my finger after my grafting knife got stuck in some hard budwood.. learned the hard way but at least I was able to get a graft to take.  ::)

561MangoFanatic

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2017, 11:53:48 AM »
The irony of the Story is that when I cut myself I had one more graft to make, And after wrapping my hand I said screw this and I did it as quick as possible without any effort to make it work other than ensuring that the cambium layers matched. Which means that the ones that took me longer due to me being detail-oriented and OCD did not take but the one that I haphazardly put together took. This kind of goes along with what has been mentioned here that sometimes we baby our trees too much when there are so many others who neglect them and have excellent results.

Definitely food for thought for me.

Sucks it happens but it's awesome & so worth it when you get a graft to take, especially when you have a rare gem like that!! Good luck with your harvest!! I hope you post it whenever you harvest 👌🏽

That happened to me when I grafted my CCPP New Zealand  lemonade to my Meyer lemon,  the graft took so muy blood,  sweat, and tears were worth it, it's a rare truly sweet lemon, can't wait for my harvest.





Took a nice wedge out of my finger after my grafting knife got stuck in some hard budwood.. learned the hard way but at least I was able to get a graft to take.  ::)


I know what you mean!! I remember I was kinda rushing with the first five I tried grafting & this sixth one I just tried to remain relaxed as Dr Campbell said since I had more time than before & then I tried applying everything he said & apparently it worked! Funny that after doing this particular graft that took is when I cut myself.. I'm glad it took because I wanted to use up the rest of the scions and had a hard time grafting after getting cut!! Now I try to focus on being relaxed, having clean tools, & most importantly how I make my cuts! I've heard stories of others having success with plastic grocery bags for grafting tape & any knife but I was never so lucky 😂
Serg

Clay

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2017, 01:51:40 PM »
When preparing scion materials, I've found it extremely beneficial to remove leaves from the scions while still attached to the plant. This will cause the buds to swell behind the cut leaves and will also swell the apical bud. If the buds are already swollen, this is no big deal but it will still help to retain more moisture in the scion by cutting the leaves off early because as soon as you cut the leaves, some sap will push out.

Simon

"Mango Professor" posted a pretty good video a few years ago that demonstrates this.  You can fine it at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdSCrqglcTc.
<<<< Clay >>>>
Orange County, CA 92626

Zarafet

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2017, 06:49:58 PM »
That's what I do. I parafilm everything after I match the cambiums THEN I make strips of grocery bags and use that to tighten the union. I use a box cutter to graft and I now have a very high success rate.

The irony of the Story is that when I cut myself I had one more graft to make, And after wrapping my hand I said screw this and I did it as quick as possible without any effort to make it work other than ensuring that the cambium layers matched. Which means that the ones that took me longer due to me being detail-oriented and OCD did not take but the one that I haphazardly put together took. This kind of goes along with what has been mentioned here that sometimes we baby our trees too much when there are so many others who neglect them and have excellent results.

Definitely food for thought for me.

Sucks it happens but it's awesome & so worth it when you get a graft to take, especially when you have a rare gem like that!! Good luck with your harvest!! I hope you post it whenever you harvest 👌🏽

That happened to me when I grafted my CCPP New Zealand  lemonade to my Meyer lemon,  the graft took so muy blood,  sweat, and tears were worth it, it's a rare truly sweet lemon, can't wait for my harvest.





Took a nice wedge out of my finger after my grafting knife got stuck in some hard budwood.. learned the hard way but at least I was able to get a graft to take.  ::)


I know what you mean!! I remember I was kinda rushing with the first five I tried grafting & this sixth one I just tried to remain relaxed as Dr Campbell said since I had more time than before & then I tried applying everything he said & apparently it worked! Funny that after doing this particular graft that took is when I cut myself.. I'm glad it took because I wanted to use up the rest of the scions and had a hard time grafting after getting cut!! Now I try to focus on being relaxed, having clean tools, & most importantly how I make my cuts! I've heard stories of others having success with plastic grocery bags for grafting tape & any knife but I was never so lucky 😂

561MangoFanatic

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Re: 1st successful mango graft?
« Reply #22 on: August 20, 2017, 11:38:55 AM »
Thank You Clay for posting that! ;D  & Thank you too Zarafet!! Going to try the strips next time also!😁
Serg

 

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