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Author Topic: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7  (Read 78828 times)

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #25 on: April 06, 2013, 01:52:29 AM »
Good way to put it. Good suggestion. And, good point.

Love your videos Carlos, very educational. Please keep up the good work.
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CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #26 on: April 06, 2013, 08:36:06 AM »
FYI I dont grow Lulas but know pleople that do and they tell me is very suseptible to desease and it needs extra spraying. In a home environment may no mean much if you can spray it a few times a season.
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #27 on: April 06, 2013, 11:20:14 PM »
Carlos, is there a better quality avocado than Lula, that will hold fruit until March 23, 2013, or longer? As I've mentioned, I picked the last fruit off a Lula tree on this date, this year.

I'm looking to have the mango and avocado season, criss-cross one another. This way I can have mango and/or avocado year round.

What I liked about the Lula is that it helps me criss-cross into the mango season. Like I said, I've been eating Rosy-Gold mangos since March 1, 2013.

But now, after you've mentioned that Lula is susceptible to disease, I'm just not so sure about this variety.

When I was observing the Lula avocado fruit hanging on the tree, between March 1, and March 23, 2013, I noticed that about two-thirds, or more, of the hanging fruit, had brownish spots over 60% of the fruit. All the fruits felt hard like a rock to the touch. I thoght all this was due to the cold weather, and maybe it was. But, now that you've mention disease susceptibility, I'm not so sure.

Man, I thought my search was over. I thought all I had to deal with was, that the seed was slightly large.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #28 on: April 07, 2013, 12:55:06 PM »
As long as you keep the tree small like under 15 ft and you have a sprayer that can reach the top, It would work for you until there is something better to plant. 
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #29 on: April 09, 2013, 03:42:10 AM »
So Lula is susceptible to scab disease. Now it clicks. I saw it with my own eyes. They looked somewhat unsightly. On March 1, 2013, the tree was still, unbelievably, pretty much full of them. You could see a good deal of scab on pretty much all of them. On March 23, 2013, it only had one left on the tree. Althoug with scab, in perfect edible codition.

Because of the scab disease issue, I very much dislike to have to spray it, or keep it at a height of 15'. Therefore, the Lula is out of my consideration; I wonder if using another type of rootstock on the Lula will have any effect on the scab disease situation.

Carlos, after researching yours and others posts on this TFF, I've also ruled out of my consideration the 'Oro-Negro' variety. Great taste but disease issue also.

All this leads me back to Monroe avocado variety. Just moderately susceptible to disease, large size and productive. A quality avocado, though not as great in taste (or for guacamole) as 'Oro Negro.' And, based from what I've been able to gather from first hand observation, it looks like the Lula will hold fruit longer than Monroe. Although, several scientific reports on the net, say that Lula and Monroe hold fruit for the same length/period of time.

So, at least for the time being, Monroe is back to the top of my list. Carlos, you, Rob and others have been really helpful in this search. Thank you. Unless anything changes, it looks like I'll be pruchasing a grafted Monroe avocado tree sometime this summer. If it still leaves me with an avocado/mango void, I think it's only for approximately 15 days or so. I can live with that, until that new, super-duper, void-filling variety shows up, that is.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

ofdsurfer

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #30 on: April 09, 2013, 07:41:52 AM »
Leooel,

Take a two week vacation to the tropics during your "void" time.  ;)

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #31 on: April 09, 2013, 04:03:43 PM »
So Lula is susceptible to scab disease. Now it clicks. I saw it with my own eyes. They looked somewhat unsightly. On March 1, 2013, the tree was still, unbelievably, pretty much full of them. You could see a good deal of scab on pretty much all of them. On March 23, 2013, it only had one left on the tree. Althoug with scab, in perfect edible codition.

Because of the scab disease issue, I very much dislike to have to spray it, or keep it at a height of 15'. Therefore, the Lula is out of my consideration; I wonder if using another type of rootstock on the Lula will have any effect on the scab disease situation.

Carlos, after researching yours and others posts on this TFF, I've also ruled out of my consideration the 'Oro-Negro' variety. Great taste but disease issue also.

All this leads me back to Monroe avocado variety. Just moderately susceptible to disease, large size and productive. A quality avocado, though not as great in taste (or for guacamole) as 'Oro Negro.' And, based from what I've been able to gather from first hand observation, it looks like the Lula will hold fruit longer than Monroe. Although, several scientific reports on the net, say that Lula and Monroe hold fruit for the same length/period of time.

