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Messages - Millet

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1
Winter prebloom foliar spray application of low Biuret urea is known to greatly increase flower number, thus greater crop yield.  Proper timing is important to achieve the desired outcome.  Winter prebloom sprays are designed to increase flower number and fruit yield without reducing fruit size. Winter prebloom foliar sprays with low biuret urea (46-0-0 >0.5% biuret) is applied at the rate of .44-lbs. (200-grams) in 2 gallon of water plus one teaspoon of a good surfactant per gallon.. For large area (acres) sprays 50-lbs. per 225 gallons water.

2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Lemon Tree
« on: Today at 11:31:09 AM »
There is not anything you can do now.  You must wait until spring to ascertain what damage has been done.   Good things often come to those who wait.

3
Citradia,, I thought  you were using heat cubes also.

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: What kind of Pomelo is this?
« on: January 13, 2018, 05:05:42 PM »
Below is an Pummello article written by Dan Willey.  It is just one of the many educational articles that he publishes on his web site FRUIT MENTOR.  Dan is a real friend of he citrus industry. This article provides excellent information on pummelo varieties and their requirements.

http://www.fruitmentor.com/californiapummelos

5
Citradia, when the going gets tough, the tough get going.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: HLB Getting Worse in California
« on: January 13, 2018, 11:41:20 AM »
arc310, in your post the photo asks residence to report any possible sightings of HLB to the California authorities.  In Matt-citrus post  he did just that, and they as of yet never came out, nor would they do the work, but rather ask him to do all the leg work. Whats that??

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: What kind of Pomelo is this?
« on: January 12, 2018, 03:37:22 PM »
Loisport, i do not know the answer to your questions.  If Oscar is selling it, it must be a good variety.   You can contact Tintorri and ask them for information.

8
Citrus General Discussion / Re: If You Live In California
« on: January 12, 2018, 10:40:46 AM »
here is another specially citrus picked off of 100 year old California citrus trees.
http://www.freshplaza.com/article/187685/California-specialty-citrus-brand-sees-increase-in-sales

9
Citrus General Discussion / Re: What kind of Pomelo is this?
« on: January 12, 2018, 10:32:59 AM »
It is called Frutto Rosa.  You can see it on Oscar Tintorri's home page.

https://www.oscartintori.it/categoria-prodotto/serra-degli-agrumi/serra-degli-agrumi-pummeli-citrus-grandis/

11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Snek ́s citrus container plantation
« on: January 11, 2018, 12:20:15 PM »
From the symptoms shown in the photos by Mtlgirl and Snek the problem does not look like Greasy Spot.    I'm not certain what it is, but also I don't think it is edema, as edema damaged leaves normally do not fall from the tree.  If it is a fungus, applying an effective fungicide normally stops the infection, but of course does not remove the leaf damage already done.                                             

12
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Accuracy of cold hardiness temperatures?
« on: January 10, 2018, 12:33:33 PM »
At best the information on temperatures that a citrus cultivar can survive are general estimations.  Many, many variables contribute to the survive-ability during a cold spell.  Such as----the temperature just before the cold spell, the water content in the root zone, the age of the tree, the thickness of the trunk and branches, the wind, the length of the freeze, the health of the tree, the root stock, and the particular location the tree is growing in.    Grapefruit is generally listed as one of the more tender varieties, but one hears stories of the Dunstan grapefruit, which in reality is not an actual grapefruit, but rather a Citrumelo.

13
Adrino, water with temperatures between  70 to 90F (21 to 30C)

14
When leaves are discarded form a citrus tree, due to WLD (Winter Leaf Drop), they are normally healthy green good looking leaves.

15
Citrus General Discussion / Re: My first Kishu mandarin harvest
« on: January 07, 2018, 10:54:14 PM »
Congratulations, good things come to those who wait.  Kishu is a favorite of many people.  The best to you and this tree.

17
With low night temperatures, and higher day temperatures your trees will still get a bloom, however the tree will have both a smaller number of floral shoots and flowers per shoot.   In areas such as Florida and other semitropical and tropical citrus growing areas, winter water deficit stress is imposed on citrus trees of all cultivars to compensate or inadequate exposure to low temperatures during their mild winters.   One last note: citrus are day neutral, meaning that day length does not induce flowering as it does in many annual and biennial plants.

18
To induce a very good flowering  in citrus  ---- 2 weeks at night temperatures between 50 to 55 F, and day temperatures between 59  to 65 F.

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Range of ACP
« on: January 05, 2018, 09:14:35 PM »
Below is a link showing a map where the psyllid has been spotted.
https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/18615


20
A Minneola tangelo has such a great taste, I think crossing it with a chandler would result in an inferior fruit ---- but you never know.

21
adriano,  what you wrote above about the sunlight and temperatures of your container citrus is a problem   The link shown below which was posted earlier on another post by Isaac-1 should be a big help to your problem.
http://www.crec.ifas.ufl.edu/extension/trade_journals/2011/2011_Nov_root_temp.pdf

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cleopatra as rootstock
« on: January 05, 2018, 03:13:28 PM »
Mtlgirl, I have not heard of a 10 year decline when using Cleopatra as a rootstock.  There can be rootstock declines that happen when grafted  upon a certain cultivar, but that does not mean that it occurs when grafted upon a different variety.   A rootstock might have a decline with one citrus type, but do fine on other cultivars.

23
Organic fertilizers are fine for outside in the garden, but do not work well in containers.  In order for organic fertilizers to release there nutrients, they have to be first broken down by the soil microbes to become available to the tree.  Garden soils are teaming with all sorts of microbes, but not so in container mediums.  Also, if the foliage of your container plants is receiving direct sunlight, then be sure that the container itself is also receiving the same sunlight light.  Do you have a soil thermometer?  What is the temperature of the container's medium?

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Cleopatra as rootstock
« on: January 04, 2018, 09:33:20 PM »
Cleopatra rootstock has a reputation for producing good yields of high quality tangerine types ( C. reticulata and some hybrids) and tangelos
( C. paradisi x C. reticulata)

25
adriano, nice seeing you on the forum again.   Discouraging when container tree lose their leaves (commonalty known as WLD).  However, I doubt that the cause is the poncirus rootstock  I have many container citrus growing on poncirus rootstocks (Flying Dragon), and they all keep their leaves all winter long.

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