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Messages - Florian

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1
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Yuzu... my new obsession!
« on: Today at 12:38:55 AM »
I'd sure love to have a dekopon seed or two too, Millet :D.

2
Thanks for the clarification, the fruit looks quite nice.

3
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Yuzu... my new obsession!
« on: November 21, 2017, 04:36:23 AM »
The seedless Yuzu or Nishiki (tada) is extremely hard to find outside of Japan - as are the true Yuko and Sudachi - and it seems to me that most people in Europe who have either of them are not very keen on sharing.. :-\  You could also try Kabosu (C. sphaerocarpa) which is currently available from Adavo and is also used in cuisine.
Thank's a lot for your tips! What do you think about this one? I'm thinking to buy this one: http://www.citrusandlife.com/en/nursery/51-yuzu.html
Do you know another better variety of yuzu with more juice and less seeds? Thank's!  ;D

I have never ordered there, since they only ship to EU countries but it looks ok.

Mind you much of what I write here is not personal experience. I only have Hana Yuzu.
Ichang lemon has more juice than Yuzu but, of course, it is not a Yuzu. I think it is still worth a try. Hana Yuzu has fewer seeds than the normal one but also smaller fruit and the fragrance is less powerful. The seedless Yuzu would be best but it is almost impossible to find.

Check out this link with a lot of information about different Yuzu types: http://forum-agrumes.com/viewtopic.php?f=53&t=41&sid=7cbbc5468736366e413e2a79d67ccd9c

4
Thanks for the pictures. What excatly is the Sitsuma?

5
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Yuzu... my new obsession!
« on: November 19, 2017, 08:54:18 AM »
The seedless Yuzu or Nishiki (tada) is extremely hard to find outside of Japan - as are the true Yuko and Sudachi - and it seems to me that most people in Europe who have either of them are not very keen on sharing.. :-\  You could also try Kabosu (C. sphaerocarpa) which is currently available from Adavo and is also used in cuisine.

6
Fantastic plants, Snek, and they look very healthy in containers. What is your secret?

7
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Clementino Rubino
« on: October 12, 2017, 01:19:12 PM »
Actually, I didn't know it and had never seen it before, Susanne. I just noticed the Agrumi Lenzi link and instantly wanted to have one! Our country's only specialist nursery (Eisenhut) doesn't currently stock it.
I was surprised to find the tag on it, so it can't be too rare..

8
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Clementino Rubino
« on: October 09, 2017, 04:48:02 AM »
And here's my little guy. I hope it flowers next year.


9
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Clementino Rubino
« on: September 30, 2017, 03:39:04 PM »
Good growth, Susanne. I've just ordered one from Agrumi Lenzi!

10
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Large spines on second growth
« on: August 31, 2017, 05:54:22 AM »
Yes, Poncirus is always thorny but usually they are much smaller.

11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Large spines on second growth
« on: August 29, 2017, 01:17:30 AM »
Ok, I was just wondering why they were much larger than on the branches that were grown in spring.

12
Citrus General Discussion / Large spines on second growth
« on: August 28, 2017, 10:07:29 AM »
I've noticed that some of my citrus plants grow unusually large spines on their second flush and well, I wonder why. Any ideas?
It is the first time my seed-grown Poncirus does it whereas my ichangensis x sinensis has done it before.

Poncirus


C. ichangensis x sinensis


13
Citrus General Discussion / Re: breeding - what can I do with citron
« on: August 09, 2017, 05:58:03 AM »
I'll be happy to send you some seeds for your breeding efforts of my Citrumelo No. 82 as soon as it starts fruiting. It is said to be the best tasting Citrumelo. Personally, I have never tasted it but the fella in the link know his citrus fruits and he says it is far better tasting than any other Citrumelo, including Dunstan. It's a selection by Eisenhut nursery here in Switzerland. Should be worth a try.
Check out this link, it is in French but there are pics;-)
http://www.forum-agrumes.com/viewtopic.php?t=948&p=14736

14
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citsuma Prague
« on: July 03, 2017, 03:30:29 PM »
Good to know, thanks!

15
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citsuma Prague
« on: July 03, 2017, 02:34:35 PM »
Two flowers have opened and both have four petals but no stigma :o





16
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citsuma Prague
« on: June 23, 2017, 11:43:28 AM »
Quick update, my Citsuma has decided to flower for the first time and I am quite happy.
Ilya, what time of year does yours usually flower? I assume mine is so late because it is the first time?

cheers

17
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Taichang lemon
« on: June 09, 2017, 08:48:15 AM »
I received the seeds from the US..