So, at least for the time being, Monroe is back to the top of my list. Carlos, you, Rob and others have been really helpful in this search. Thank you. Unless anything changes, it looks like I'll be pruchasing a grafted Monroe avocado tree sometime this summer. If it still leaves me with an avocado/mango void, I think it's only for approximately 15 days or so. I can live with that, until that new, super-duper, void-filling variety shows up, that is.
Loodel, that is not to say that Monroe is without original sin. It too has its issues, most late fruit in a summer like we had last year will need some spray. If you want late avocados budget in an sprayer. It is less susceptible than Lula but is not disease free.  If you get a wet summer you will probably have to spray. How ever it produces well, a tree kept at 20 feet will produce all you could eat,  sets fruit well and it is one of our best tasting avocados we have.
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #32 on: April 10, 2013, 01:23:19 AM »
I realize there's no perfect avocado that is similar to a Keitt mango (almost perfect), specially a late season avocado. But, I'm a lazy gardener. I mostly just like to apply fertilizer, let the tree get as big as it can, and eat the yummy fruit. With this Monroe avocado variety, "I think this may just be the beginning of a beautiful friendship" (couldn't resist). As far as quality and being one of the latest avocados of the season, it looks like Monroe is the way to go.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

jc

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #33 on: April 10, 2013, 06:06:24 PM »
What are you spraying to prevent/treat avocado scab?

FYI I dont grow Lulas but know pleople that do and they tell me is very suseptible to desease and it needs extra spraying. In a home environment may no mean much if you can spray it a few times a season.
JC

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #34 on: April 11, 2013, 04:06:09 PM »
Good old copper
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

johnb51

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2013, 04:53:35 PM »
Good old copper

Is copper considered neutral and not a harmful pesticide, as far as effects on human health go?
John

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2013, 07:14:30 PM »
As far as I'm concerned is safe. Don't pay attention to everything you read. Do your own research and test,  then draw you conclusions.
I test my soil regularly every 5-6 year. I use Cooper 2-3 times a year in 2005 the copper levels in my soil were medium (Normal) in 2011 also medium. My fruit test in 2011 showed no pesticides or fungicides detected in the fruit. I'm nor required to do these test but I do them because my family eats what I grow.
If you apply according to label I feel I'm OK. If you are going to be out there spraying every week then you may be asking for it.  I think there is some use allowed of Copper in organic farming.

 These is a lot of panic out there and people repeating what they read in a web page or an article. The fact is that in a wet summer like we had last year if you don't spray you get a lot of disease probably worst than copper.

« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 10:22:02 PM by CTMIAMI »
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

jc

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #37 on: April 11, 2013, 09:25:30 PM »
JC

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #38 on: April 13, 2013, 02:06:40 AM »
I think is a matter of time before we get avocado year around. Some of the Hawaiians and some of the Guatemalans and even some Californians have good probabilities we will know more in a couple of years. I think by now I have them all growing at one stage or another.

The Dominican Republic has something we don't have. Elevations, there are high mountains where I believe they are growing the Semil 34 and Carla that is why they have then now. Plus they are playing a cold storage game in the tree and off the tree. I had a Carla last week that had 5-6 inches of roots around the seed, that was not so good.  I had another Carla that was perfect, great avocado, ate it with a spoon no seasoning. If you bring those to Florida they will be a lot earlier here than at 2-3 K feet elevation in DR.

In Florida we have a couple of avocados that are in season now, both patented cultivated by commercial growers. The latest, the Buck and the Wheeling both decent fruit. 
I'm kind of hoping for trees that flower late in Florida and the fruit hangs 10-12 months in the tree.  Some of the Guatemalan hybrids can do that.
The big gap is April, May and early June.

Carlos, while I was looking into the avocado variety you metioned, the "Buck-3" variety, that in turn led me to the "April" avocado variety.

Can you please share your opinion of the "Buck-3" (susceptiblity to disease?) and "April" avocado varieties?

Are the "Buck-3" and "April" available for purchase? If so where? Thank you for your help.

Buck-3: Fruit matures from the end of March through mid-May. Fine eating quality with non-fibrous flesh. Fruit quality is excellent with buttery, smooth flesh with an excellent nutty flavor. Fruit size is Medium to Large. Consistency -- smooth and buttery without fibers. The Buck 3 avocado tree bears every year but one year has a very heavy crop and the other a lighter crop.

