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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can cherimoya grow in Vietnam?
« on: September 24, 2017, 03:02:50 AM »
I think Mikey is waiting for growers in tropical areas to tell him what happens if there's no chill hours. Will it die or just not set fruit.

Yes.  Please let me know your experiences in Florida.  Hawaii is able to grow them but I do not know if it is at higher elevation where there is chill.
They can fruit in Hawaii at  minimum 1000 ft. elevation but do better at above 2000 ft. I have some trees at 650 elevation and they fruit, but very little. No the plants don't die, they just don't fruit well. No they don't need chill in the traditional sense of temperate plant needing chill, which is below 45F. Never gets that cold here below 2000 ft. They are more like lychees than peaches in terms of temperature requirements.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: More Maui progress with Luc's garcinia
« on: September 21, 2017, 05:21:56 AM »
Guessing 3 years // planrs 6' tall
At 6 foot I'm guessing your plants are a lot more than 3 years old.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Star fruit juicer
« on: September 20, 2017, 03:04:24 AM »
Champion juicer works great and fast.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cut nut (Barringtonia edulis)
« on: September 19, 2017, 09:19:19 PM »
Got my seeds today , a 6 months germination time was mentioned ...

The way things are going now , two 7.1 quakes in less than a month in Mexico , powerful hurricanes one after another , not even wanna mention the political situation , N. Korea etc....I will still plant the seeds that is if Nibiru doesn't wipe us out on September 23 2017...lol...

Oscar , you mentioned ' cooking to be safe ' in an other post about Cut Nut ....why is that ?

So who else started these from seed and how long did they take to sprout ?
Don't remember that. I ate my cut nuts raw and they are delicious that way. Maybe you confused with another type of nut?

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can cherimoya grow in Vietnam?
« on: September 16, 2017, 09:38:20 PM »
Lots of fruits you don't see in Asia. That doesn't mean they can't grow  there. Many south American fruits are totally unknown there. I think atemoyas are worth a try. They grow at sea level here.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can cherimoya grow in Vietnam?
« on: September 16, 2017, 09:07:14 PM »
Yes, for sure. But you need higher elevations. Starting points somewhere 600-700 meters  in tropics far from equator and roughly 1200 meters close to equator like Southern Vietnam. I've been having local Sri Lankan cherimoyas this entire past week even though we are clearly deep in tropics. Main production areas here at 2000 meters. Roughly 6000 feet elevation.

I wan to try to grow cherimoya in Ho Chi Minh city in a rural area call cu chi.  Please let me know if there are certain variety that can tolerate heat and rainy season.
No there is not. Try growing atemoyas instead. They are tropical.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Rare pineapples
« on: September 15, 2017, 04:40:27 PM »
I am currently planting side shoots of the red pineapple, so hopefully next year i will have enough to sell to any forum member interested.

Awesome, sign me up for as many as possible. Is the flesh red as well?
No, only exterior is red. But is very good tasting. Will make announcement next summer when i'm ready to send some. Will have only very limited quantity.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Krasuey's Sapodilla
« on: September 15, 2017, 12:55:17 AM »
I've seen a few posts from Australia saying it is everbearing, sweet, and much better than Sao Manilla, etc.

Do you guys have any info on Krasuey's Sapodilla?  Anybody have it?



-Sonny
I have it. No Krasuey is not everbearing, at least not here. I would not say it is much better than Sao Manila.

9
The combination of flooding and high winds makes it really hard for plants to stay in place. Softened soil makes falling over so much easier. Great to hear most people's trees made it throuh ok even with the flooding.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: A jackfruit named Irma
« on: September 12, 2017, 10:59:32 PM »
With that heavy fruit on would have even been more likely to snap and do more extensive damage. So smart to remove it. (I wonder how many people will name their new babies Irma?  ;D )
That is an unusual shaped jackfruit. Most here are elongated in shape.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Category 4 Hurricane Irma
« on: September 12, 2017, 10:54:18 PM »
We sat it out like most of our neighbors. Power went out at 10pm and hasn't come back on. Two large pine trees fell and narrowly missed my house in a V with the house in the middle.

All in all, I need a bigger generator for my well, a better chainsaw for downed trees, and gotta figure something out on the stove since its a gas stove but somehow requires electricity to work. grrr. Hopefully we get power back today.

