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Author Topic: Different forms of calcium . . .  (Read 387 times)

Doug

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Different forms of calcium . . .
« on: August 12, 2017, 08:37:02 AM »
I went to the agro for a bag of calcium for my bananas and citrus but they didn't have my usual brand. So, I bought another brand. When I got home I realized I'd bought calcium hydroxide instead of the usual calcium carbonate. I know organic farmers won't usually use cal hydroxide. What is the objection? I'm not a scientist but it seems ultimately calcium is calcium. Have any of you had problems with the hydroxide form?

bsbullie

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Re: Different forms of calcium . . .
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2017, 08:58:57 AM »
If there is a calcium deficiency in your soil I can understand but otherwise, why are you giving your bananas calciun and not potassium?
- Rob

greenman62

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Re: Different forms of calcium . . .
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2017, 11:38:10 AM »
calcium is not all made the same
some forms take longer to react with the soil.
Certain forms should not be used for plants at all.
This type is used sometimes on soils, so its safe as far as that goes.

its normally used to raise the PH
unless you know your soil is acid, i dont see any reason to use it.
adding too much of anything can cause problems.
too much calcium can lockout other minerals (potassium, magnesium, maybe others)
If your soil is acidic, i would read up  on it first...


pineislander

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Re: Different forms of calcium . . .
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2017, 12:54:45 PM »
That is slaked lime usually used by masons to make plaster or whitewash. It is much stronger than the carbonate. You might try it on just one banana tree as a test, roots could be burned, it will change soil pH, the recommendation here is for bare soil, before planting.
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/can-use-hydrated-lime-raise-ph-soil-98544.html

BajaJohn

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Re: Different forms of calcium . . .
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2017, 09:47:20 PM »
Calcium Hydroxide is used on gardens but is about 50% stronger than calcium carbonate. It is somewhat caustic so it is advisable to use gloves, eye protection and a breathing mask when you use it. It is also more soluble in water and therefore quicker acting.
The pH of a calcium hydroxide solution is about 12 compared to a carbonate solution pH of about 9.

Tropicdude

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Re: Different forms of calcium . . .
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2017, 03:42:45 AM »
What about garden gypsum? my understanding is that it does not affect Ph  because of the sulfate in it so it kind of balances the Ph a bit.   my understanding is that it helps with salts, and helps with compact soils,  I use it very sparingly in my container plants.    anyone else use this?
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

Finca La Isla

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Re: Different forms of calcium . . .
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2017, 02:46:13 PM »
Costa Rican soils are generally acidic and the application of calcium is very common.  I don't know about calcium hydroxide, it's a good question, but calcium carbonate is applied at a basic rate of .5kg. Per meter.
My soil ph ranges from 5.8-6.3 which is pretty good for most things.  For avocados and black pepper it can be important.  Coffee and banana growers also use it.
I have had some success treating Jakfruit that tends to have splitting fruit and physiogical problems with mangosteen.
Peter

BajaJohn

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Re: Different forms of calcium . . .
« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2017, 06:09:16 PM »
What about garden gypsum? my understanding is that it does not affect Ph  because of the sulfate in it so it kind of balances the Ph a bit.   my understanding is that it helps with salts, and helps with compact soils,  I use it very sparingly in my container plants.    anyone else use this?
I don't use it but agree with what you said here. It is pretty much neutral pH (7.7). Gypsum can be used to supplement soil calcium and sulphur. It also reduces the effect of excess sodium. I've also seen it mentioned that soil bacteria can use gypsum to produce sulfuric acid and lower pH. It seems a bit strange to me and most discussions of gypsum in gardens suggest it doesn't affect pH. All the same, it may be safe to check pH if you use gypsum.

Doug

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Re: Different forms of calcium . . .
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2017, 08:58:17 AM »
Costa Rican soils are generally acidic and the application of calcium is very common.  I don't know about calcium hydroxide, it's a good question, but calcium carbonate is applied at a basic rate of .5kg. Per meter.
My soil ph ranges from 5.8-6.3 which is pretty good for most things.  For avocados and black pepper it can be important.  Coffee and banana growers also use it.
I have had some success treating Jakfruit that tends to have splitting fruit and physiogical problems with mangosteen.
Peter

Peter, I don't use calcium on any plants other than bananas and citrus, but I read somewhere (maybe here) that some calcium on slow growing seedling sopadillas would be helpful. Of course, at my age everything grows too damn slow, but what do you think? My farm was an old cafetal and the soil was very acid, but I always use "chop and drop" with weeds and grasses, and now the earthworms are abundant. Maybe now the soil is much more balanced.

Finca La Isla

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Re: Different forms of calcium . . .
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2017, 12:12:14 PM »
Hi Doug,
Not sure what you mean by 'very acid'.  In going around this country I run into farms with soil in the high 4ís.  To me this is shockingly high acidity and when I have encouraged calcium applications the results have been positive.  If your ph is in the high 5ís many would consider that acidic but it might be fine for most tropical fruits.  The first exception that comes to mind is avocado.  I wouldn't hesitate to experiment with calcium on sapodilla, it's not going to hurt.
Peter

 

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