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Author Topic: Spicezee  (Read 11295 times)

JF

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Spicezee
« on: January 15, 2015, 07:01:54 PM »
One of the best fruit in the world......
I decided to axe all my undesirable guavas and planted the best hybrid in the last 20 years.


BMc

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2015, 07:07:16 PM »
Its pretty incredible. I put one in two years back. Fruited well first year and nothing held this year. Conflicting reports on its chill requirements have led me to give it a go. If I don't see decent fruit next year I'm gonna have to dig it up. Its vigorous here, but is not attacked by the same pests as peaches and nectarines, so its almost perfect if the whole fruiting thing works out...

I hope yours bears in abundance!

nullzero

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2015, 07:11:34 PM »
I always loved the plouts and other hybrids, it must be pretty good from what you say :).
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

JF

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2015, 07:22:40 PM »
Its pretty incredible. I put one in two years back. Fruited well first year and nothing held this year. Conflicting reports on its chill requirements have led me to give it a go. If I don't see decent fruit next year I'm gonna have to dig it up. Its vigorous here, but is not attacked by the same pests as peaches and nectarines, so its almost perfect if the whole fruiting thing works out...

I hope yours bears in abundance!


thx Bruce
the reports from here is that they fruit in abundance but with the climate changing every year I wouldn't be surprise if it's short lived.

Nullzy
this is a nectaplum hybrid check out some of the reviews.

« Last Edit: January 15, 2015, 07:31:58 PM by JF »

tanguy

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2015, 12:32:52 AM »
One of the best fruit in the world......
I decided to axe all my undesirable guavas and planted the best hybrid in the last 20 years.




How were the fruits of your tree, Frank?
 I purchased 4 trees of this nectaplum more than 2 years ago (in 5-gallon pots). The first year when they were still in pots, I got about 4 fruits each pots but they were not very good. So, I sold 2 pots. The second year (last year) I put 1 tree in the ground and the fruits from that tree were still not very good, almost the same as the first year's fruits. Fruits from my other little trees such as Snow Queen nectarine, Artic Star nectarine and Double Delight nectarine were much better. I hope my nectaplum fruits will be better in the next couple years (when the trees get bigger).
Tam

venturabananas

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2015, 12:45:56 AM »
This plant was terrible in my yard.  Bland fruit and the plant was a brown rot magnet.  I dug it up and tossed it after 3 years of giving it a shot.  I'll take Snow Queen nectarine over Spice Zee any day!

JF

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2015, 10:10:11 AM »
One of the best fruit in the world......
I decided to axe all my undesirable guavas and planted the best hybrid in the last 20 years.




How were the fruits of your tree, Frank?
 I purchased 4 trees of this nectaplum more than 2 years ago (in 5-gallon pots). The first year when they were still in pots, I got about 4 fruits each pots but they were not very good. So, I sold 2 pots. The second year (last year) I put 1 tree in the ground and the fruits from that tree were still not very good, almost the same as the first year's fruits. Fruits from my other little trees such as Snow Queen nectarine, Artic Star nectarine and Double Delight nectarine were much better. I hope my nectaplum fruits will be better in the next couple years (when the trees get bigger).
Tam


Thanks for you input Tam and Ventura. Spice zee was recommended by a tropical fruit expert the owner of Park Hill Orchard in Escondido and he's been after me for a few years to plant out more stone fruits. He spays his trees when they are dormant with lime sulfer or cooper and never had any issue with brown rot or anything else. I welcome all inputs I like to know your experience with spice zee nectaplum.

Bush2Beach

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2015, 11:11:53 AM »
That's prime tropical fruit territory your taking up with that stone fruit. You can go buy zee spice nectaplums at the market but not any of the other awesome fruits coming from your wonderful yard in the highly desirable climate zone for sub tropicals. Any one can grow stone fruits! Your pushing the envelope with all this killer rare fruit and got talked into planting an old stone fruit  ;)  I thought your yard gets less than 100 chill hours and rarely below 45 degree. Either way from the looks of your yard you'll figure out how to fruit it there.
The grass is always greener I guess. If only my Annonas grew that fast, or I could fruit a mango..
I have yet to see Pluerry's sold anywhere , that is one to add to the yard if you want to taste.
http://www.davewilson.com/product-information/product/sweet-treat-pluerry-interspecific-plum

BMc

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2015, 04:49:56 PM »



Here is mine. When perfectly ripe they are amazing. Less than perfect ripeness will yield bland mealy fryut. Like I said, it's got one more year to show if it is a worthwhile producer in my climate.

