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Messages - TheDom

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: I feel like bragging a little
« on: May 26, 2017, 06:03:27 PM »
Congrats man!

2
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Fresh Jackfruit
« on: May 22, 2017, 10:57:18 PM »
Ripe Jackfruit (NS-1) from around 5 pounds to 30 pounds on the tree at $2 per pound.

Call, text or email me. Don't PM me.

rayfbayer@gmail.com

412.860.777

Ray
You're missing a digit from your phone number Ray.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Flower Buds on African Pride
« on: May 20, 2017, 12:02:45 AM »
If you can dry and freeze the pollen, it will last up to a few months in the freezer. Reference: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304423805003717

I use one of those mini dehumidifiers inside a ziploc freezer bag as my dessication chamber. Just put your open pollen container in the bag with the dehumidifier for 90min, then cap the container and put it straight in the freezer.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000H0XFCS/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1495252865&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=eva+dry+dehumidifier&dpPl=1&dpID=41DkN9qQr3L&ref=plSrch

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Are Atemoya seeds true to type
« on: May 14, 2017, 10:30:52 PM »
No. As most atemoya are only a generation or two removed from a pure cherimoya x sugar apple hybrid, they're generally highly variable from seed.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugar apple pollination experiment
« on: May 11, 2017, 06:57:07 PM »
I have nitidulid beetles in abundance, and I don't think my multiplier is anywhere close to 10x on my sugar apple. On my Gefner atemoya though, fruit set is easily 6x, possibly as high as 10x with hand pollination.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Adam Shafran?
« on: May 11, 2017, 06:53:37 PM »
Adam is a super nice guy.  I drove up there for other business, and he took the time out to meet with me; and we got a chance to tour the orchard until the rain decided to wash the pitangatuba juices off of us.

Now, I don't recommend just showing up, as we had been trying to connect for over a year--but both our schedules suck.

I had the honor of picking out some nice specimens, and took a gander at his in ground red jabos.  Superb.

It is my understanding he has started another business as well, so the orchard may not be his only endeavor anymore.

Being a one man show is tough, so just be patient.  Sometimes a break is just needed from it all, and his prices are too low for the effort.  I highly suggest anyone who can to offer him more (tip if you want to call it) for whatever you buy and make it worth his time.

He is highly knowledgeable.and has a good thing going with FFF.

Adam is a really nice guy, and was a great host to us when we visited a while back. FFF is a great business, and I'd buy stuff from him again in a heartbeat.

Regarding the other business, the troll in me hopes his other business is a local business totally unrelated to tropical fruit, and the phone number gets regular calls from fruit nuts trying to track down a jaboticaba.  ;D

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugar apple pollination experiment
« on: May 11, 2017, 09:53:55 AM »
I figured the day would come when my sugar apples would be too large to hand pollinate, so this year with them both getting rather tall, I stopped doing it by hand. The first two branches I watched closely had 7 flowers on them and as the dead flowers fell two stuck and the two little fruits are developing nicely. Coincidentally this is about the same rate of fruiting as I got with hand pollination over the last few years.

Granted it's only a few flowers, but as I watch them I hope that I see similar results over the next few weeks. Has anyone else left their sugar apples alone and watched them for fruit development?

My money would be on the difference being the % of large symmetrical fruit, not so much the % fruit set overall. I'm interested to see what other folks experience has been. There's a local grower here in SWFL with a few acres of sugar apples. He doesn't do any hand pollination that I know of, and his trees set about as well as mine does with hand pollination. My tree is a seedling from one of his and is pretty well identical in fruit appearance and quality. I definitely got larger fruit on average than I saw at his place.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugar apple pollination experiment
« on: May 11, 2017, 09:29:59 AM »
Not a hijack but quick sidenote...i currently have lots of flowers at the same female stage this morning..and very little pollen collected to hand pollinate... there's a row of pond apples with plenty flowers by the canal near me..can  i collect pollen for hand pollinating the sugar apple?

