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Author Topic: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7  (Read 78880 times)

LEOOEL

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Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« on: March 29, 2013, 03:00:37 AM »
I've been trying for some years now to find mango and avocado cultivars, so that I'll have ripe fruit of either/both species year round. And now, I think I've found a way.

The tricky months in my Zone 10b, when there are no mangos or avocados, are somewhat fuzzy to say for sure. Based on my observations, they are either January to April, or March to April. I guess the weather plays a lot into it.

Ok, here it is.

Mangos:

I've been eating Rosy-Gold mangos sine March 1, 2013. I'm trying to fnd out if I fertilize, say in November, whether I can start eating mangos next February, we'll see.

Avocados:

I went to the Fruit & Spice Park on March 1, 2013, to check out the different varieties of avocado trees.

Only the Lula avocado tree variety had any, and it was just about full of them. Considering, that the tree size looked to me like a medium sized young tree, of about 20 feet tall.
About half the avocado fruit exibited a 70% green color, with the remaining 30% of the fruit exibiting a somewhat brownish/callus coloration. I suspect this had to do with the cold temperatures of the winter season.
The other half of the avocado fruit was about 40% green and 60% brownish/callus coloration.

To the touch, all the fruit felt super hard. As if they had been somehow mummified by the cold temperatures and rendered unedible. Although, on the ground, under the tree, there was half of an avocado that had obviously just been split open. The flesh looked green, even colored, and for a split second I was tempted to taste it, but of course, no way.

I went again to the Park on March 23, to check on the Lula avocado tree. This time, it only had one avocado left on the tree.
There was a Park employee nearby and I was lucky enough that I was allowed to pick this last Lula avocado from the tree. It was very hard to the touch. I took it home to let it ripen and soften.
Yesterday, March 27, 2013, it was soft and I ate it, and also shared it. I couldn't believe I was eating an avocado that I picked from a tree, at this time of year.

Well, I would have preferred the seed to be a little smaller, in relation to the rest of the size of the fruit.
About the  thickness of the flesh, well, I would have preferred it to have been thicker, in relation to the rest of the size of the fruit.
The color, again, I would have preferred it to be greener.
The size, larger than a Hass avocado, I would say medium sized.
And, the taste, although I liked it, I think regular season avocado probably tastes somewhat better.

But I must say, taking into consideration that I was eating an avocado that was just picked off a tree, way out of season, believe me, I was a happy camper and any complaints were the furthest thing from my mind.

Well, there you have it. I've found an avocado cultivar, Lula, that crossess into the mango season, with the Rosy-Gold mango cultivar.
Therefore, the goal of 'Mango OR Avocado, 24/7' is then accomplished.

Nevertheless, I think there has to be a higher quality avocado cultivar that could replace the Lula variety in this effort.
Possibly an avocado cultivar from California. In California they really have avocados year round. I don't see why the same thing cannot be accomplished in South Florida, USA.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2014, 08:32:37 PM by LEOOEL »
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2013, 06:52:57 AM »
 ::)
- Rob

bradflorida

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2013, 07:22:17 AM »
The University of Florida, in its publication "Avocado growing in the Florida home landscape", lists the Kampong variety as producing fruit from Dec 1 to March 31.  I don't have any firsthand knowledge of this though.

Brad
Brad

bradflorida

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2013, 07:35:26 AM »
What about the avocados that I see now in the supermarket, from the Dominican Republic?  Perhaps you could find out the variety name, and see if it would grow here in Florida also.

Brad
Brad

digigarden

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2013, 07:57:15 AM »
What about the avocados that I see now in the supermarket, from the Dominican Republic?  Perhaps you could find out the variety name, and see if it would grow here in Florida also.

Brad

probably semil34

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2013, 11:52:33 PM »
Thank you for the suggestions people on the two late season avocado cultivars "Kampong" and "Semil34." It's much appreciated. I have heard of the variety Semil34, but not of Kampong.  I'll look into both of them.