Count your blessing on those pine trees! There must be some work around for your stove. That electric starter is there so you don't have to burn a pilot light like in the good old days. I suppose your can turn the gas knob but gas will not flow unless the electronic ignition is working? For safety reasons? But still your stove is unusable without electricity which is ridiculous. There should be a simple way to bypass the electronics.
Most gas stoves have piezo electric starter (sparker). Gas should still flow. So you can light it with a lighter.
PS Glad everybody's house so far in reports is still up!

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Luc's blooms in Hawaii
« on: September 11, 2017, 11:06:31 PM »
Thanks i amjust surprised as the trees  barley  6 foot
Congrats! What area of Maui are you in?

13
While it's true that no tree can be totally immune to high winds, it's also true that some trees are more susceptible than others. From my very limited experience i would rank them like this:
Poor resistance: Longan, lychee, abiu, jamaican cherry (muntingia)
Medium resistance: Avocado
High resistance: Mango, Jackfruit, Chico, Java plum, Ice Cream Bean, Santol

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 10, 2017, 07:45:15 PM »
Yes, it's nice when your hybridization project isn't starting from scratch.  You are fortunate to have that material.
Nice if it is stable from seed but for asexual propagation it doesn't matter.
We always talk about Thai and Malaysian selections, what about quality varieties of Indonesian origin?
Peter
si
I believe Indonesia shares a lot of the same varieties as those in Malaysia. The island of Borneo is belonging part of it to Indonesia (Kalimantan) and the other part to Malaysia. I know that some of the Indonesian vendors go to Malaysian parts also to collect seeds.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 10, 2017, 04:18:16 PM »
Nice report.  I wonder how I could get material like that here....
This business of hybridizing durian, then growing out the seedlings seems almost like a project that would have to be completed by the next generation of horticulturists!
Peter
There are lots of different species corsses that have been done or occured naturally in Indonesia. I have a few different hybrids i'm growing out. The question is how stable they are from seed? I think it's been done over several generations so thay might be already quite stabilized?

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Green sapote vs Mamey sapote
« on: September 10, 2017, 03:22:02 AM »
Green sapote tastes very similar to mamey. But worth growing because some like green sapote even better, and also each will have different seasons. But green sapote from seed can take a very long time to fruit.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 09, 2017, 09:30:33 PM »
Ok, you're skeptical of the effect of fertilizer. And i can't prove that it's what made the difference. But consider this mine have been fruiting for a whole month now, and you say you have only seen aborted fruit so far? Location is probably not a factor as i'm very close to Peepekeo and Hakalau. Are the places you're talking about close to sea level?

Elevations of the two orchards are about 600' and 900'. Premature fruits have mostly been from broken branches from the weight of the fruits. Only a few random premature drops. Lots of monster fruits still maturing.

All my anecdotal impressions suggest the productivity is purely weather-based with no connection to fertilizing, but it's all speculation.
Ok, that's quite a lot higher than where i have my durians planted, which is only 100 feet, and may explain later production. If you look at my initial post i said that high production was probably a combination of ideal weather and fertilizing, not just the fertilizing alone.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 09, 2017, 06:31:41 AM »
Great pics, thanks Oscar. I would be very keen to taste that chanee seedling. We're seeing the same phenomenon in Hakalau this year, but I'm skeptical of the effect of fertilizing in your case, because neither of the two durian orchards I work for have been fertilized at all in the past 2 years and there are hundreds of fruits on the trees and 3 successive seasons at the same time--big fruits, small fruits, zillions of flowers. These are mostly gumpun/monthong fruits, maybe some chanee. So far only premature drops, no fruits ready to eat yet. I've had a few durians of smaller types from other places this season that are apparently producing in great abundance, like D132 and Pohakulani, Tomorrow I will be tasting a "sulok sionggong" durian for the first time, a hybrid of D. zibethinus and D. graveolens grafted by David Frenz. The spelling and name is dubious. The tree is fairly young, about 6 years I think, and flowered for the first time this year. Likewise for a puangmani tree, which flowered in the 2nd season. It's a great year for some of the more obscure durian varieties to finally fruit. There are so many durian growers around here I'm having trouble keeping track of what's in season.

