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Messages - simon_grow

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1
Growing Lychees from seed and then approach grafting with a sensitive variety such as No Mai Tsze, always Luk or Emperor May be the way to go. These three varieties are very sensitive to the soils in SoCal and Iíve heard they didnít do so well in Florida as well. I have a bunch of Lychee seedlings growing and will attempt to approach graft them with Emperor this year.

Simon

2
Nice yard Kim, you have a lot of room in your yard, compared to my tiny yard.

Simon

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Penang88 is a great durian
« on: Today at 10:07:03 AM »
Thanks for the info Mike. Next time I visit Asia, Iím going to go on a Durian mission to try as many different varieties as possible. My palate was so used to Mornthong, the only variety we used to get here in the USA but now we get Musang King. After trying Musang King, it is now my favorite variety. I like the little bit of bitterness it has, reminds me of the bitterness from straight black coffee. The first time I tried Musang King, the bitterness was not so pleasant but now I crave it. They are currently available at Luckyseafood in Mira Mesa for $10.99/pound.

Simon

4
Atemoya is just as easy to graft as Cherimoya in my experience.

Simon

5
Heneyhart is also a good variety, in my opinion, it hoes have a honey nuance to its flavor. Selma is also a good variety.

Simon

6
Pierce is excellent and so is El Bumpo, Orton, Fino De Jete, Booth, Dr White and many others. I would recommend trying to taste as many different varieties as possible before planting a tree because taste is so subjective. Iíve heard some people complain that Pierce is too sweet but I love it. See if you can find a multigraft tree if possible.

Simon

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Star Apples from Vietnam
« on: January 20, 2018, 01:43:12 PM »
Ok, I just cut open the softest Caimito and it exploded with white milky juice. This one has a small section that tasted like it was just about to ferment but it was quite delicious. It tasted like milk or water with sweetened condensed milk added. It was sweet but just barely. It had a Brix reading of 15%.




Because this first one was over ripe, I cut into another fruit and it was solid but soft. The texture was like almond jello( agar agar) and I preferred this fruit more because it wasnít just mush. It tasted about the same sweetness as the first fruit so I didnít take any additional Brix readings.


I like this fruit and will eat it in a heartbeat and a good friend texted me that it would taste even better if ripened on the tree but it is not a fruit I would make room to grow in my small yard. If I had the room, I would plant a tree to increase diversity but the fruit did not knock my socks off. Iíll keep an open mind and Iím sure Iíll be able to taste a tree ripened Fruit in the future.

Simon

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Lolita Suriname Cherry
« on: January 20, 2018, 10:40:21 AM »
Hereís a brief description of Lolita I found through a Google search.
http://tastylandscape.com/2013/05/17/surinam-cherry-general-overview-and-growing-info/

Sounds like it may have less resinous taste although I found a reference where Oscar sounded like he did not like the Fruit. I have never tasted this variety myself but I love Surinam cherries even with its strong resinous taste.

In case there are any Mango eaters reading this, that resinous taste in Surinam cherries in my opinion is very similar to the resinous taste of a good Indian variety of Mango such as Alphonso, Kesar.

Simon


9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Star Apples from Vietnam
« on: January 20, 2018, 10:27:04 AM »
Waxy, Fruitfool is correct, itís the Seafood City in Mira Mesa off Black Mountain Road.

Raul my friend, thanks for the advice, I will try one when I get home later.

Simon

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Star Apples from Vietnam
« on: January 19, 2018, 11:19:48 AM »
After watching some YouTube videos, I decided to let these ripen a bit more before I open one up. Chris from Trulytropical has a video that shows the purple ones cut up at different stages of ripeness. These fruit I purchased were all slightly soft to the touch similar to a just ripened Peach but there are no wrinkles on the fruit at all.

Jared the weird Fruit explorer has a couple videos and he ate the fruit in what appeared to be somewhat soft but not wrinkled. Iíll report back once I try the fruit.

Simon

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Star Apples from Vietnam
« on: January 18, 2018, 04:51:04 PM »
A good friend from the forum just informed me that they are selling Star Apples imported from Vietnam at Luck Seafood so I picked up a few. They are selling for $7.99/pound. Iíve never eaten them before so Iím excited to try this new fruit but Iím not expecting much from these imported fruit. Iíll give a taste report when I cut them open.





