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Author Topic: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience  (Read 412 times)

DFWCitrus

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Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« on: April 06, 2017, 10:36:37 AM »
Hello, I just joined the forum here, great place and lucky find!

I live in the DFW area and recently transplanted myself from San Diego. I am a citrus nut and just had to have my citrus. After some research I discovered a Texas Satsuma variety originating from Texas A&M called Arctic Frost. It has been shown to have good cold tolerance down to 9-10oF.  Hard to believe. After getting several and planting them end of August last year, they took a bad beating when we had high winds and 16oF. They were covered and had a halogen uplight. Anyway I got complete die back of foliage and limbs, as did my Seto Satsuma I put in the ground. I guess they were still too young to take it?

I have found the Arctic Frost not to be vigorous and very touchy to transplanting. It is not a grafted plant but originally grown from seed and now propagated by cuttings.

Anyone else have experience with an Arctic Frost Satsuma?  I'll later attach a photo of the one Arctic Frost I kept in greenhouse protection this winter.

Larry

DFWCitrus

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2017, 01:10:49 PM »
3 year old Arctic Frost Satsuma. This cultivar thought to be the most cold hardy sweet edible citrus.


Millet

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2017, 02:51:32 PM »
Very nice trees.

vlan1

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2017, 05:43:40 PM »
Lots of people here in central texas bought arctic frost satsumas and orange frost oranges the last few years.

most of them got killed even with protection during the January cold snap when it got down to 20 or under for 2 nights.


Citradia

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2017, 08:03:50 PM »
Try Kimbrough. Mine has done very well with winter protection, even sailing through a night of 19 degrees or lower during an ice storm with no electricity to powerful my space heater in its plastic greenhouse without dropping leaves and fruiting the next year.

DFWCitrus

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2017, 10:43:45 PM »
Thanks. I have not seen Kimbrough for sale in my area of Texas, but I will watch for them. I pulled the Arctic Frosts out and put back into containers as they are damaged almost to the stump and the new growth wilted and died. Hoping my Seto Satsumas will make it through as they are more mature. I just need temps to stay above 18oF this next winter.

Citradia

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2017, 08:28:10 PM »
DFWCitrus, what did you cover the satsumas with? Plastic or frost cloth?  I've been covering my grapefruit and owari and Changsha and Meiwa with 4mil plastic and put small desk-top size space heaters inside the pvc pipe -frame enclosure for the past several years, and these trees survived zero degrees for several nights. I've also lost citranges that I tried to protect with frost cloth. Maybe your trees were not very dormant when the temps in the teens hit. I have a citradia citrange that did good with a low of 7 degrees this winter, but after a warm February, it started budding out, and when I got two nights of 14 degrees, the new growth died and it lost entire branches. We have to protect more when trees not dormant.

DFWCitrus

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2017, 09:34:50 PM »
DFWCitrus, what did you cover the satsumas with? Plastic or frost cloth?  I've been covering my grapefruit and owari and Changsha and Meiwa with 4mil plastic and put small desk-top size space heaters inside the pvc pipe -frame enclosure for the past several years, and these trees survived zero degrees for several nights. I've also lost citranges that I tried to protect with frost cloth. Maybe your trees were not very dormant when the temps in the teens hit. I have a citradia citrange that did good with a low of 7 degrees this winter, but after a warm February, it started budding out, and when I got two nights of 14 degrees, the new growth died and it lost entire branches. We have to protect more when trees not dormant.
I had purchased frost cloth but it was terrible. The problem was I did not adequately cover them. This year I will either buy or make a framed plastic covering for each in the ground citrus until they are more mature. Planting late in the season didn't help. I was hoping for another mild winter ;)

manfromyard

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2017, 09:03:05 AM »
I had one some years ago. Totally wimped out on me. It wasn't even close to the low that they said it could endure. It was up against a south wall and with protection. Just for comparison, my yuzuquat and meyer lemon that were in the same situation are still alive.

Maybe the name should be changed to Temperate Chill......

Totally false advertising on this variety, and it doesn't appear to come back from the trunk or roots after taking damage, unlike most citrus...

GregW

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2017, 06:45:02 PM »


I have found the Arctic Frost not to be vigorous and very touchy to transplanting. It is not a grafted plant but originally grown from seed and now propagated by cuttings.

Anyone else have experience with an Arctic Frost Satsuma?  I'll later attach a photo of the one Arctic Frost I kept in greenhouse protection this winter.

Larry
[/quote]

I have a couple of Arctic Frost and I don't consider them to be a vigorous grower either. My trees are in their second summer. I got them pretty late in the season last year. I have them planted in air pots.

Hopefully they will have a good growing season this year.

Citradia

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2017, 06:54:09 PM »
I saw arctic frost satsumas for sale in the greenhouse of an Asheville, NC nursery, and they were covered in small thorns; my other sats don't have thorns. Is this because the arctic frosts are cuttings from seedlings instead of more mature wood, or just thorny nature of this variety?

Ilya11

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2017, 04:41:58 AM »
Arctic Frost is not a pure satsuma, it's Satsuma x Changsha hybrid and it does have small thorns.
Best regards,
                       Ilya

Millet

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2017, 11:15:57 AM »
The history of the Arctic Frost hybrid satsuma, a Texas super star,---  who developed it and how it was developed.

https://today.agrilife.org/2015/06/10/arctic-frost-satsuma-mandarin-hybrid-named-new-texas-superstar/

SoCal2warm

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2017, 11:31:38 PM »
The surrounding Dallas area (including Southlake) is in climate zone 7, with central Dallas falling into zone 8a. Or that's how it's used to be. Within the last 10 years winter lows haven't gone down as cold as they used to and the entire region has moved into zone 8a.

I guess if you get desperate enough there's the "Ten Degree Mandarin" but it has seeds.
It would really help if you used shade cloth and kept the mandarins well watered during the hot summers, because the temperatures can get very high where you are. (A little thing some people may not realize is that mandarins do not do as well with these very high temperatures as other citrus)

Young citrus trees are more vulnerable to winter chill than more mature citrus trees. A 3-year-old tree might still be just a little young to put outside in zone 7 or 8.

 
« Last Edit: May 20, 2017, 12:08:48 AM by SoCal2warm »

Gsmeyer

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2017, 07:27:13 PM »
I recently took a patio citrus at the Fort Worth botanical garden. There is a lemon which will grow here without protection. It is the Ichang lemon.   The classes instructor had an ichang growing in his yard unprotected for years.   They are hard to find though.

Millet

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2017, 09:06:24 PM »
You can purchase Ichang Lemons from Stan McKenzie at http://mckenzie-farms.com/

 

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