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Messages - Squam256

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: ID this mango?
« on: December 13, 2017, 09:00:18 PM »
Probably Glenn. Florida Mangos sometimes come out shaped a little differently in California. I’ve seen Glenn shaped that way in Florida before too even though it typically looks different.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sweet tart mango fruiting already
« on: December 08, 2017, 07:44:54 AM »
That's great news, thank you!  I was thinking ST was more of a mid summer fruit.

Normally yes, but fruit set from November bloom will invariably mature earlier.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New acquisition
« on: December 07, 2017, 03:10:15 PM »
Oh snap Dan. Looks like you’ve been had. Who sold you this “Mamey”?

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango blooming now.
« on: December 07, 2017, 03:08:43 PM »
10-14 nights below 60F would be more ideal, but for most areas this should be enough to ignite some significant bloom. Some cultivars might still need more of a nudge though.

Alex,

Which cultivars bloom the most consistent for you with out the cold weather stimulus?

Edward, Rosigold, Dwarf Hawaiian, Rosa, Florigon, Julie, Jean Ellen, Nam Doc Mai

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New acquisition
« on: December 07, 2017, 09:56:04 AM »
Nothing wrong with planting a Mamey. Nice choice Dan.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango blooming now.
« on: December 07, 2017, 09:42:29 AM »
10-14 nights below 60F would be more ideal, but for most areas this should be enough to ignite some significant bloom. Some cultivars might still need more of a nudge though.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sweet tart mango fruiting already
« on: December 05, 2017, 10:46:08 PM »
Just thought I'd try one more time to see if anybody had thoughts on when I can expect to see ripe fruit considering blooming in late November.

April/May.

8
Those who live in central Florida may have better yields than those in south Florida since we will have cooler temps this winter?

Possibly.

9
Cool winters help mango production, right?  We may no longer see cool winters.

Correct. They stimulate the trees to bloom, and the extent of that bloom will typically be what determines the final crop size, though there are other factors like fruit set and retention that can be determined by male/female flower ratio, etc.

The length and amount of time of the cool weather plays a big role. For instance, there is a major difference between say 7 days of nighttime lows below 60F as opposed to 10-14 days. And if the temperatures rise dramatically after the cold front, trees will often flush mixed panicles that contain both leaves and inflorescence, or sometimes flush some pure growth. This has happened for several seasons now.

For some varieties, this pattern could be a major problem in the long term in terms of getting consistent crops.

10
Typical early bloom here on a lot of the "bloom sensitive" stuff. Unfortunately that is no indication of how large the regular season 2018 crop will be.

I would wager to guess though that based on the damage incurred by Irma, coupled with what will likely be another joke of a winter which Jani above alluded to, we can likely expect another disappointing/mediocre-by-historical standard mango season in south Florida.


11
The fruit should hold on if the tree is large enough and in good health. I've got numerous Edward, Rosigold, Rosa, and Dwarf Hawaiian ( Tete Nene) trees blooming along with Jean Ellen, Florigon, Carrie, Ah Ping and others sending out some bloom as well.








12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Truly Tropical Tour - Marlys Zill's Mango
« on: November 16, 2017, 05:47:11 PM »
As none have posted the total list in the last minute of this video which says, "Mangos that do well in humid conditions and wetter soils" in alphabetical order are:

Angie, Beverly, Carrie, Juicy Peach, Maha Chanok, Marlys, Nell Petite, Pickering, Sweet Tart, Valcarrie, & Venus.

I can't recommend Angie, Carrie, or Venus for anyone wanting to grow mangos out there.

Angie has serious problems with foliar scab. It can vary from tree-to-tree but I had plenty of problems with it. Carrie trees *used* to produce well in the interior but now are susceptible to newer strains of anthracnose that will wipe out the inflorescence.

Venus is anthracnose resistant but was discovered to be highly susceptible to MBBS and probably should no longer be planted in south Florida. Zill probably won't graft it anymore.

I really appreciate your opinion and taking the time to post. I also really appreciate Marlys opinion and just again watched the video and I'm sure she states 5:25 into video that her Carrie Trees are disease free & still produce well.

I believe I located her property by name search (did not want to post location) and used as the crow flies calculator to get distance from ocean and looks like roughly 19 miles and close to Lion Club Safari. I do not know your prior areas of experimenting in Loxahatchee and was it close to her or not?

If it was close to her then of course why the variability might occur. I'm wondering if perhaps the clearing and removal of the oak trees prior to planting your Carrie Trees may have left residual fungal growth or provided areas of good future fungal growth in the soil vs. her undisturbed property. Many other guesses and it's fun to guess and of course no way to know why for sure...

Can you give an approximate location of the recent sold grove of yours? Also if I'm totally wrong and she is not located within a few miles of Lion Club Safari please let me know if you know. 

Trees & More has a huge Carrie doing fine in Martin County but it is probably 10 to 11 miles from the ocean; however, it does have plenty of oaks and pines near it.

Many variables and many unknowns in growing mango trees leads to many guesses for future outcomes...


I was in Loxahatchee Groves between E and D roads along north road. Had about 30 or more Carrie trees.

Some of them would get lucky and fruit well. Most of them got anthracnose, especially the last couple years. Some of it involved timing in terms of humidity when the blooms emerged. I had the opportunity to observe other Carrie trees in the area and saw the same thing.

As to what I'd attribute her Carries doing well, probably luck.


13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Truly Tropical Tour - Marlys Zill's Mango
« on: November 16, 2017, 02:08:10 PM »
'Hatcher' also received favorable mention.  That was a surprise to me.

