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Author Topic: Real-world examples of polyembryonic mangoes here?  (Read 323 times)

fliptop

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Real-world examples of polyembryonic mangoes here?
« on: August 11, 2017, 08:25:18 PM »
I was curious if anyone here has actually grown polyembryonic mango seedlings to fruition and proven it works as it's "supposed to"--with the seedling producing fruit that closely resembles the parent.

I have three seedling Ataulfo mango trees growing that emerged from the same seed. The trees are three years old now and are at or just above six feet tall (well, five feet not counting the containers). Out of the many Ataulfo mango seeds I've planted, this was the only to produce multiple shoots, which were divided and each has thus far thrived. I've read Ataulfo aren't supposed to do well in Florida, so we'll see what comes of it. My trees look healthy, at least.

Just this summer:
I got two shoots from a Choc Anon seed and divided them. One is very robust and the other has folded over.

I got two Nam Doc Mai shoots from a seed, divided them, and they are both equally robust.

Of my Pim Seng Mun seedlings, some are bowing down, while others remain robust.

So, can anyone (especially Floridians) share their experience producing fruit from a polyembryonic seedling? And please provide some background . . . What types of mangoes were they? Did you divide up the sprouts or kill off all but one (and was it the most vigorous or the runt)? If you divided them up, which produced the fruit that closely resembled the parent?

Thanks!



 

Ulfr

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Re: Real-world examples of polyembryonic mangoes here?
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2017, 09:25:49 PM »
I use Kensington pride as rootstocks and have a couple in the ground. They sure seem like normal KPs to me. Saying that there must be slight variation though as there are many varieties of KP (I grow Alison red for example).

They always have multiple embryos and when you take the husks off the seeds you can actually separate them out to a degree.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2017, 01:37:07 AM by Ulfr »

AnnonaMangoLord45

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Re: Real-world examples of polyembryonic mangoes here?
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2017, 12:31:55 AM »
My orange sherbert mangoes have produced multiple sprouts, and my sweet tart mango produced about 5 sprouts. when i chucked the seed away, I found multiple degenerated roots from zygotes

Brev Grower

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Re: Real-world examples of polyembryonic mangoes here?
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2017, 10:29:20 AM »
Of your polyembryonic seeds, all sections will be the same as the parent tree(Nucellar) except 1(zygote). Usually, it's about 80% chance you will get the same as the mother tree if only one section sprouts. If more than one sprouts, You do not know for sure which one is the different tree until it fruits. Common practice is to get rid of the "different" sprout if you want to increase your chances of getting the same tree as the original. If you grow 2 sprouts, you are guaranteed to get at least one the same as the mother tree.

Look here: www.scielo.br/pdf/pab/v47n11/47n11a10.pdf

greenman62

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Re: Real-world examples of polyembryonic mangoes here?
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2017, 11:51:18 AM »
I have a seedling growth tree that gave me 1 very tasty fruit.
i cant be sure of the parentage. i was told it was Florigon
but, when i posted it here last year, someone told me it didnt look like Florigon.

I can say, the fruit was good.
Not overly complex, and the flesh to seed ratio wasnt the best
but, it wasnt a bad tasting mango.
I dont think it was over 3 yrs from seed to fruit if i remember right.

Sadly, this Jan we had 1 night of a hard freeze
and it died back to almost the roots.
it is slowly growing back.
One problem i am having, is the limbs extend and bend under thier own weight
2 of them now are laying on the ground


Last year before the frost...







 

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