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Author Topic: Retail prices for Floridian orchards shows grim picture  (Read 274 times)

Millet

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Retail prices for Floridian orchards shows grim picture
« on: April 21, 2017, 02:46:42 PM »
In 10 years, Florida's round orange production fell from an average 342 boxes per acre down to 163 boxes per acre. That is a 52% reduction.
The report also noted break-even or negative cash flow groves are selling at discounted prices. The University of Florida benchmarks the typical all-in production costs for processed oranges is $2,235 per acre. Given that, the break-even number for a grove would be 225 boxes per acre receiving $2.28 per pound solids delivered (assuming 5.86 pound solids per box).

http://www.freshplaza.com/article/174155/Retail-prices-for-Floridian-orchards-shows-grim-picture
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 02:49:48 PM by Millet »

spaugh

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Re: Retail prices for Floridian orchards shows grim picture
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2017, 05:50:50 PM »
Maybe enough people grow citrus at home there is not enough retail market.  I quit buying orange juice once it got above 3 or 4$ a gallon.  We still buy the mandarin oranges rom the store but are working towards never having to buy those again either.  What amazes me when i drive around here is how much water and resources are spent on trees that don't produce fruit.  Imagine how cheap fresh fruit would be if all these business parks etc were growing fruit trees instead of ornamentals.  It doesnt make much sense really.  Especially in CA where all the trees need irrigation.

Citradia

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Re: Retail prices for Floridian orchards shows grim picture
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2017, 07:38:52 PM »
Oj will get more expensive as the citrus trees die off from greening. Eventually people won't have them in yards either unless the species can be saved from greening.

 

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