ClayMango

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2015, 06:55:55 PM »
That's prime tropical fruit territory your taking up with that stone fruit. You can go buy zee spice nectaplums at the market but not any of the other awesome fruits coming from your wonderful yard in the highly desirable climate zone for sub tropicals. Any one can grow stone fruits! Your pushing the envelope with all this killer rare fruit and got talked into planting an old stone fruit  ;)  I thought your yard gets less than 100 chill hours and rarely below 45 degree. Either way from the looks of your yard you'll figure out how to fruit it there.
The grass is always greener I guess. If only my Annonas grew that fast, or I could fruit a mango..
I have yet to see Pluerry's sold anywhere , that is one to add to the yard if you want to taste.
http://www.davewilson.com/product-information/product/sweet-treat-pluerry-interspecific-plum


I've heard from several people there are some amazing stone fruits out there...Going to give a few a try that a friend mentioned to me out there in Escondido :)

Edit* JF if you dont get enough Chill hours in the next few years, I'll come dig it up for you :)
Thinking about joining a Fruitaholics anonymous support group...Fruit addiction has taken over my life!

venturabananas

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2015, 09:57:18 PM »
Thanks for you input Tam and Ventura. Spice zee was recommended by a tropical fruit expert the owner of Park Hill Orchard in Escondido and he's been after me for a few years to plant out more stone fruits. He spays his trees when they are dormant with lime sulfer or cooper and never had any issue with brown rot or anything else. I welcome all inputs I like to know your experience with spice zee nectaplum.

Some people who really know fruits rave about Spice Zee.  Maybe it is a climate thing.  I don't get much heat where I am along the coast.  But I get a lot of humidity, and even though I spray copper and sulfur, I can't eliminate brown rot.  Virtually every stone fruit in my neighborhood has it to some degree.  So there was no point keeping an especially susceptible plant that I wasn't enjoying the fruit from.

JF

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2015, 10:28:47 PM »
That's prime tropical fruit territory your taking up with that stone fruit. You can go buy zee spice nectaplums at the market but not any of the other awesome fruits coming from your wonderful yard in the highly desirable climate zone for sub tropicals. Any one can grow stone fruits! Your pushing the envelope with all this killer rare fruit and got talked into planting an old stone fruit  ;)  I thought your yard gets less than 100 chill hours and rarely below 45 degree. Either way from the looks of your yard you'll figure out how to fruit it there.
The grass is always greener I guess. If only my Annonas grew that fast, or I could fruit a mango..
I have yet to see Pluerry's sold anywhere , that is one to add to the yard if you want to taste.
http://www.davewilson.com/product-information/product/sweet-treat-pluerry-interspecific-plum


I've heard from several people there are some amazing stone fruits out there...Going to give a few a try that a friend mentioned to me out there in Escondido :)

Clay

you should listen to your friend in Escondido he knows what he's talking about.....a home grown stone fruit is as good as any mango,actually, any tropical fruit :D
go to our scion exchange in the OC Fairground and pick up some scions,

Edit* JF if you dont get enough Chill hours in the next few years, I'll come dig it up for you :)

simon_grow

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2015, 11:09:59 PM »
Nice pick up JF. My friend has all the new hybrids planted at his yard and they fruit very heavily in general so they need thinning. Before he knew about thinning, his fruit were bland because of overproduction. After thinning and addition of potassium fertilizers, his fruit quality has dramatically increased with much sweeter taste. Please keep us updated JF!

Simon

merce3

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2015, 11:40:44 AM »
i use serenade on my stone fruits and it seems to keep the rot at bay

JF

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2015, 01:57:31 PM »
Nice pick up JF. My friend has all the new hybrids planted at his yard and they fruit very heavily in general so they need thinning. Before he knew about thinning, his fruit were bland because of overproduction. After thinning and addition of potassium fertilizers, his fruit quality has dramatically increased with much sweeter taste. Please keep us updated JF!

Simon

Ok Simon
I'm getting ready to jank out a cherimoya seedling put in gold kist apricot and double delight nectarine
Laguna Hills nursery received their bareroots this Friday go check them out and support Gary in his new location in Santa ana

NathanC

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2015, 07:17:29 PM »
Speaking of stone fruits, garden prince almond seems like an nice alternative to places where oil-rich avocado and macadamia nut can't grow, while still having low chill.

ClayMango

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2015, 11:53:58 AM »
JF

What worthy Guava still remain in your Yard?
Thinking about joining a Fruitaholics anonymous support group...Fruit addiction has taken over my life!

JF

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2015, 03:48:16 PM »
JF

What worthy Guava still remain in your Yard?


Only guava standing is Jalisco red.....

Here is an aprium, decide with this after consulting with our friend in Escondido, and the 10' cherimoya seedling in the background that will bite the dust. If I get fruits from spice Z and Cot N Candy in July I'll post it.last on the list will be arctic star nectarine another recommendation from our friend.





« Last Edit: January 19, 2015, 07:16:48 PM by JF »

tanguy

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2015, 07:09:30 PM »
JF

What worthy Guava still remain in your Yard?

Only guava standing is Jalisco red.....

Here is an aprium, decide with this after Counseling with our friend in Escondido, and the 10' cherimoya seedling in the background that will bite the dust. If I get fruits from spice Z and Cot N Candy in July I'll post it.last on the list will be arctic star nectarine another recommendation from our friend.


