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Author Topic: Sprayed with dormant oil when it was hot, but would this be a residual damage?  (Read 105 times)

Mark in Texas

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About 2 mos. ago sprayed my greenhouse citrus with a dormant spray and surfactant.  Had to, had a few branches and fruit covered in scale.  Temps got over 92F.  Noted immediate young tender leaf damage so I water blasted the next day.

Now, most of the new growth has leaf margin cupping, a symptom of moisture stress.  I've been growing citrus for 40 years and this one has me stumped.  No insects noted.






Millet

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I find that quite common this time of the year.  When my trees flush new grow during the summer months, I spray the flush with a horticultural oil solution every 3 or 4 days until the leaves firm up.  If I don't, thrips and other insects quickly begin feeding on the tender growth by sucking out the juices which cause the leaves to become very crinkled.  Once crinkled the remain that way for life.  Your damage looks only in the beginning stage. My in ground trees are also grown inside a large greenhouse. .

Mark in Texas

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I find that quite common this time of the year.  When my trees flush new grow during the summer months, I spray the flush with a horticultural oil solution every 3 or 4 days until the leaves firm up.  If I don't, thrips and other insects quickly begin feeding on the tender growth by sucking out the juices which cause the leaves to become very crinkled.  Once crinkled the remain that way for life.  Your damage looks only in the beginning stage. My in ground trees are also grown inside a large greenhouse. .

Never done this before.  Greenhouse is hot unlike yours.  Just checked and it was at 97F.

Thanks

Millet

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Mark, my greenhouse would always be about 95-F to 110-F on sunny summer days.  I would hose down the floor, and spray water from the hose in the air and on the trees in an effort to cool the greenhouse down some.   After I installed a Wet Wall cooler system it stays at 83-F even on the hottest days.

Mark in Texas

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Mark, my greenhouse would always be about 95-F to 110-F on sunny summer days.  I would hose down the floor, and spray water from the hose in the air and on the trees in an effort to cool the greenhouse down some.   After I installed a Wet Wall cooler system it stays at 83-F even on the hottest days.

Nice!  Yeah, would love a wet wall but I need access for the hundreds of pollinators.  How do you give them access?  I've got quite a few top notch bearing avocado, mango, citrus trees and soon El Bumpo cherimoya. Also pineapples etc. and come spring I have hundreds of every kind of flies, wasp, bee, moth, butterfly doing their biz.

My well water is rock hard, like a TDS of 800+ so a wet wall is out of the question.  Saw one locally but he's feeding his pads with rain water.  Am thinking about installing a high pressure flash nozzle system.  The two Aussie Bonaire swamp coolers suck - not enough pad area and a REAL pita to maintain because of my high bicarbs water.

I too cool down the house/trees by giving them a shower with rainwater and hosing down the walls and benches with well water.





 

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