You can try, but they're not likely to take since pond apple is more closely related to soursop than sugar apple. If they did, there'd be a good chance of your sugar apples tasting less than desirable because of pseudo-xenic effects seen in annonas, which means the pollen source can change the quality of the fruit.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Please help identify this tree
« on: May 07, 2017, 04:56:30 PM »
It looks like a strawberry guava( psidium cattleianum) but a close up of the fruit and leaves would be easier to identify. It looks like it has fruit
on it now? Take a close up of the plant in the pot as well.

I'll second that; it looks like strawberry guava to me too.

10
Personally I'm not convinced Dream is a true cherimoya, but rather a really good atemoya. That said I do have a few available grafted on either cherimoya or custard apple ( A. reticulata) rootstock in 1gal for $25 each. Shipping $15.

11
Ray, does Otto live up to the hype? How does it taste compared to other Jabos?

It's beyond a doubt the best tasting jabuticaba by far. It has a unique taste unlike any other and has a thin skin as a bonus and that's also sweet. Imagine all the flavors of  fruit loop cereal. That's as close as I can come to describing. I've never eaten a jabo as delicious.

I can confirm what Ray says, it is indeed the best jaboticaba I've had yet, among sabara, red and grimal. The froot loops description works, I can't come up with a better one.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Rollinia... yum
« on: April 28, 2017, 08:21:45 AM »
Nice size tree and fruit!  How many fruit were on that tree?  Was the fruit firm or snotty? I understand Rollinia are shy bloomers and low in fruit production. I am only asking because I'd like to hear other peoples experiences. I have a small tree and know that attempting to get it to bloom well, let alone fruit will be difficult in my climate. I think I see several flowers on my tree growing in now with the new growth, but only time will tell.
That has not been my experience, though rollinia does do better in a humid climate like we have here. Mine is flowering heavily now, and generally sets fruit well on its own.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Tropic Beauty Peaches almost ready?
« on: April 26, 2017, 10:49:05 PM »
Look at the top where the stem connects. When the green color there disappears and turns to yellow or orange you're good to pick, even if it isn't soft yet.

14
Not sure on the wax jambu, but with annonas the idea is you generally prune back last season's growth by roughly a third, and strip off old leaves at about the time when temps are favorable for new growth. They will push new growth and drop the old leaves on their own, but pruning and stripping leaves can get that new growth happening sooner.

I know a peach grower that chemically defoliates by basically chemically burning the leaves with...I think it was ZnS04, but it could have been some other fertilizer spray. I imagine the same approach could be done with annonas, though I haven't seen any documentation of growers doing so.

15
There isn't much out there that will produce a shade tree as fast as a Muntingia calabura.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugar apple hand pollenate issue
« on: April 20, 2017, 12:27:45 AM »
Does these look like successful hand pollination ?


Too early to definitively say, but the stems still look thick and green, and there's good coloration on the part (carpels I think is the term) that would become the fruit. The early signs of fruit set for me are enlargement of the carpels and the stem remaining firmly attached 24+ hours after pollen drop.  If me and a buddy were betting $5, I'd go with them being set, but at $10 I might not take that bet.

Here's a Dream atemoya that I'd bet $20 is fruit set.


17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugar apple hand pollenate issue
« on: April 19, 2017, 11:32:10 AM »
So once you pollenate the female flower . Does the female flower still turn into a male flower  when fully open and can I still collect pollen from iit?

Yes.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugar apple hand pollenate issue
« on: April 19, 2017, 08:54:21 AM »

So I took one of the dried out flower and shake it over a container . So is this pollen?


Those are anthers, the things the pollen falls from. The pollen itself is a very fine yellow/white powder. If you're just getting anthers and no pollen, you need to collect pollen earlier in the day. Here in SWFL my atemoyas open in the male stage at about 5:30 give or take.

A black or darkly colored container is preferred for pollen collection because it allows you to more easily see the actual pollen.

I'd also add that for my sugar apples, the first flowers it pushes out are super tiny (maybe 1/2" long) and don't really seem to set fruit or give much pollen. I usually ignore those until I see flowers about 1" long or more.