I only have one spot on my yard to plant one tree, of this latest in the season avocado that I'm looking for, so I have to choose right.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

johnb51

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2013, 11:55:09 PM »
Carlos is also busy looking for an avocado to fill that void.
John

Tropicdude

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2013, 02:34:23 AM »
The Dominican Avocado that may fill that spot is a variety called Carla, which is a "new" good quality variety.  I have been trying to get my hands on one, so that I can get a scion to Carlos, that way he can evaluate it in S. Fla.
William
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CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2013, 04:21:05 PM »
I think is a matter of time before we get avocado year around. Some of the Hawaiians and some of the Guatemalans and even some Californians have good probabilities we will know more in a couple of years. I think by now I have them all growing at one stage or another.

The Dominican Republic has something we don't have. Elevations, there are high mountains where I believe they are growing the Semil 34 and Carla that is why they have then now. Plus they are playing a cold storage game in the tree and off the tree. I had a Carla last week that had 5-6 inches of roots around the seed, that was not so good.  I had another Carla that was perfect, great avocado, ate it with a spoon no seasoning. If you bring those to Florida they will be a lot earlier here than at 2-3 K feet elevation in DR.

In Florida we have a couple of avocados that are in season now, both patented cultivated by commercial growers. The latest, the Buck and the Wheeling both decent fruit. 
I'm kind of hoping for trees that flower late in Florida and the fruit hangs 10-12 months in the tree.  Some of the Guatemalan hybrids can do that.
The big gap is April, May and early June.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2013, 07:14:57 PM by CTMIAMI »
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2013, 07:13:52 PM »
I think is a matter of time before we get avocado year around. Some of the Hawaiians and some of the Guatemalans and even some Californians have good probabilities we will know more in a couple of years. I think by now I have them all growing at one stage or another.

The Dominican Republic has something we don't have. Elevations, there are high mountains where I believe they are growing the Semil 34 and Carla that is why they have then now. Plus they are playing a cold storage game in the tree and off the tree. I had a Carla last week that had 5-6 inches of roots around the seed, that was not so good.  I had another Carla that was perfect, great avocado, ate it with a spoon no seasoning. If you bring those to Florida they will be a lot earlier here than at 2-3 K feet elevation in DR.

In Florida we have a couple of avocados that are in season now, both patented cultivated by commercial growers. The latest, the Buck and the Wheeling both decent fruit. 
I'm kind of hoping for trees that flower late in Florida and the fruit hangs 10-12 months in the tree.  Some of the Guatemalan hybrids can do that.
The big gap is April, May and early June.
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2013, 07:30:19 PM »
The University of Florida, in its publication "Avocado growing in the Florida home landscape", lists the Kampong variety as producing fruit from Dec 1 to March 31.  I don't have any firsthand knowledge of this though.

Brad
The Kampong is at the Fairchild Williams Farm collection. I will pass by this week to see if its holding fruit.
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2013, 10:00:09 AM »
Carlos, your're right, you hit the nail on the head, "the big gap is April, May and early June."

And the big question is, what quality avocado cultivar(s) can fill this gap.

That's a great idea, going to Fairchilds Williams Farm to see if any avocado trees are holding fruit. Now is a great time of the year to make some Progress on this yearly avocado void, that we have here in South Florida.

Like you said, it's just a matter of time before the solution to this problem is figured out. And, the quicker the better.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2013, 04:56:32 PM »
I'm very encouraged with what I'm growing.
I know Mexicola is not a quality fruit but it will ripen in the middle of May in So. Florida. I should have about 20-30 fruit this year.  If you consider the Mexicola worth eating there is fruit in early May. This was an unexpected surprise Mexicola ripening in less than 5 months. This is why I don't pay attention to maturity dates form other locations.
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

JF

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2013, 05:17:32 PM »
I'm very encouraged with what I'm growing.
I know Mexicola is not a quality fruit but it will ripen in the middle of May in So. Florida. I should have about 20-30 fruit this year.  If you consider the Mexicola worth eating there is fruit in early May. This was an unexpected surprise Mexicola ripening in less than 5 months. This is why I don't pay attention to maturity dates form other locations.

Hi Carlos, those the mexicola hold more promise than the rest of the avocado you are experimenting with?

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2013, 07:29:12 PM »
I'm very encouraged with what I'm growing.
I know Mexicola is not a quality fruit but it will ripen in the middle of May in So. Florida. I should have about 20-30 fruit this year.  If you consider the Mexicola worth eating there is fruit in early May. This was an unexpected surprise Mexicola ripening in less than 5 months. This is why I don't pay attention to maturity dates form other locations.

