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Messages - fruitlovers

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1
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Define "dappled shade"...
« on: January 19, 2018, 09:46:54 PM »
It's not a question of "they", it's a question of "us".   :)  When reading cultivation descriptions written by others, we need to know how to interpret them.
Yes, i think a lot of people burn their plants because 1 hour of sun is very different from 4 hours of sun.
You can't delete, but you can hit modify and remove all the text and leave it blank.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Define "dappled shade"...
« on: January 19, 2018, 09:45:43 PM »
It's not a question of "they", it's a question of "us".   :)  When reading cultivation descriptions written by others, we need to know how to interpret them.
Yes, i think a lot of people burn their plants because 1 hour of sun is very different from 4 hours of sun.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Define "dappled shade"...
« on: January 19, 2018, 05:43:19 PM »
Okay, interesting.  So it looks like I should break "light shade" off from the pack, and merge "dappled shade" in with "part shade".
None of these are really precise terms. So it would be good to also give a little further explanation, just so they know exactly what you mean.

4
So it would be a sugar apple crossed with an atemoya (which itself is A. squamosa x A. cherimola), making it 75% squamosa and 25% cherimola, but still called an atemoya.  Right?
No. I think what they mean by Annona X is atemoya which = Cherimoya crossed with sugar apple.
What you are suggesting would be a double cross.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: 2018 Lychee Bloom
« on: January 19, 2018, 12:53:15 AM »
Notice Sweetheart blooming here as well right now.

6
x means crossed, or hybrid. So yes, it just means atemoya (a cross of cherimoya with sugar apple).

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fermenting tropical fruits into alcohol
« on: January 18, 2018, 04:55:30 PM »
I've only tried making a jaboticaba liqueur. It was super easy as it just involved letting the jaboticabas sit in pure grain alcohol for a long time. It was extra ordinarily good. I'm not real big on alcoholic drinks, but would definitely try that one again!

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Define "dappled shade"...
« on: January 18, 2018, 04:48:24 PM »
Dappled shade = filtered sunlight. The kind of condition that you get when you use shade cloth. That is very different from full shade, where no sun shines through, or partial shade, where you may have shade for x number of hours and sun for x number of hours.

Wouldn't there be different levels of "dappled shade"...  like 30%, 50%, 70%, etc.?

Yes definitely. I prefer to use the term filtered sunlight. And when giving recommendation give the exact type of shade cloth to use. When you go over 85% shade cloth you start getting close to full shade. When using less than 30% shade cloth you get close to what is called partial shade. Depending on the climate, intensity of sun, exposure, the usual ideal for what is usually referred to filtered sunlight is 50 to 65% shade cloth.

9
Since Ficus hedges don't normally get to flower around here, treating them with Imidacloprid is unlikely to harm bees, so long as no flowering plant's roots are also there.

Coconuts flower throughout the year and are heavily visited by bees.   Treating Coconuts with Imidacloprid or Safari is likely going to kill many bee babies.

I will be mostly treating the ficus hedge and 3 coconut palms. The palms were recently trimmed by the arborists that maintain the trees here in my neighborhood so there are no flowering parts left on the trees. I could easily cut off any emerging flowering 'branches' on the palms and snip off any emerging flowers from other fruit trees to protect the bees.

The question I am considering is whether 4 months after the application the imidacloprid could it found in mangoes next year after the flowers begin to emerge in February/March and will the bees be killed that long after ?
I am not sure what actual studies have been done but since application are said to be good for six months.  On the other hand, bees do not feed on mango flowers.

Hi Rob, Sorry that wasn't clear it was two separate thoughts:
Would  mangoes have levels of the imidacloprid that could be harmful (I know they are pollinated by flies ect)
And would the bees be harmed 5-6 months later ? (As I would removed my citrus blooms during that time frame if needed)

I know this is an old post,  but wanted to respond to this, question,  since I have been doing research on imidacloprid , which I recently purchased for my wife, and her ornamental plants.  of the commercial insecticides, it seemed to be on the lower end of the toxicity spectrum for humans.   