April: The fruit matures and can be picked from December to April. This avocado hangs on the tree until the end of March and the beginning of April. Cultivar differs from other known Florida varieties in that some fruits remain on the tree until March and April, with a picking season from December to April. Tree: Very large, very broad and very tall. The growth pattern is intermediate or spreading. It was originally a seedling. The canopy is densely foliated. Plant resistance/susceptibility: The leaves and fruit show a high degree of tolerance to diseases. Fruit size: Medium to Medium-Large. No disease spots despite lack of fungicidal sprays were observed. There are no fibers in the pulp. Pulp consistency is smooth and buttery. Quality: Quality is excellent. The flesh was buttery, smooth, with an excellent nutty flavor. Pulp oil content is unknown. The tree bears every year but one year has a very heavy crop and the other a lighter crop. The tree receives minimal care. No minor element sprays, iron drenches and only a small amount of dry fertilizer were being applied regularly. Comments: Because of the outstanding and unique horticultural characters, especially its very late season, this cultivar should be planted in a grove setting for further evaluation. This cultivar should command excellent prices due to its late harvest season.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2013, 02:10:55 AM by LEOOEL »
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CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #39 on: April 13, 2013, 12:16:43 PM »
This is what I know:
April is a patented variety. I know of the owner of the patent and for some reason he is not sharing bud wood or issuing licenses to reproduce or grow. I also understand is more of a March fruit and from what I been told is not consistent. Don't know about disease.  I suspect is not as good as the patent papers describes.
Buck also patented. I did taste the fruit I got two pcs from a commercial grower that is growing then now under agreement or owns the patent now, not sure. The trees looked good after a wet summer so I have to assume it is decent in the disease department. He did probably sprayed a few times. The fruit is excellent. 
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #40 on: April 13, 2013, 10:59:05 PM »
I'm pretty much sold on the "Monroe" avocado variety. It'll cover the December through February avocado period.

With the "Buck-3" avocado variety, I would just have an, acceptable, avocado-void of about 3 weeks, in the month of March.
Now if I only could somehow obtain the "Buck-3," whether by bud-wood sharing (how much?), issuing a license (how much?) or by any other appropriate means.
I just need one "Buck-3" tree for my yard. It's not for any commercial purposes. I'm perfectly willing to abide by any agreement, such as not sharing or selling the fruit.

I've already allocated two locations in my yard. One for the "Monroe", and one for the "Buck-3."  :-X

Leo
« Last Edit: April 14, 2013, 03:10:54 AM by LEOOEL »
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CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #41 on: April 13, 2013, 11:31:41 PM »
My suggestion:  plant the Monroe and let's see where the Buck heads. I have the feeling that is not going to be available to homeowners any time soon. Also I hear there is a Lula Choquette hybrid out there no idea as to maturity dates but it sure could be an interesting late variety, have not seen it just heard is out there.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2013, 11:34:16 PM by CTMIAMI »
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #42 on: April 14, 2013, 03:30:12 AM »
Wow, interesting, amazing, I'm impressed. I wonder about what are the quality specifications on this new Lula-Choquette-Hybrid variety. And, if the process of observing it in the field is completed, or if it's another patent. The idea is brilliant and it sounds like they know what they are-trying-to/have accomplish(ed). 

Tell me if I'm wrong, but, this, this is a list!: Buck-3, Lula-Choquette-Hybrid, April and who knows what other new late-season/winter varieties are out there. Thanks for pointing in the right direction.

I just wish the people who own these fruit tree cultivars, would allow them to be purchased and just state their conditions; i.e. the tree and its fruit cannot be propagated or sold, etc. If there is a demand for theses fruit trees, why not supply that demand? Time is passing, and there will be other, better, avocado varieties coming (from California?), that could render these present/current varieties obsolete.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2013, 10:27:51 PM by LEOOEL »
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LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #43 on: May 11, 2013, 03:42:33 AM »
I finally got a grafted Monroe avocado last Saturday at Excalibur Nursery. Rob was very helpful and accomodating with my tree pickup, after I got out of work, which I much appreciate. The tree is already planted and doing great.

I started this thread to fill the quality avocado/mango void for the months of December-February and avocado void for March-June in the Zone 10 where I am at.
Well, with this Monroe avocado I think I've solved the months of December-February.

I hope that finding a quality avocado cultivar(s) that ripen(s) in the months of March-June, is not far off. The help provided to this endeavor by Carlos, Rob and other members of this forum is greatly appreciated. I'm really interested in finding this quality avocado cultivar(s) this year, God willing, so that I can plant it and let it begin to grow.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

zands

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #44 on: May 11, 2013, 05:57:56 AM »
I finally got a grafted Monroe avocado last Saturday at Excalibur Nursery. Rob was very helpful and accomodating with my tree pickup, after I got out of work, which I much appreciate. The tree is already planted and doing great.

I started this thread to fill the quality avocado/mango void for the months of December-February and avocado void for March-June in the Zone 10 where I am at.
Well, with this Monroe avocado I think I've solved the months of December-February.