That's another one that's going to go the way of the Dodo thanks to MBBS/rot.

What other mangoes are effected by this?
Terrible news about Venus as this is one of my favorites.

Anything descended from the Brooks cultivar is extremely questionable, along with maybe half of Haden descendants. We're still learning what and to what degree. Lemon Zest is another really bad one.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Truly Tropical Tour - Marlys Zill's Mango
« on: November 16, 2017, 11:16:14 AM »
'Hatcher' also received favorable mention.  That was a surprise to me.

That's another one that's going to go the way of the Dodo thanks to MBBS/rot.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Truly Tropical Tour - Marlys Zill's Mango
« on: November 16, 2017, 11:13:38 AM »
As none have posted the total list in the last minute of this video which says, "Mangos that do well in humid conditions and wetter soils" in alphabetical order are:

Angie, Beverly, Carrie, Juicy Peach, Maha Chanok, Marlys, Nell Petite, Pickering, Sweet Tart, Valcarrie, & Venus.

I can't recommend Angie, Carrie, or Venus for anyone wanting to grow mangos out there.

Angie has serious problems with foliar scab. It can vary from tree-to-tree but I had plenty of problems with it. Carrie trees *used* to produce well in the interior but now are susceptible to newer strains of anthracnose that will wipe out the inflorescence.

Venus is anthracnose resistant but was discovered to be highly susceptible to MBBS and probably should no longer be planted in south Florida. Zill probably won't graft it anymore.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Truly Tropical Tour - Marlys Zill's Mango
« on: November 14, 2017, 03:31:25 PM »
Seems she had decent clean crops from:
Marlys
Hatcher
Juicy Peach
Sweet Tart
Angie
Pickering
Neil Petite (Never heard of this one)

I was shocked as to how many trees either had very low yields, like 2 or 3, or none.  I guess I have this impression that most of ya'll in the central to south Florida area have "perfect" clime/soil/conditions for producing mangos and they should produce well most years.   Seems you have many challenges like we do with fruit trees just different in scope.

Loxahatchee is one of the worst places in Florida that mangos can be grown "successfully" (using that word rather loosely here). Mangos do not fruit well under those conditions for a variety of reasons:

1. High humidity has a depressing affect on the trees ability to flower at all, especially when temperatures are less than ideal
2. trees are more likely to flush vegetative growth at the wrong time
3. Fungus is a big problem, both on the flowers and fruit. There are aggressive strains of anthracnose that thrive in Loxahatchee that make it virtually impossible to get fruit from certain cultivars, even if they are treated with a good fungicidal program. There is also foliar scab, a big problem with certain cvs like Angie and Keitt. This can severely limit growth and impact the overall health of the tree
4. In the vent that very cold weather actually does roll through, interior areas like Loxahatchee are much more likely to experience freezing or near freezing weather, which can ruin the crop some years and set the trees back.

What fruit that you do get invariably comes out filthy. Not just because of anthracnose either....fungi like scab, sooty blotch, and flyspeck are even bigger culprits. Those are practically unheard of where I am.

You'll notice all the oaks, pine and cabbage palms out there.....excessive vegetation, coupled with lots of bodies of fresh water (ponds, canals, etc), + distance from ocean breezes, higher rainfall totals and a loamier soil that contains more nitrogen and holds more moisture = the perfect storm of garbage to crush any mango growers dreams. I can only imagine what it will be like once MBBS and "the rot" becomes firmly established out there.


17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Florida Hass Avocado
« on: November 09, 2017, 01:10:08 PM »
I really liked the Super Hass (ulala) from Squam I had last year.
I think this might fit all your criteria.

I didn't realize these were the same. In any event, that's an excellent avocado.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Florida Hass Avocado
« on: November 08, 2017, 02:48:57 PM »

Taste and production are fine. Its problem is uneven ripening

I was looking for a tree that stays small and produces tasty fruit. Is the problem with uneven ripening real bad?

I can be, yes. Seems to depend on if it likes its spot or not, plus rainfall.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Florida Hass Avocado
« on: November 08, 2017, 11:30:35 AM »
Taste and production are fine. Its problem is uneven ripening

20
If I had to choose between Butter Cream and Orange Essence, which one would it be to put into ground? I like complex flavors.

That's a pretty tough call. I'd say Orange Essence is slightly more complex. Neither had been widely planted/out long enough to derive any conclusions about their production traits.

21


The elusive Buttercream mango and Guava mango on turpentine rootstock finally arrive in Southern California.
We'll see how these do in SoCal next year.

Buttercream is new to me. Anyone tasted it?

Yes, really good. A little comparable to Venus I suppose.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Truly tropical top 5
« on: November 03, 2017, 03:54:04 PM »
Harvest Moon in West Palm Beach, Florida:



23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hialeah Red avocado (review)
« on: November 01, 2017, 08:23:41 PM »
yeah it tasted like my Brogdon

I think Brogden is better personally. Has some actual oil content to it and nuttier flavor.

Hialeah Rec is just a typical West Indian avocado flavor.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hialeah Red avocado (review)
« on: November 01, 2017, 06:28:59 PM »
Looks to be fairly in line with a standard florida avocado. Low oil, more watery, larger size.

Pretty much.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Whats up with Eldon mango
« on: October 29, 2017, 07:40:50 PM »
Alex, do you have this variety in your collection? I may be interested in scions next year. I need a regular mango flavored mango. Thanks,

Simon

Yes, a huge one.

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