Hi Carlos, those the mexicola hold more promise than the rest of the avocado you are experimenting with?
Mexicola as far as I know it matures in mid May. In reality I'm more hopeful on some of the other I have to be better quality fruit, except we have no idea about maturity dates.
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

JF

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2013, 09:14:19 PM »
I'm very encouraged with what I'm growing.
I know Mexicola is not a quality fruit but it will ripen in the middle of May in So. Florida. I should have about 20-30 fruit this year.  If you consider the Mexicola worth eating there is fruit in early May. This was an unexpected surprise Mexicola ripening in less than 5 months. This is why I don't pay attention to maturity dates form other locations.

Hi Carlos, those the mexicola hold more promise than the rest of the avocado you are experimenting with?
Mexicola as far as I know it matures in mid May. In reality I'm more hopeful on some of the other I have to be better quality fruit, except we have no idea about maturity dates.

In early summer here. ...rootstock material.

fruitlovers

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2013, 05:46:15 PM »
Elevation helps in having year round avocados, but i don't believe it's crucial if you have enough different cultivars planted. Here we have year round avocados i believe based on both situations.
Oscar

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #17 on: April 01, 2013, 11:54:14 PM »
Ok Oscar, rub it in.  ;D  ;)  :)
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

fruitlovers

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2013, 12:03:28 AM »
Ok Oscar, rub it in.  ;D  ;)  :)

Not trying to rub it in, on contrary telling you it's totally doable, even without any elevation.
Oscar

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2013, 12:25:43 AM »
Ok, thank you for the motivation.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

fruitlovers

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2013, 12:41:39 AM »
Ok, thank you for the motivation.

Yes that's what it was, motivation and hope.  :) I guess i didn't make myself clear. What i was meaning is: keep trying, because that goal is definitely achievable.
Oscar

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2013, 08:36:01 AM »
We are trying and we will succeed is only a matter of time.
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

fruitlovers

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2013, 06:03:33 PM »
We are trying and we will succeed is only a matter of time.

I'm sure you're right! Florida will be a lot more liveable place then. Let me know. I can't live without my daily avocados.  ;D :-*
Oscar

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2013, 02:10:20 AM »
Unfortunately, I just can't wait two (2) years, to decide which quality avocado variety I will choose, to fill that yearly avocado/mango-void. I have to choose the avocado-tree-variety sometime this year, before the Summer Season ends.

The months where there are no mangos or avocados in my yard are: Part of December, January, February and part of March (my Rosy-Gold mango tree had ripe fruit since March 1).

The best I've been able to come up with, for my yearly avocado-void, is the Lula avocado tree variety. I picked the last avocado fruit off a Lula tree on March 23, 2013. That is the latest date that I've ever heard (or seen) an avocado variety holding its fruit. It wasn't hedious at all, but I know that the quality could be better in another cultivar, that has yet to be discovered.

If I do end up choosing the Lula avocado tree variety, I wonder how big will the tree get. I would prefer it to be really big, so that it serves a second purpose, that of covering some unsightly power lines.

The ideal situation would be, to find a quality avocado variety with ripe fruit from January to May. Now that would fill just about everyone's yearly avocado-void, in my Zone-10b.

I had concidered the Choquette avocado variety, but was informed that it was hedious, so I ruled it out.

This is some interesting information that I've been able to gather, on the Lula avocado tree:

Fruit pear-shaped, sometimes with a neck, medium-large. Skin almost smooth. Flesh pale to greenish-yellow. Oil content 12-16%. Seed large, tight. Also, great as rootstock. Season medium-late (November-December). Tree is tall, bears early and heavily. Cold-resistant, successful in Central and South Florida where it is a formerly the leading commercial cultivar. More frost resistant than most. It is renowned for its ability to endure harsh winters, and for its exceptionally long harvesting period. This makes Lula an exceptional choice for homeowners in and around Orlando. Originated from seed from parent tree planted 1915 by Mrs. Lula Cellon at Miami, Florida.

I haven't made my final decision yet, but I get the feeling, that the Lula avocado tree is going to be the one I'll end up choosing; wow, this variety has been around since 1915!
« Last Edit: April 04, 2013, 02:25:09 AM by LEOOEL »
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2013, 05:54:10 PM »
A men most have what he needs.
If something better develops down the road you can always top work it. Lula makes a good root stock.
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

 

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