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23196371       this study has found that 85 days after a spray, there is no residuals in the fruit.    so it seems to me that,  the best way to use this insecticide ( if one really needs it ) is right after the tree has flowered,  this will protect the bees.  and should be completely out of its system by the time fruits are ready to pick.   I used a little drench on one potted mango tree with scale.   and another Avocado with white flies.  as a test.

anyone have any other experiences to add here?
Can you clarify? Haven't read the study yet. But imidacloprid is usually used as a soil drench. And here you say 85 days after spraying? It would seem to me that as a systemic drench it would stay inside the whole plant, not just the fruit, for a lot longer than 85 days?

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Define "dappled shade"...
« on: January 18, 2018, 05:56:24 AM »
Dappled shade = filtered sunlight. The kind of condition that you get when you use shade cloth. That is very different from full shade, where no sun shines through, or partial shade, where you may have shade for x number of hours and sun for x number of hours.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Any ideas what kind of fruit this is?
« on: January 17, 2018, 04:19:32 AM »
It is Pachira glabra, malabar chestnut, or French peanut. Yes seeds are edible raw, sprouted or cooked.
Pachira insignis has brown pods and red flowers. Pachira glabra has green pods and white flowers.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit with interesting stories behind it?
« on: January 13, 2018, 09:24:13 PM »
Probably one of the most infamous is the breadfruit, which led to the Mutiny on the Bounty book and movies, of which several movie versions were made, and none mentions the breadfruit. Funny that instead the ackee carries captain Bligh's name, Blighia sapida, and not the breadfruit.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pedalai in Hawaii
« on: January 12, 2018, 01:14:05 AM »
Don't have any right now. Have one tree in the ground, but has not fruited yet.  They get really giant, as in 150 feet tall! So it's good to top them when about 10 feet tall and keep them pruned. Otherwise you will never reach the fruits.

14
One thing that is not mentioned frequently enough is that avocados increase in richness when left on the tree an extra long time. I discovered this when I tasted some Hass from my tree that was hanging about 18 months. The butter factor was so high, it was like I was eating a Reed or some Hawaiian avocado.
Yes, type of cultivar is only one factor affecting taste and oil content. Fruits should be left on until at least until after the fruits are no longer glossy. Other things also affect taste, like soil type, fertilizer, amount of sun exposure, climate, etc. So it's not really completely fair to compare quality of different cultivars, unless they came from the same farm, and had same growing conditions.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: what is it ?
« on: January 10, 2018, 06:17:36 AM »
It's possible. Take a close up photo of seeds and leaves to ID for sure.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Dwarf(ed) nutmeg?
« on: January 08, 2018, 05:48:42 PM »
No dwarfs that i know of. But they can be airlayered and that would make the plant start bearing while still very short and dwarf it to some extent. Getting that material would be extremely difficult though.

The budget being looked at for the facility is significant, to the point of considering the import of whole sizeable trees where available. I'll put this down as a "maybe" to discuss (in the last meeting there was a big push for spice trees, so this obviously comes up as a possibility to research).  Obviously most of the things on the list won't make it in; right now it's about assembling the possibilities, in order to figure out how to prioritize what goes where.  Thanks  :)
Very large budget is not going to help you much, unless they are willing to fly you somewhere to dig out the trees yourself and charter a plane to return them. Even getting viable nutmeg seeds is very hard. You will see what i mean if you try to get some. Sorry to be the spoiler on all of your ideas. I am all for pushing the limits. But i think this really goes beyond the usual "pushing the limits". But i would love it if you proved me wrong. If you can do it i would travel to Iceland to witness your miracle..

17
While it doesn't look like they'll work for us, congratulations on getting some.  That's a nice investment for future generations that you're making.  :)
Fed Ex screwed it up. The shipment was delayed by them and the sprouting nuts arrived DOA. Enough to make a grown man cry!!!

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Any duguetias worth cultivating?
« on: January 08, 2018, 05:19:47 PM »
.Seeds are hard to get, hard to sprout, and plants very slow growing. I think the fruits are worthwhile, but at your location i think it would be easier to turn straw into gold. But if you like performing miracles, go for it.