I hope that finding a quality avocado cultivar(s) that ripen(s) in the months of March-June, is not far off. The help provided to this endeavor by Carlos, Rob and other members of this forum is greatly appreciated. I'm really interested in finding this quality avocado cultivar(s) this year, God willing, so that I can plant it and let it begin to grow.

Rob (bsbullie) is only there on Saturdays. Rob was very helpful to me and the crew I brought along last year when I bought a Coc mango (Vietnam origin) there which is coming along great so thanks Rob and Excalibur!
Monroe avocado is one I never thought of until Carlos mentioned it frequently. I saw one at Home Depot 4 months ago and planted it right away. It is doing very well while my Brogdon and Lula are in suspended animation

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #45 on: May 11, 2013, 08:11:20 AM »
As far as I'm concerned is safe. Don't pay attention to everything you read. Do your own research and test,  then draw you conclusions.
I test my soil regularly every 5-6 year. I use Cooper 2-3 times a year in 2005 the copper levels in my soil were medium (Normal) in 2011 also medium. My fruit test in 2011 showed no pesticides or fungicides detected in the fruit. I'm nor required to do these test but I do them because my family eats what I grow.
If you apply according to label I feel I'm OK. If you are going to be out there spraying every week then you may be asking for it.  I think there is some use allowed of Copper in organic farming.

 There is a lot of panic out there and people repeating what they read in a web page or an article. The fact is that in a wet summer like we had last year if you don't spray you get a lot of disease probably worst than copper.

Yep, if someone on the internet says it and it's repeated, then it must be true.

Thank you for those words of wisdom, and rational thoughts.

Kocide is effective and been used for ages.

Mark   

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #46 on: May 11, 2013, 01:41:00 PM »
Leooel Monroes will set a lot of fruit when small. I dont know if your tree has any if it does i would suggest you remove it all.
In the first few years that you ferlilize the tree  the fruit will drop by early January, then in two three years reduce the fertilizer to one small application low in nitrogen, some people dont fertilize at all and then the fruit stays on the tree longer.
Its one of the best avocados we have
Carlos
www.myavocadotrees.com
zone 10a Miami-Dade County

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #47 on: May 11, 2013, 10:33:45 PM »
Carlos, the Monroe avocado tree is still small, so no avocados yet, but I'll follow your recommendations to the letter, thank you for giving them.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #48 on: May 11, 2013, 10:44:12 PM »
I finally got a grafted Monroe avocado last Saturday at Excalibur Nursery. Rob was very helpful and accomodating with my tree pickup, after I got out of work, which I much appreciate. The tree is already planted and doing great.

I started this thread to fill the quality avocado/mango void for the months of December-February and avocado void for March-June in the Zone 10 where I am at.
Well, with this Monroe avocado I think I've solved the months of December-February.

I hope that finding a quality avocado cultivar(s) that ripen(s) in the months of March-June, is not far off. The help provided to this endeavor by Carlos, Rob and other members of this forum is greatly appreciated. I'm really interested in finding this quality avocado cultivar(s) this year, God willing, so that I can plant it and let it begin to grow.

Rob (bsbullie) is only there on Saturdays. Rob was very helpful to me and the crew I brought along last year when I bought a Coc mango (Vietnam origin) there which is coming along great so thanks Rob and Excalibur!
Monroe avocado is one I never thought of until Carlos mentioned it frequently. I saw one at Home Depot 4 months ago and planted it right away. It is doing very well while my Brogdon and Lula are in suspended animation

Sounds to me like what you've got there is a a future avocado heaven. I also sometimes spend hours researching a cultivar's specifications before I purchase.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 02:35:17 PM by LEOOEL »
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LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #49 on: May 27, 2013, 03:55:16 PM »
Carlos, or Oscar, or anyone else, what's your opinion on the Yamagata avocado cultivar being offereded at Top Tropicals? Do fruit really begin to ripen in April or May? How is the fruit production and is it reliable year after year? Help, please.

These are the specifications offered on their website:

Name of variety: Yamagata
Ripening Season: very early March-July
Plant size: vigorous and upright, dark green foliage
Production: ?   
Fruit Shape / SizeA: large, oval-pyriform with a curved neck
fruit color: green
Cold tolerance: Medium to low
Comments: Yamagata variety is very early. It ripens in Florida in March-April when no other varieties produce fruit. Can ripen over a long season, from March through July. Fruit is large, with a small seed and green skin. Flesh green, smooth, flavor nutty. It's a very fine, gourmet Hawaiian avocado named for agriculture specialist Heiji Yamagata, who develeoped it. According to University of Hawaii consumer poll, Yamagata was selected as one of the best Hawaiian cultivars. Medium to low cold hardiness. Very vigorous and upright growing tree.
Type: West Indian
Place of Origin: Hawaii
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

 

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