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Author Topic: Edible "weeds"  (Read 265 times)

LivingParadise

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Edible "weeds"
« on: April 03, 2017, 11:51:03 AM »
A few to add to the list:

Purslane - Portulaca oleracea  (high in Omega 3 fats, very tasty raw)
Sea Purslane (same, but very salty)
Spanish needles - Bidens alba (a godsend for fire ant bites, among other medicinal benefits)
Dollarweed/Pennywort/Gotu kola - Hydrocotyle (astounding health benefits - here are some: https://caloriebee.com/nutrition/Pennywort-Tea-And-Its-Many-Benefits)
Amaranth - Amaranthus (a complete protein, edible leaves AND seeds!)
Sow thistle - Sonchus (popular in many countries, multiple medicinal properties)

So silly that people take so much time out of their lives, and spray poison all over their living spaces, to eradicate such abundant food, much of which has properties that could possibly cure cancer or eradicate many chronic illnesses, and then go to the store and spend a bunch of money on less fresh, less nutritional produce that had to be shipped in from elsewhere.

What is considered a "weed" where you live that is edible (and likely also medicinal), but that people get rid of because of their extreme abundance, and perhaps less than desirable appearance and/or taste? Food is food, and medicine is medicine, and there is no need for humans to go hungry virtually anywhere on Earth, nor to have most of the diseases that exist, if we only knew how to use what is so readily available to us.



And yes, I would be remiss if I did not mention the wealth of information available at http://www.eattheweeds.com/, including in the forums, which in many cases cover plants found throughout the world.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2017, 11:57:16 AM by LivingParadise »

ericalynne

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Re: Edible "weeds"
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2017, 01:09:05 PM »
greenbriar, Smilax, tender growing tips are great. There seems to be many uses for the root, check wikipedia. It grows wild all over the woods in south florida.
Erica

BajaJohn

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Re: Edible "weeds"
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2017, 12:30:01 PM »
Stinging Nettle - Urtica dioica http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-664-stinging%20nettle.aspx?activeingredientid=664

Dandelion - Taraxacum http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/dandelion

A mouthwatering recipe for nettle pudding from the constantly changing pages of Medieval Cookery (http://medievalcookery.com/oddities)
Ingredients
1 bunch of sorrel
1 bunch of watercress
1 bunch of dandelion leaves
2 bunches of young nettle leaves
Some chives
1 cup of barley flour
1 tsp salt
Method
Chop the herbs finely and mix in the barley flour and salt. Add enough water to bind it together and place in the centre of a linen or muslin cloth. Tie the cloth securely and add to a pot of simmering venison or wild boar. Leave in the pot until the meat is cooked and serve with chunks of bread."
« Last Edit: April 08, 2017, 12:41:43 PM by BajaJohn »

TravelingFriend

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Re: Edible "weeds"
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2017, 12:03:37 AM »
How about chicory?! We have a cultivated type, resiliently growing along, flowering and now self sowed after 2 years.
We can make coffee out of the root,
And my main interest is it is a source of inulin based sugar, calorie free, no spike in blood sugar..
And the pushers keep perverting stevia, pumping us with allergens like msg aka maltodextrin.
I grow stevia and it is worth cultivation, for tea, as a dried herb, and baked in snacks, but the stuff in the store is typically synthetically produced steviaside D which is claimed not sustainable to grow the plant for, so they create it in a lab. Steviaside A, steviaside B, and steviaside C get bitter after long storage.

greenman62

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Re: Edible "weeds"
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2017, 10:02:32 AM »
greenbriar, Smilax, tender growing tips are great. There seems to be many uses for the root, check wikipedia. It grows wild all over the woods in south florida.
Erica


i found greenbriar in the woods near my house
i grabbed a small one and planted it in my yard, but its not getting any larger.
i produces an edible berrry, and also young shoots can be eaten.

How about chicory?! We have a cultivated type, resiliently growing along, flowering and now self sowed after 2 years.
We can make coffee out of the root,


chicory leaves are bitter to me.
the roots are already on the coffee i buy, so i dont use it as an edible

but the roots are great for improving the soil.
tall flowers attract bees like crazy too.

ragweed... grows, well... like a weed.
about 20 popped up in my yard. great to attract  bees.
The grain is some 47% crude protein and 38% crude fat.
http://www.eattheweeds.com/ragweed/


Commelina grows wild as a ground cover
http://www.eattheweeds.com/commelina-diffusa-what-a-day-for-a-day-flower-2/


common ragwort
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/r/ragwor02.html

goldenrod grows wild all over South Louisiana (and most gulf states)
its been used as a medicinal for a long time.
makes a good tea, and excellent bee-honey

http://www.eattheweeds.com/solidago-odora-liberty-tea-2/


lambs quarters and pigweed are common
but i dont eat them... too bitter...
i do grow "tree spinach" which is a cousin and in the same family

 "tree spinach"  excellent flavor for a green to eat raw.
Chenopodium giganteum

http://www.eattheweeds.com/chenopodium-album-getting-goosed-2/



Chandramohan

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Re: Edible "weeds"
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2017, 01:01:44 PM »
Sorry, for hijacking the thread, TF, 'msg' is monosodium glutamate,and not maltodextrin. Talking of artificial sweeteners, if you can grow two or three plants of 'Miracle fruit' in a green house, one need never use any sweeteners.

 

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