By the way, does anyone know if it's a problem for pollen to get wet while collecting? I was collecting pollen to pollinate more puangmani earlier this evening and it was a bit drizzly. We put the flowers in ziploc bags and I hope they don't mold before tomorrow afternoon. We've been lucky to catch dry weather collecting pollen previously.
Ok, you're skeptical of the effect of fertilizer. And i can't prove that it's what made the difference. But consider this mine have been fruiting for a whole month now, and you say you have only seen aborted fruit so far? Location is probably not a factor as i'm very close to Peepekeo and Hakalau. Are the places you're talking about close to sea level?

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Good luck everyone!
« on: September 09, 2017, 03:40:03 AM »
Hi Mike, somehow i think a miracle will happen and you and your orchard will be spared. You sell too many good fruits and plants, which gives enjoyment to so many people. Powers that be protect you and everyone else in Florida!!! Everyone is wishing you well. Stay safe.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 09, 2017, 03:34:07 AM »
That's awesome Oscar! I love durians but the only good ones we get here are the Mao Shan King from Malaysia which are very expensive. Just wondering, can the Durians be shipped to the mainland? Congratulations on the magnificent harvest!

Simon
ri
Yes they can be shipped to the mainland, but it's hard to find a courier that would want to deal with the smell. Also the demand is much larger than the supply right in Hawaii, so why would anyone to go through the hassle of shipping them?

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 09, 2017, 03:30:45 AM »
Very nice Oscar!  How they do at the farmer's markets?
They sell very easily. Big Asian population here, and also lots of durian fanatics, and very few people growing in large quantities. So far i've sold over 750 pounds. Probably eaten way over 100 pounds. This is just from 4 early harvests.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 09, 2017, 03:25:47 AM »
Very nice fruits Oscar, you are so Lucky! 😄 what kind of fertilize you use and how often?
Fertilizer is very expensive here, so i am usually very stingy with it. But this year i splurged and it paid off. I fertilized them when they just started to form buds with 0-0-50 and a concentrated nitrogen fertilizer 21-0-0. Two months later i repeated again and they exploded with flowers. Some of the branches look like giant jaboticabas, with flowers all up and down and around all the branches. The ground is totally littered with dropped flower petals. 

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 09, 2017, 03:19:13 AM »
Great stuff Oscar. February to April is the main season here but last season I was eating durians from January until late June (June ones from Marshals farm at Kuranda at 400m alt.).My red prawn and penang88 are my most prized varieties and are covered in flower buds now which is 2 moths early, and my young monthong has tiny buds also.Winter was far warmer and drier than usual and that could be the reason.
er
I am guessing that the durian trees will keep fruiting at least until December, so that will be 5 months of fruits. Yay!

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 09, 2017, 03:16:15 AM »
Excellent update and pics.  How do you rate each fruit?

My favorites are the small seedling Chanees. They have a rich butterscotch flavor and nice dark golden flesh. Also very easy to sell as they are small (1-3 pounds) so not so expensive for the customer. The grafted Chanee comes in second, nice taste but not as rich. The sea urchin durian (oxleyanus) comes in third. Has a very nice taste, no odor, but.very sharp spines, hard to open, and the fruits are a lot smaller. Also the fruit ripens and spoils very fast. The Monthong comes in last. Very huge fruits (10 to 25 pounds), but the texture of this particular tree is kind of stringy. Pulp is whitish and not as rich as the Chanees. Harder to sell because just one fruit is very expensive for customer.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Amazing Durian Year
« on: September 09, 2017, 03:07:57 AM »
Oscar,

I normally bought only the yellow exterior fruits with a tiny crack developed, and avoid the green skin ones for fear of they were picked too soon. Your green ones must be a total different variety. Do people need to wear helmet when under the trees with fruits?

How old are the trees from seeds to have fruit?
All those fruits are "drops", so they are all going to ripen fine. They turn color as they ripen.
I was picking some up off the ground when one hurled towards the ground. With some of the fruits weighing over 20 pounds and being 40+ feet up in the air, those spiky projectiles are very menacing. Helmet would only protect your head. A hit to anywhere else on the body would also be extremely devastating. The land is totally flat so the come straight, there is no rolling. One of the vendors dropped a box that i was delivering and all the durians rolled down his driveway towards me. That was an interesting experience, calling for an immediate withdrawal. haha

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