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Messages - fruitlovers

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1
Had similar problems here with chempadek. Some would die off, and the ones that survived looked chlorotic for a while. They would grow out of that once they get a few feet high. Last summer i had a tree that pumped out massive amounts of fruit on the first fruiting.  See photo at http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=21383.msg261264#msg261264 Another 2 trees, same size, about 8 feet, didn't make a single fruit. In any case, it's a delicious fruit worth persevering the difficulties it puts you through. I think that Peter's suggestion of having soil microrganisms in the medium is a good one. At very least use compost or earth worm casings in the medium. Also as Mike points out, some cultivars seem more troublesome than others, so just keep trying...persevere.

2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What is the best lychee?
« on: Today at 12:34:45 AM »
I should have been more  specific in florida they have been calling Fay Zee Siu ,hakip  and now Sweetheart  the wrong name for 50+ years .My crop was 25 % best tree 300lbs best tree and worst zero average maybe 50lbs.

Not sure where you get that information. Sweetheart is a rather recent introduction. There are previous threads detailing origin of Sweetheart from Australia. It's an invented name for a plant that the person who brought material over lost the tag for.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What is the best lychee?
« on: June 24, 2017, 05:21:41 AM »
A bunch of factors go into lychee flowering.

Some factors associated with improved chances of flowering:
- cold weather
- drought treatment BEFORE cold weather
- maturity of shoots

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4997319/#b5

Most science/experience seems to be that the cold is a requirement that has no substitute, and that all the other things we try to do are secondary to the cold requirement.
Lychees frut here where temperatures never dip below 60F. So obviously there are some cultivars that can fruit without any cold at all. Really no lychee needs cold, but rather cool weather. Even the cultivars that are most in need of cool weather only need temperatures below 55F during winter. I would not call that cold. Most places on continental USA should have no problem meeting that requirement, except perhaps southern Florida during warmer years.
The need some lychee cultivars have for cool weather is in order to stress the trees to initiate flowering. It's easy to confuse this with the need that temperate fruit trees have for real cold weather, below 45F, to initiate leaf drop and dormancy.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Edwards Mango from Oscar
« on: June 22, 2017, 04:06:14 AM »
Thanks Berns. Glad you got it to fruit.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: heat woes
« on: June 21, 2017, 07:53:53 PM »
Grafted plants, especially recently grafted ones, are like post surgery patients: quite delicate.
Soil temperatures of in ground plants is going to be a whole lot lower than air temperatures. Potted plants are going to have temperatures in soil medium equal to, and sometimes even higher, if in black pots, than air temperatures.

6
Jaboticaba seeds are irregular in shape and when you peel outer pulp they are purple colored. Your seeds are not jaboticaba. The photo Luc posted looks more like jaboticaba, but it a different species so a bit different than regular jaboticaba seeds.

7
Temperate Fruit Buy, Sell, & Trade / Re: Looking for gotu kola.
« on: June 20, 2017, 07:59:34 PM »
I have huge patches of Gotu Kola. Does it make a seed?
Does it grow wild there? Grows wild here.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Kauai White Sugarloaf Pineapples
« on: June 20, 2017, 03:54:46 AM »
The Kuai White Sugarloaf are so good but so darn expensive, another reason to grow your own. They are a bit cheaper when you buy three and you save on shipping costs. I hope to have enough White Sugarloaf and White Jade so that I will be able to harvest one fruit a month.

The taste of the White Sugarloaf is creamy and candy like and it does have just enough acidity to balance out the sugars.

Simon

They are only expensive where you live. They cost $4 or $5 each here depending on size.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sweetest pineapple?
« on: June 17, 2017, 03:30:24 AM »
I just cut open the Maui Gold and it was very bad. It was not sweet at all. It had a Brix of 13% and was very bland and had almost no pineapple flavor. To top it off the core was very fibrous so I would consider it non edible.

I'm hoping I just got a really bad fruit. I bet the fruit ordered online is much higher quality.



Simon
Yeah, you got a bad fruit.

Thanks for the input Oscar, I trust your knowledge. Now I'm curious how good a good Maui Gold can get? I'm very tempted to buy the $30 pineapple to find out but I can't stop thinking about the White Sugarloafs from Jude.

Evildeadguy, I completely agree with your statement. Although I would love to try the Meli Kalima, it would not be worth the effort for me because even if it turned out to be the the best tasting pineapple, I would knot be able to grow it.

Mark, I can't wait till you get your White Sugarloaf, did you order fruit or just the plants?

I recently re read one of the White Jade threads and someone, I believe it was Adam, mentioned that the White Jade is like the Sugarloaf but better! I should find out by next year.

Simon
Maui Gold is good, but not excellent like white Sugarloaf.

