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Messages - fruitlovers

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1
Compendium of Information on Seed Storage Behavior, 2 Volumes, by T. D. Hong, et al., published by Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, U.K.
I have an extra volume 1, if interested in buying PM me. It covers plants with genus A-H.

2
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Brazil nuts - why so hard to find
« on: November 20, 2017, 03:08:57 PM »
I sell paradise nuts (Lecythis zabucajo) seeds when available (usually end of summer). They are just as good tasting as brazil nuts, some think even better, and much easier to crack. I did bring 8 little brazil nuts back from Brazil, so hope to fruit them here in some very distant day. Already have a couple of 8 ft. trees growing.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Grafted Durian Cultivars in Florida
« on: November 19, 2017, 08:13:54 PM »
In very marginal growing areas you are better off anyway trying from seed. Seedling plants are more vigorous and develop better taproot. Seeds from good cultivars will produce quality fruit. I know that from experience since i have planted and fruiting both grafted and seedling trees. Some of my seedling trees have better tasting fruit than known clutivars. I can supply seeds of Chanee, Monthong, and sometimes have D. kutejensis and D. oxleyanus.
BTW, Frankies nursery has stopped shipping plants.

4
The place is really a gold mine for the rare fruit lover. There are so many great seeds to collect. Members in Florida can fly there in just 8 hours to Campinas. Loranzi told me they are even willing to pick up people from the airport, which is only 40 minutes drive from the garden. The flight is 8 hours, much shorter than going to Hawaii, which from Florida is a 11+ hour flight. The only down side for Americans is that they need to get a Brazil visa. It costs $160, but is good for 10 years. While in Campinas you might also want to visit Helton and Sergio Sartori, the two largest collections of fruit trees in Brazil. Also fabulous places to visit.
Oscar: can you share with us what new seeds you were able to bring back from Brazil and what new fruits you were able to taste or discover? I'm really envious/curious!
Will do it later, right now i'm busy planting them all.  8)  Most i won't have for sale, except for 2 exceptions: Jaboitcaba Escarlate and Beach Cambuca, Myrciaria strigipes. Those 2 are available, first come first served. PM me if interested.

5
I have about a dozen large rainforest plums (E. candolleana). What i notice about them is, like someone already said, there is a whole lot of variation in taste, but not so much in size or shape. Some are really excellent and others have a kind of an off taste. They are all extremely productive here. The plants were slow growing at first and then get into turbo charge mode.
I just got to taste some other excellent eugenias in Brazil. One is a surinam called nude. No it is not a topless surinam.  ;D ;D  Nude means cream colored in portuguese. It was very sweet with zero resin taste. Another excellent surinam was a dwarf  round shaped surinam. Another excellent one was a sweet selection of uvaia. I will try to post separate threads on these as time permits.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: More Progress on Maui with Luke's Garcinia
« on: November 18, 2017, 04:05:21 AM »
One of my trees is finally starting to flower. It has many dozens of blooms. It's about 12 feet tall. The other 3 trees, which are a bit smaller, no blooms yet.

7
My favorite was Z4, very sweet and juiciy. I think it's even sweeter than Sabara. Another very good one, not in photo, was Ponhema. Also very sweet and juicy. The Escarlate was second favorite, very similar to red hybrid jaboticaba. Ofoourse havind different types of jaboticabas extends the season also.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / 5 Types of Jaboticabas i got to taste in Brazil
« on: November 16, 2017, 11:41:47 PM »


9
The place is really a gold mine for the rare fruit lover. There are so many great seeds to collect. Members in Florida can fly there in just 8 hours to Campinas. Loranzi told me they are even willing to pick up people from the airport, which is only 40 minutes drive from the garden. The flight is 8 hours, much shorter than going to Hawaii, which from Florida is a 11+ hour flight. The only down side for Americans is that they need to get a Brazil visa. It costs $160, but is good for 10 years. While in Campinas you might also want to visit Helton and Sergio Sartori, the two largest collections of fruit trees in Brazil. Also fabulous places to visit.

10
This is a 24 minute interview at Instituto Plantarum botanical garden, located at Nueva Odessa, Campinas, Brazil, on November 10, 2017. The interview focuses on the botanical garden and on tropical fruits. Some questions previously suggested by forum members are included and answered by Lorenzi. In case you don't know, he is the author of Brazilian Fruits and Fruits in Brazil (Frutas No Brasil), as well as a couple of dozen other botanical books. The garden is 25 acres. Though not large the collection is very large. It is also a very beautiful place, and all the plants are very well labeled. Lorenzi was very gracious in giving me a personal tour of the place. Hope you enjoy it! let me know if you have any questions.
https://youtu.be/--UgLFLReC4

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Can coconut palm survive anywhere in CA?
« on: November 15, 2017, 03:14:58 AM »
Don't think anybody has been able to fruit coconuts in California. They don't do well when temperatures drop below 50F, especially for extended periods. Also they don't like low humidity levels.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Hunting the elusive Delicious Monster
« on: November 15, 2017, 12:16:15 AM »
Grows wild here too. Climbs all the way up coconut trees. The fruit ripening can be speeded up by placing the fruits in a closed brown paper bag.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mamme Americana is dioceious?
« on: November 14, 2017, 06:37:35 PM »
Oscar
        I would be glad to send you a photo of the white flower of the mamey tree I suppose to be male, (when it flowers) if you can identify it.  I also thought of chopping it down but decided to save it for its shade

Would have to look at a lot of the flowers, not just one, as a tree can have both male and hermaphrodite flowers.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Myrica Rubra
« on: November 14, 2017, 04:40:05 PM »
On a slightly different topic, I have seedling plants of Myrica rubra. Has anyone been succesful in fruiting it in the tropics? Does it need chill hours to fruit?