Simon

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Ca atemoya taste
« on: January 18, 2018, 03:42:51 PM »
Iíve only had the Atemoya x Cherimoya crosses so far this year and they have been sweet as normal. The Cherimoya were sweet as well.

If you had too many big fruit on your tree, perhaps it was underfertilized? Is your treein full sun?

Simon

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Turpentine Rootstock Update
« on: January 15, 2018, 11:27:38 PM »
Thanks for the information! I wonder if this other Turpentine rootstock will grow any better than the other Turpentine rootstock that the Florida Nurseries have been using? The Puerto Rican Turpentine rootstock that Leo Manuel uses on some of his trees are excellent growers and extremely heavy producers on that rootstock. Leo Manuelís Todos Santos is on PR Turpentine rootstock and that tree is loaded with fruits and does not show any signs of disease although the grafted variety(Todos Santos) has a lot to do with it.

Simon


The overwhelming majority of mangos that come out of Florida are Zill nursery trees grafted to turpentine from Costa Rica. Been that way for a long time. So this Costa Rican turpentine evidently struggles in California.


Thanks for the clarification Squam256, itís good to know where the source is coming from.

Zands and Har, I agree. The term Turpentine is used very loosely and I brought up the point about Leo having success with the PR Turpentine rootstock in order to inform readers that not all Turpentine rootstocks perform poorly here in SoCal.

Har, I also agree with you that random Mango seedlings can perform excellent in any given area. The issue will be with the consistency of the results. In my ďGrowing Mango trees in Southern CaliforniaĒ thread http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=23124.0. I have been recommending that people plant a variety of different types of Mangos directly seeded into the ground in the hopes that any one of those seedlings may perform better than another seedling in a particular yard.

By planting various Monoembryonic and Polyembryonic varieties within a given yard, you are more likely to find one that performs better at that particular location. A CRFG Mango Fruit facts suggested that Polyembryonic varieties may be more resistant to Anthracnose and Monoembryonic varieties may be more resistant to Powdery Mildew. I know this is a very very broad generalization but it may have some truth to it.

I hope we will get better rootstocks that are highly productive and more disease resistant in the near future. Hopefully some of the hybrid work that Dr Ledesma is doing now will give us a new and better rootstock in the near future.

Simon

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Turpentine Rootstock Update
« on: January 14, 2018, 07:18:16 PM »
Here is some more information on Mango rootstocks in case anyone is interested.
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=20816.0

Simon

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango Turpentine Rootstock Update
« on: January 14, 2018, 07:16:41 PM »
Thanks for the information! I wonder if this other Turpentine rootstock will grow any better than the other Turpentine rootstock that the Florida Nurseries have been using? The Puerto Rican Turpentine rootstock that Leo Manuel uses on some of his trees are excellent growers and extremely heavy producers on that rootstock. Leo Manuelís Todos Santos is on PR Turpentine rootstock and that tree is loaded with fruits and does not show any signs of disease although the grafted variety(Todos Santos) has a lot to do with it.

Simon

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: What is the best variety of loquat?
« on: January 13, 2018, 11:43:42 AM »
The late season Big Jimís are the best tasting loquat I have tried out of about 10-15 varieties including a few seedling selections from Jim Neitzelís yard. The early season Big Jims are bland, sort of on the tart side but the late season fruit are very sweet, almost no tart but with just the perfect acid balance. Some people may want to pick the late season Fruit slightly early so that there is more acidity. The large chicken egg sized fruit makes the fruit more worth the effort it takes to peel.
Simon

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Ilamas on my trees and seeds sprouting
« on: January 13, 2018, 11:38:14 AM »
Yeah, Iím also interested in how you rate illamas compared to Cherimoya or Atemoyas. The fruit looks beautiful.

Simon

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Kauai White Sugarloaf Pineapples
« on: January 13, 2018, 02:28:22 AM »
Iíve been recommending these pineapples to all my friends and everyone loves them. Save the top for planting!

Simon

19
The only place that I know of that sells Mango trees on Manila rootstock is Mimosa Nursery in Anaheim or LA.  Anyone know of any others?  The problem with Mimosa is not everything is labeled.  I am afraid to buy from them.


You can buy manilla trees anywhere.  Best option is to buy one and graft onto it.  Or grow some seeds and graft them.


What is it about turpentine rootstock?


See these threads
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=20816.0
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=15673.0

Not all varieties perform poorly on Florida Turpentine rootstock. There are many different types of Turpentine type Mangos and not all of them perform poorly here in SoCal. Vigorous varieties such as Valencia Pride and several others perform well on Florida Turpentine rootstock.