18
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Taichang lemon
« on: June 09, 2017, 12:39:04 AM »
Well, that isn't quite what I hoped for but at least I don't have any false expectations now. Thanks a lot!
What you say about the fruit size and seeds makes perfectly sense.

19
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Prison Cold Hardy Citrus Grove
« on: June 09, 2017, 12:36:59 AM »
Too bad those are only available in the US!

20
Cold Hardy Citrus / Taichang lemon
« on: June 08, 2017, 04:03:06 AM »
I was given some seeds of this interesting hybrid and three germinated. I'd like to know how they do with members here since there is not much information to be found on the internet. Apparently, they taste good enough and have some cold tolerance (which isn't surprising considering the parents). Pictures are most welcome.
Thanks!

21
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: hybrids with precocious Poncirus
« on: May 30, 2017, 02:07:42 AM »
I regard C. ichangensis or N1Tri as the most promising parents other than Poncirus because neither Yuzu nor Ichang lemon come even close in terms of coldhardiness (there are, admittedly, wimps among C. ichangensis as well but I have not seen any Yuzu survive anything lower than -15C).
I'm going to have to disagree with your logic (at least partially). True, Yuzu is not as hardy as Poncirus or C. ichangensis, but it still holds the cold hardy genes from its papeda ancestor. The fact that Yuzu is not as hardy is irreverent. Yuzu is not an original species, it is a hybrid. Sure you could breed Poncirus with, say an orange, but you'd probably have to make another cross to get something very edible. That's not the case with Yuzu, since Yuzu is much further on the spectrum towards edibility than Poncirus. What I'm saying is it might take 1 or 2 generations of hybridizations with Yuzu to get something very edible, whereas with Poncirus it might take 2 or 3. And by that time the cold hardiness might be diluted down to the same level as a Yuzu hybrid.

How do I explain this? To some extent, when it comes to hybrids there's a trade-off between cold hardiness and edibility. Yuzu might not really be edible itself, but it's infinitely more edible than Poncirus. Since you already have this degree of suitability for eating built in, you're not really necessarily losing anything by starting off with Yuzu. Think of it this way, you've already done the first cross in your breeding sequence, you decided to cross an extremely cold hardy papeda species with sour mandarin, and what you got was something called Yuzu. Now you're going to make the next cross.

If you think you're going to be able to cross Poncirus with some other citrus in just one cross to get something amazing you're delusional.
(You might have better luck with C. ichangensis but I still wouldn't be too optimistic)
It's going to take successive series of breeding, at least 2 generations of crosses, maybe 3.

Now of course there are a number arguments and points that can be made to the contrary, but I'm just conveying my line of reasoning here.

I didn't mean to imply that F1 crosses with Poncirus could suddenly turn out edible, you are certainly right. Nonetheless, anything less hardy than Yuzu is going to be too weak for my climate.

Crosses with N1Tri could be the way to go here since the off-flavours are eliminated. However, from what I've read its offspring is mostly feeble and weak, seeds only germinate very erratically.

But this topic was about precocious Poncirus.. When my seedlings flower I will try to cross them with everything I have and who knows what happens then.. N1Tri x Pt = ultra hardy and still no poncirine / bitterness..? 
And yes, I know, this is just wild thinking.

22
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: hybrids with precocious Poncirus
« on: May 26, 2017, 08:58:43 AM »
I have seven precocious Poncirus seedlings here and if they really do flower after only a few years I will try to cross them with other citrus, too. If the early flowering could be transferred to the offspring, this would save us many years.

No one really knows what happens after the F1, so hybrids with Yuzu or other parents may indeed result in hardier offspring somehow, somewhere down the road.. but for now, I regard C. ichangensis or N1Tri as the most promising parents other than Poncirus because neither Yuzu nor Ichang lemon come even close in terms of coldhardiness (there are, admittedly, wimps among C. ichangensis as well but I have not seen any Yuzu survive anything lower than -15C).

23
Interesting results, thanks for sharing.

24
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citsuma Prague
« on: April 26, 2017, 04:15:06 AM »
This topic is turning out to be so great, thank you all for your contributions.
Sylvain, your plant has a nice, tall trunk. Did it form that all by itself or did you prune it that way? I am asking because you say it will grow upwards over time anyway but at the moment I doubt a bit that mine would form such a nice trunk..

25
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: Citsuma Prague
« on: April 21, 2017, 05:09:35 AM »
Sylvain, would you have a picture of your plant and fruit?

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