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Author Topic: Who's the King of Stone Fruits? Plums, Peaches, Pluots, Nectarines, or Cherries  (Read 7541 times)

From the sea

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I think that would blow my wife's mind, thanks again for the info

gunnar429

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thanks I have been thinking about trying out apples here

I'm at 600 ft. elevation, but i've seen Anna apples fruiting even at sea level here, so it's certainly not impossible at your location.

Golden Dorsett was originally found in bahamas.  Anna and ein shemer are also possibilities.  I am growing all 3 plus a red fuji (as I heard you can manipulate the chill hours on apples by removing the leaves in winter to simulate dormancy.  We shall see, as my trees are all really young.  Planning to espalier them so won't take up too much mango space.
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

gnappi

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For me, I love a good Peach. Though I heard the newly introduced Pluots are on a whole nother level of greatness.

I L-O-V-E pluots, but the problem is there are SCADS of varieties and I've rarely seen the same one twice in local markets. I wish I could grow them here in south Florida... I'd chop a mango for the right one.
Regards,

   Gary

Doglips

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One of the local Master Gardeners sales here was selling apricots, I think they may be experimenting on people, like when they sold me fruitless cherry trees.

Bush2Beach

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Oscar what root stock is on your apple? and were did you get it?

Long ago, and i barely remember. It's semi dwarf, i believe M-101 or something like that, probably Dave Wilson nursery.

M 111 is a common rootstock from Dave Wilson

zands

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Golden Dorsett was originally found in bahamas.  Anna and ein shemer are also possibilities.  I am growing all 3 plus a red fuji (as I heard you can manipulate the chill hours on apples by removing the leaves in winter to simulate dormancy.  We shall see, as my trees are all really young.  Planning to espalier them so won't take up too much mango space.


Here are the Chinese removing all mango leaves. Perhaps to stimulate or intensify dormancy. Maybe you get a larger mango harvest  when the tree goes into deeper dormancy
http://www.fairchildgarden.org/Blogs/For-The-Love-Of-Mangos/ArtMID/780/ArticleID/328/Ten-Days-in-China



phantomcrab

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For me it is either peaches or apricots.
Richard

TriangleJohn

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To the person asking about Umeboshi apricots/plums - Many people here in Raleigh NC grow Prunus mume because they are winter bloomers with wonderfully fragrant blossoms. Some people refer to them as apricots and others call them plums (same thing happens with other Prunus species). They grow easily from seed and show very little variation from their parent. The fruit is harsh and astringent and doesn't taste like any other Prunus fruit. I think they would need a bit of cold weather to be happy. In this area you only see them for sale at nurseries this time of year, when they are in full bloom.

Viking Guy

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Not sure how the Double Delight Nectarine didn't get mentioned on some of the lists, but I must say I have yet to taste a stonefruit that beat its full flavor.

I grow extras now as a result, and removed and gave away some other varieties that were only average to me.
-Adam

Yorgos

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Can't beat a ripe peach. It tops a mango, IMHO, if barely.  I've never had a tree ripe apricot or pluot, though.
Near NRG Stadium, Houston Texas. USDA zone 9a

fruitlovers

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Can't beat a ripe peach. It tops a mango, IMHO, if barely.  I've never had a tree ripe apricot or pluot, though.

I've always thought of mangoes as the peach of the tropics. But then again i was exposed to peaches at much earlier age than mangoes.
A tree ripened apricot is really an exquisite fruit. Right up there with the best of peaches in my opinion.
I've only had the pluots from the store, and they are ok, but not all that exciting. But then again most stuff in stores is not that exciting, so not surprising.
I still remember the plum in my backyard when i was a kid. Still have never tasted a plum that came close to that quality. All of these fruits really need tree ripening, ferts, and some TLC, to get to top notch premium taste.
Oscar

gnappi

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For me, I love a good Peach. Though I heard the newly introduced Pluots are on a whole nother level of greatness.
Last summer (2014) was the first time I had a pluot. If they were all as good as the first, they'd rival mango as a top fruit.

Unfortunately since my first I've had enough sub par pluots that I'd not buy another as they're not inexpensive and too variable with so many cultivars out there. When I was a kid, nectarines and plums were my faves, but now every time I buy one, they're tasteless.
That said the old standby is a tree ripened peach.

« Last Edit: March 08, 2015, 07:50:58 AM by gnappi »
Regards,

   Gary

 

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