The Florida Turpentine rootstock trees seem to grow poorly in colder climates, especially those with high pH soils, heavy clay soils and soils with poor drainage. Most Mangos will grow poorly in these types of conditions but from my observations and observations from Mango growers all around SoCal over the last 15 years, other rootstocks including random seedling rootstocks and Laver Manilla Mango rootstocks grow better when planted side by side with Florida Turpentine rootstock trees.

Simon

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New Mango Journey Begins
« on: January 11, 2018, 11:14:20 AM »
Just donít top it now. Depending on how long the tree has been in itís current pot and wether it has filled that pot with roots will determine wether you need to up pot it or not. If itís completely filled itís current pot with roots, you can up pot it to a new container that is slightly bigger giving the plant about 1/2-1 inch or additional room for root growth. Donít stick it into a huge container, you have to gradually increase the size of the container.

Donít top it now because there will be little to no vegetative growth at this time of year and topping it will mean youíre decreasing the amount of energy it can gather through its leaves.

For now, determin where you want your tree to start branching but just let it grow for now. I would actually let it grow and establish(the in ground tree) until the following Spring so that it can grow vegetatively and establish its roots for at least one year. The following Spring, you can top it off at the point where you want branching to start or if youíre ok with where the scaffold branches are now, just let it grow.

If you decide to top it off at letís say 2 or 3 feet, you will probably have removed half or more of its total height and all the growth from last year but your tree will now have an established root system and a slightly thicker trunk that will not be so leggy. After you top it in half, you can remove the green stretchy tape that has been attached to the Mango tree and wooden stake and your remaining trunk should be able to stand up on its own.

The new growth coming off the newly topped shorter tree will grow up straight and and should not be staked. Let it get blown around and it will develop a strong trunk with branching that starts a your desired height.

Simon

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: New Mango Journey Begins
« on: January 10, 2018, 08:06:07 PM »
Ideally, a new Mango tree is planted immediately or shortly after it is purchased and early Spring after last chance of frost is the best time to plant inyo the ground. Others may disagree but planting early will allow your tree to have a longer interval before the next chance of frost.

If you donít get frost, you can plant directly into the ground now but donít top it. You want to keep all the vegetative growth for photosynthesis. Also you want to remove some of the green ties keeping your tree upright but donít remove all of them. You want your tree to sway and bend slightly in the wind so that the trunk will grow thick and strong.

There is a window period of vigorous and active growth, even when you start with good rootstocks and if the roots become pot bound, the tree can get stunted. Itís not only the Turpentine rootstocks that can get stunted. You are on the right track.

Simon

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: My first taste of Dr. White cherimoya
« on: January 09, 2018, 08:18:10 AM »
Hey Sam, the more pollen a flower gets, themore seeds and the larger the fruit gets to a certain extent. Each flower will have a maximum number of seeds it can reach but the better the flower is pollinated, the closer it will get to reaching that maximum. The better pollinated flowers are usually better shaped but they can get very seedy. I only pollinated each flower once but perhaps I have too much pollen in my collection container or maybe I need to lay off the little twist I give my brush when I pollinate each flower.

Simon

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: A stroll through the yard
« on: January 07, 2018, 11:46:22 PM »
 Beautiful fruit Frank, especially considering this is Winter. Iím glad to see you are also still harvesting Sugar Dragons. My vine has been producing non stop all year with a few fruit still hanging. Congrats!

Simon

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Cherimoya prices skyrocketing
« on: January 07, 2018, 02:11:26 PM »
Hereís the price at abc supermarket in little Saigon.  Corner of bolsa and magnolia. A lot of big 2lbs fruits.


Those look like some good sized Dr Whites from mature trees. Thatís a very reasonable price. My local supermarket here is selling them for 7.99/lbs now in January. I believe demand is growing for this fruit because people are finally finding out how amazingly delicious this fruit really is.

Simon

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: My first taste of Dr. White cherimoya
« on: January 07, 2018, 02:01:57 PM »
Nice fruit Sam! Theyíll get even bigger than that, especially the fruit in the interior of the canopy coming off the thicker branches. The good thing about Dr White is that they have great flesh to seed ratio, even if you hand pollinate.

Iíve been having issues with too many seeds in my Cherimoyas due to hand pollination.

Simon

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