19
In my book a good sugar apple (A. squamosa) is absolutely worth growing, its just that most atemoyas are going to be better, and proper cherimoyas (A cherimola) will be better still. I might have some McPherson cherimoya fruit set down here in SWFL, keep your fingers crossed for me that they hold to maturity. ;-)

For custard apple (A. reticulata), I'm a fan of them because they bear in the spring when most sugar apples and atemoya aren't holding fruit here in Florida. If I could grow atemoya year round though, I probably wouldn't grow any custard apples. That said they're a good fruit in their own right that bears when many others don't, so I'll try and find the best custard apples I can to keep me eating annonas as close to year round as possible.

For my tastes even the lowly Gefner atemoya is still a great fruit for Florida, ranking above many other things we can grow here. Lisa is hands down a better fruit, as is Dream, but I'd still eat Gefner all day long.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugar apple hand pollenate issue
« on: April 18, 2017, 10:40:24 PM »
On this topic, and speaking of youtube videos, I was studying one about hand pollination of cherimoya that talked about humid vs dry climates, stating that in humid climates you don't need to hand pollinate. I thought it had to do with there being or not being pollinators that do their thing with these flowers. I don't get how the humidity can make the difference. Can someone explain?
The difference is in humid climates the female part of the flower stays wet, and therefore receptive to pollen, for a longer period. The pollinators can be there in both cases, but in a humid climate you extend the receptive window, which means a higher chance of successful pollination.

Either way, the prudent annona grower absolutely should hand pollinate because it means better fruit set and larger fruit.

21
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Sale: anona scions
« on: April 18, 2017, 02:05:53 PM »
    Ok . I am anxiously waiting LOL .  Oh BTW I was at Exotica last Monday and they had a 15 gallon " White Ilama "  I had not heard of a white Ilama so I hesitated to buy it. Have you ever heard of one ? It was grafted but Leo didn't seem to have any info on it.


 William

Those exotica so call white ilamas are atemoyas I wish Steve stop calling white ilamas

I'm going to start naming atemoya varieties different colors of Llama. "No, not I-lama, L-lama! Yes, the plant is called blue llama atemoya!"
Oh great - more confusion!  What about the other llama relatives (Alpaca, Guanaco, and Vicuņa) they could be contenders.  ;D
 

Lol, that's an even better idea! Any I-lama varieties get named after L-lama relatives!

22
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Sale: anona scions
« on: April 18, 2017, 12:20:06 PM »
    Ok . I am anxiously waiting LOL .  Oh BTW I was at Exotica last Monday and they had a 15 gallon " White Ilama "  I had not heard of a white Ilama so I hesitated to buy it. Have you ever heard of one ? It was grafted but Leo didn't seem to have any info on it.


 William

Those exotica so call white ilamas are atemoyas I wish Steve stop calling white ilamas

I'm going to start naming atemoya varieties different colors of Llama. "No, not I-lama, L-lama! Yes, the plant is called blue llama atemoya!"

23
You sure what you bought locally is a cherimoya and not chirimoya?  I dont know many SFla cherimoya growers or nurseries selling cherimoyas.  Was there a variety name on it or is it a seedling?  Custard apple,  which some call churimoya, do fine here but us in no way similar or comparable to a cherimoya.

Yup, I confirmed it is Chirimoya.  What is the difference. Hard for me to find any info online.  Keeps referring me to Cherimoya.  Any photo links or information links on the tree, fruit, quality, etc. would be awesome. I planted it about 1 year ago, it dropped its leaves during winter and now has new growth everywhere.  Its about 7Ft tall or so, but not the loveliest looking thing if you know what I mean.
[/quote]

Chirimoya = Annona reticulata AKA Custard apple.

24
That looks like it had a branch there that died back, and a new shoot grew just below that. I'd say not grafted.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Bark Grafting Mango
« on: April 08, 2017, 08:10:16 AM »
I helped a local grower do some bark grafting on a few older nonproductive trees he had already stumped. Neither of us had done it before but I'm pretty sure he said he got most of them to take. We basically did it just like the video in the OP, except we used grafting wax to seal things up instead of mud. Once mango season starts up again I'll get some pictures.

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