Well, we can give them whatever soil they want, with controlled weather conditions, both temperature and humidity. Light isn't as free-form, but will be winter supplemented.  Slow-growing plants can be kept in the prep area until they reach a desirable size, so long as the layout is designed such that a space will be opening up for them at the right time.  But for that to happen, I'm trying to figure out if they're worth the space.

My hunch, from what I've heard, is that they're probably not.
They're difficult to get to fruit even here in Hawaii. I think you are really shooting for the sky lately, as with nutmeg and double coconut. Getting durian and mangosteen to fruit in Iceland might be easier than these species you are considering now.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Dwarf(ed) nutmeg?
« on: January 08, 2018, 05:15:50 PM »
No dwarfs that i know of. But they can be airlayered and that would make the plant start bearing while still very short and dwarf it to some extent. Getting that material would be extremely difficult though.

20
I was able to get some a few years ago. I think your only chance of getting them now would be to travel to Seychelles to pick them up. Even so it would be hard and require advance planning and getting the proper government permits.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Any duguetias worth cultivating?
« on: January 08, 2018, 05:07:05 PM »
.Seeds are hard to get, hard to sprout, and plants very slow growing. I think the fruits are worthwhile, but at your location i think it would be easier to turn straw into gold. But if you like performing miracles, go for it.

22
Temps plummeted at my place with 79f min to 90f max today after 3 inches of rain so there is a chill in the air.Now at 7.50pm it is a brisk 85f but the temp relief wasn't matched by a humidity relief. Did I say that Oscar? I was younger then if it was me. The entire Ocean around northern Australia seems to be 30c to 32c (sorry for lapsing back to metric) at the moment.
 Even southern Australians are complaining at the moment. Tomorrow will be warmish even on the coast.
Sydney
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40
Penrith West Sydney
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Sydney has no humidity so that is chicken feed. They have no right to complain unless it is over 50c
No it was not you Mike that said that AC was for sissys. It was another Aussie. It was several years ago before the temperatures down under went soaring. He only posted a few times, so i forget his addy. Wonder if he survived his own experiment, moved to Tasmania, or succumbed and bought an AC? The temperatures you quote are insanely high.

23
Yes rating avocados is subjective. But then again rating the quality of any fruit (or food) is subjective. Still if you look at a list of people's favorites the same names will come up on the top over and over again.
Keep in mind though that the favorite cultivars of commercial growers does not have much to do with what is people's favorites. They choose mostly based on productivity, shelf life, uniformity, looks, disease resistance. Taste is only one small component for them. A lot of people wrongly assume that because a certain cultivar is the most widely grown that it must have the best quality, in terms of taste.We know this is not true with Tommy Atkins avocado, or Red Delicious apples (the old top selling cultivar), and i don't think it's true with Hass either. But it's not surprising when there are so many hundreds of cultivars of avocados.
The fuerte was the top commercially grown avocado for a long time before it was supplanted by Hass. There is evolution even in the Hass. They just keep calling it by the same name even though the trees are different than the Hass from decades ago, . This is just because the name is so implanted by now in people's minds and the marketers don't want to move on to a different name. Remarketing under a new name costs money and time to get consumer approval.

24
How is Greengold, which is a seedling of Sharwil?  Carlos was growing it, but we haven't heard from him since Hurricane Irma, which did a lot of damage to (devastated?) his grove.  It seemed like it might have potential for Florida.  Otherwise, what's the BEST TASTING AVOCADO FOR FLORIDA?  Pinkerton?
Green gold is quite good...similar in quality to Sharwil.

25
Like Oscar I am a bit hot and wet for mangoes except a few varieties, For the last week my temps were 95 to 98f with minimums in the 80's.The humidity has been extraordinary with the air like syrup. People without aircons at night must be like starfish under the fan in pools of sweat. The term for tropical heat with heavy humidity induced madness is 'going troppo'.
I would kill to feel some of that US cool weather at the moment.
Remember the Aussie who used to post that air conditioning was for sissys? Wonder what happened to him? Is he still alive?

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