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mamme Americana is dioceious?
« on: November 14, 2017, 04:37:18 PM »
Twenty year back a friend of mine gave me a  MA seedling (30cm tall) .It grew up and when 10 meters tall started to flower but never has fruited. Another friend when I complained it did not fruit told me it needed a "female" companion. He sent me two new seedlins 6 years back. Both these grew up and started to flower and fruit profusely every year (months of october-december.  Would these last two trees fruit without the presence of the "male" which flowers but does not fruit ?????
u
Have you really looked at the flowers? Are you sure your unfruitful tree is male only, and has no hermaphrodite flowers? Many trees fail to fruit for a variety of reasons apart from lack of pollination. I would guess, based on my experience that your two new trees would have fruited, even if planted by themselves.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mamme Americana is dioceious?
« on: November 14, 2017, 12:42:16 PM »
I have 2 mammee trees, both planted on different properties. Both fruit fine.
Techinically garcinias are supposed to be all dioecious. In fact they are almost always able to bear fruit without cross pollination, with a few very limited exceptions. Usually they are either having some hermaphrodite flowers or are able to bear fruit without pollen (apomictic), as in case of mangosteen.

17
Thanks for all the suggestions. I did the interview already. Used the questions i thought appropriate. Will post it on youtube as soon as i'm able to. Yes it's in english. Lorenzi speaks english quite well.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Nephelium hypoleucum - Korlan
« on: November 05, 2017, 09:49:46 PM »
Korlan grows in northern Thailand in hill regions. The taste is a bit is like lychee but more sour. Like other nephelium it has male, female, and hermaphrodite trees, so you must plant more than one to insure pollination.

19
If you are planning to graft in just a couple of days then leave the mango scions out of the fridge. If you are planning to graft in a couple of weeks then i would put them in the fridge. But use only the warmest part of the fridge, which is about 40-50F, And that is the area with the produce bin, usually on the bottom of the fridge.

20
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Brazil nuts - why so hard to find
« on: November 04, 2017, 12:28:52 AM »
I would like to obtain some Brazil nut seeds but it seems almost impossible
Can anyone let me know the reason for this?
What is the accepted scientific name and synonyms
Thanks
Kevin
Betholletia excelsa
The seeds sold for eating are not fresh enough and will not sprout. It is very difficult to get seeds from Brazil due to their agricultural rules and very slow postal system.

21
Who should I contact at Vendas Plantarum to get some books that I ordered and paid for last year and never received?  After three months, I wrote VinŪcius Bernardes at Vendas Plantarum and he told me he would look into it, but I still didn't receive them.  I wrote him a second time, he said he would look into it, but still didn't receive the books or a refund.  (My order #164033).  Should we not order directly from Instituto Plantarum?
I believe Vendas Plantarum is just the sales department of Instituto Plantarum. You can email Sheila and she will help you with your problem: sheila@plantarum.com.br

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: How to open a mango seed. . . .
« on: October 29, 2017, 11:47:01 PM »
I remember Chapman field, USDA experimental station, in Homestead also used a special prying tool to ease opening. It was kind of like a needle nose pliers in reverse. Instead of tightening the ends would pry open when squeezed. They opened a lot of seeds so this tool really came in handy. When planting a lot of mango seeds for rootstock opening the husks also makes them all germinate more uniformly, rather than spread out germination.


Opening pliers. Yes, these would work very well, especially if you had to do this a lot.
The ones i saw looked somewhat like the ring opening pliers.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: More Maui progress with Luc's garcinia
« on: October 29, 2017, 07:19:22 PM »




I believe this is the first time my Lucís garcinia has flowered. (Itís easy to miss these little flowers). Anyway, seems like fruit are developing. Iíd say this tree is about 3m tall and 5 years old?
Peter
Have 4 trees that looks just like yours Peter. But so far no flowers, or at least none that i have noticed.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: More Maui progress with Luc's garcinia
« on: October 29, 2017, 07:17:51 PM »
I guess youíre going to have to hand pollinate. Seems Hawaii has some issues with pollination. I think Oscar was talking about g. prainiana needing hand pollination in Hawaii while that easily sets on its own in CR.
So far only an issue with G. prainiana. All other garcinias here self pollinate. Other locations have reported same problem of lack of proper pollinator, not just Hawaii, in the case of prainiana. But trying hand pollination on Luc's couldn't hurt.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Is cherimoya better than atemoya?
« on: October 29, 2017, 05:57:42 PM »
I am in the atemoya camp.We have had this discussion many times on this forum.
Yes, and i think you mentioned there were very few cherimoyas grown in Australia? Could that be why you favor atemoya?  :D

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