10
Don't cold tolerant mangoes already exist? According to Dr. Campbell, and some members of this forum, any species of mangifera, and there are many, can be called a "wild mango". I don't personally agree with that, but if it's true then cold tolerant wild mangoes already exist. There are species of mangifera that naturally occur at higher elevations. They may not be tolerant to frost, but they are going to be more cold tolerant then regular mango.
It seems to me that it would be a LOT easier to hybridize some of these species with regular mango than to select from 10,000 seedling mangoes over 2 generations of out growing.


My point is I think it is possible.  I've seen 3 gal in ground mango trees survive down to 28F without significant damage.  This wasn't "special" cold tolerant trees, but cold preparation ahead of the freeze, such as irrigation a few days before the cold to trap in warmth.  Other factors, such as a short cold snap, no wind, etc. helped the trees.

I think the "wild mango" has rootstock compatibility issues; Fairchild had to double graft with an internode species to get surviving.

First of all  i wasn't talking about using cold hardy rootstock, but rather about hybridizing (using pollen from one species onto another). Also the problem Fairchild's had with root compatibility was on using regular rootstock mango to graft on Wani (Mangifera caesia) scions. Those 2 are incompatible, but i believe that most species are compatible, and that the exceptions are few. For example, kuini (Mangifera odorata) and kasturi (Mangifera kasturi) are compatible with mango, and even those 2 species are found at higher elevations than mango. So probably some cold hardiness could be developed, the only question is how significant the cold hardiness would be?

11
Don't cold tolerant mangoes already exist? According to Dr. Campbell, and some members of this forum, any species of mangifera, and there are many, can be called a "wild mango". I don't personally agree with that, but if it's true then cold tolerant wild mangoes already exist. There are species of mangifera that naturally occur at higher elevations. They may not be tolerant to frost, but they are going to be more cold tolerant then regular mango.
It seems to me that it would be a LOT easier to hybridize some of these species with regular mango than to select from 10,000 seedling mangoes over 2 generations of out growing.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Kauai White Sugarloaf Pineapples
« on: June 15, 2017, 05:50:39 PM »
I just received a shipment of pineapples from jude. How long can they last? Can I keep it in the refrigerator for a week?

The thing about White Sugarloaf is that they don't have a long Shelf life the sooner you eat it the better but I'm sure you can wait a few days but i wouldn't take any longer than that
They keep fine, especially when picked before fully ripe, as most shippers do.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sweetest pineapple?
« on: June 15, 2017, 05:38:00 PM »
I just cut open the Maui Gold and it was very bad. It was not sweet at all. It had a Brix of 13% and was very bland and had almost no pineapple flavor. To top it off the core was very fibrous so I would consider it non edible.

I'm hoping I just got a really bad fruit. I bet the fruit ordered online is much higher quality.



Simon
Yeah, you got a bad fruit.

14
Turn a bit yellowish and start to split.

15
I've never seen any poster give their location as Bali. But many people travel to Bali on holiday, especially Australians.

16
Might be easier to get someone in India to do it. Lots of carvings there out of mango wood, also sandalwood.

18
Can you try to find out species name?

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Think Ive been had.
« on: May 31, 2017, 06:41:30 AM »
Casimoroa seeds are white on exterior and fairly smooth. Mammee apple seeds are huge, about 4x as big as casimoroa, flattened shape, ruffled on exterior, and brown.

20
Pretty good article about this plant in wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alangium_salviifolium

21
OK, thanks for the info. Have plants both in full sun and partial shade to see which ones do better.

22
Glad you all are enjoying the videos. Was a bit of a challenge for me, having never done that before. I wish the slides could be seen better, but the presentation was outdoors, not a good location, with all the outdoor lighting peeking through. Also my better video camera failed to work. Fortunately i had a backup camera, but color quality is not as good with that camera. Was a real learning experience. So far i've been much more into photos than videos.
There is an incredible diversity of plants and fruits in nature, and listening to Jim's presentation helps us to make us more aware of that. I got lots of seeds from Jim, and hopefully will be adding them to my offerings in the years to come.

23

This tree has gotten massive and produced well in 5 years time. But have yet to taste the fruits. Waiting for them to perfectly ripen.

Can you ship scions of this abroad?
Yes can send you scions. PM me for more info.

24
Really nice looking tree can't wait to hear taste report! Any guess to possible cold hardiness? 8)
Don't know, but would guess it is more cold hardy than avocado since chucte originates in highlands. Look at first posting on this thread, there is a link there. Any info on cold hardiness there?

25
Haven't tried it, but my guess, based on fact that cacao is propagated from cuttings, is yes you can. But you will have to use rooting hormone, shadecloth, and misting system.

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