Congratulations Frank.
Aprium fruits are really good.  Costco sales them for $4/lb. I got 2 trees last year. My Cot-N-Candy had 5 fruits and Flavor Delight had 12 fruits (probably because Flavor Delight needs less chilling than Cot-N-Candy). They were excellent, very sweet and flavorful.

JF

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2015, 09:10:02 PM »
JF

What worthy Guava still remain in your Yard?




Congratulations Frank.
Aprium fruits are really good.  Costco sales them for $4/lb. I got 2 trees last year. My Cot-N-Candy had 5 fruits and Flavor Delight had 12 fruits (probably because Flavor Delight needs less chilling than Cot-N-Candy). They were excellent, very sweet and flavorful.
I'm glad to hear Tan. You are in riverside so you probably have plenty of chill hours.

marklee

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2015, 01:15:19 AM »
You guys in So Cal, there are some real good stone fruits that don't ned high chill hours, and even the "Dave Wilson" varieties  that say they need high around 300-500 can fruit where I have my sensitive plants. Take Blenheim or Royal apricot, they are supposed to only fruit at 400 hours, but I can get plenty each summer, and we're lucky to get 100 actual chill hours each year. Even my friends in the warmest parts of Vista have fruited Pawpaw, Pluerry, Stella cherry and some real good apples, pears, and stone fruit crosses. I just ordered the "Nadie" a true cherry plum cross unlike Pluerry.

In order to save space I have 4 rootstocks planted 18-24 inches apart and have grafted about 30 stone fruit varieties. I'm just going to experiment with chill hours and some force bloom methods to see what comes out.

I also grafted a bunch of Asian pears and different apples. My high chill apple varieties do fine here such as Granny Smith (400 hours), Beverly Hills (300 hours) Mutsu (500 hours) Pink lady, Fuji (500 hours).

I have 3 varities of Pawpaw in the ground, all planted in the same hole, they have flowered, but no fruit have set yet.

Good luck!

JF

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2015, 01:12:34 PM »
You guys in So Cal, there are some real good stone fruits that don't ned high chill hours, and even the "Dave Wilson" varieties  that say they need high around 300-500 can fruit where I have my sensitive plants. Take Blenheim or Royal apricot, they are supposed to only fruit at 400 hours, but I can get plenty each summer, and we're lucky to get 100 actual chill hours each year. Even my friends in the warmest parts of Vista have fruited Pawpaw, Pluerry, Stella cherry and some real good apples, pears, and stone fruit crosses. I just ordered the "Nadie" a true cherry plum cross unlike Pluerry.

In order to save space I have 4 rootstocks planted 18-24 inches apart and have grafted about 30 stone fruit varieties. I'm just going to experiment with chill hours and some force bloom methods to see what comes out.

I also grafted a bunch of Asian pears and different apples. My high chill apple varieties do fine here such as Granny Smith (400 hours), Beverly Hills (300 hours) Mutsu (500 hours) Pink lady, Fuji (500 hours).

I have 3 varities of Pawpaw in the ground, all planted in the same hole, they have flowered, but no fruit have set yet.

Good luck!


Thanks Mark,very interesting. I wonder if Wilson's nursery is using the Utah chill hours ( below 55F). I count my chill hours by the USDA model(below 45F). I hope to be in Chula Vista in mid February I'll mail you.

Planted out my last stone fruit, Arctic Star

« Last Edit: January 21, 2015, 02:30:00 PM by JF »

marklee

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #22 on: January 21, 2015, 10:06:37 PM »
Frank, I use the www.getchill.net website and check the chill hours, you go to the nearest weather station on wunderground website and get the weather station data and put it into the chill calculator.

Anyway, the Arctic Star is a good variety, Arctic Jay is supposed to be good but needs a lot of chill.

BMc

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #23 on: January 22, 2015, 02:14:48 AM »
Using that calculator my chill hours are:

Below 45 Model: 0 chill hours
Between 45 and 32 Model: 0 chill hours
Utah Model: -1965 chill units
Dynamic Model (experimental): 0 chill portions

So, I guess getting a reliable crop from this tree is probably out of the question here?

starling1

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Re: Spicezee
« Reply #24 on: January 22, 2015, 03:19:29 AM »
Its pretty incredible. I put one in two years back. Fruited well first year and nothing held this year. Conflicting reports on its chill requirements have led me to give it a go. If I don't see decent fruit next year I'm gonna have to dig it up. Its vigorous here, but is not attacked by the same pests as peaches and nectarines, so its almost perfect if the whole fruiting thing works out...

I hope yours bears in abundance!

Mine came with small fruit and held them, but I  was not  able to repeat this success having tried bunch of things. Lasted 2 years in my patch, ended up on the bonfire in the end.  I don't have a good track record with prunus though.

Ot, but you should consider getting the dwarf coconuts from daleys if you haven't already, mine have been racing along and haven't been bothered by the cold whatever. Does this man they will bear? No. But it's a good sign. They're definitely worth a shot in Brisbane, mine aren't even really in a frost protected spot.At worst I'll end up with a pretty palm tree I guess.

 

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