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Author Topic: Asiminaholics Anonymous  (Read 12711 times)

FlyingFoxFruits

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Asiminaholics Anonymous
« on: February 12, 2015, 06:55:05 PM »
Now you have found the real A.A.....I figured why not start a thread here for the paw paw addicted people in the world...

I think FL is the world's epicenter for Asimina species....

we even have those super rare deeringothamnus species...which I believe are found nowhere else in the world.

I'm planting parviflora and triloba here in central FL...maybe we can get a cross? or even a decent tasting parviflora would be enough to get me excited about grafting some...I think almost all of the species have variability in flavor, so it's worth seeking out superior strains...even for species that are reported to be poor quality.

Also, I have a friend who fruited A. triloba in central FL, and it made delicious fruits, but production was minimal. 

let's get excited about finding new varieties and species to grow!  maybe even some hybrids!

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Marsbars

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2015, 09:01:15 PM »
I hear that susquehana is one of the best cultivars around. Prone to cracking, bruising, and 1lb fruits too! Ive never tried a pawpaw. Is it possible to bring one to fruition in southern California?. Also the thought of Interspecific hybrids with pawpaw makes brings me to deep contemplation.

Edit: Intergeneric
« Last Edit: February 12, 2015, 09:08:39 PM by Marsbars »

Jsvand5

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2015, 09:31:56 AM »
I just planted a susquehana, Shenandoah , and allegheny last week. I have had a "mango" for a couple years but I planted it in a spot with full shade and it has not grown much at all. It does flower though. I may move it this week but I am worried about the transplant killing it.

Bob407

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2015, 09:54:14 AM »
Jsvand5,  that is great to hear that your "mango" is flowering. What is the size of your tree and how tall was it when planted?
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Jsvand5

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2015, 11:17:02 AM »
Jsvand5,  that is great to hear that your "mango" is flowering. What is the size of your tree and how tall was it when planted?

Not big. Maybe 2 1/2 feet. Might have grown a foot in the last two years. It is is 100% shade though. I am cutting down a big mulberry soon and that should help with the sunlight if I don't end up just moving the pawpaw instead

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2015, 12:41:08 PM »
I just planted a susquehana, Shenandoah , and allegheny last week. I have had a "mango" for a couple years but I planted it in a spot with full shade and it has not grown much at all. It does flower though. I may move it this week but I am worried about the transplant killing it.

have you tried hand pollinating?

my friends have got fruit set with isolated trees, just by hand pollinating...
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Jsvand5

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2015, 03:52:34 PM »
I just planted a susquehana, Shenandoah , and allegheny last week. I have had a "mango" for a couple years but I planted it in a spot with full shade and it has not grown much at all. It does flower though. I may move it this week but I am worried about the transplant killing it.

have you tried hand pollinating?

my friends have got fruit set with isolated trees, just by hand pollinating...

Haven't tried. Figured it was too small anyway. Maybe this season if it flowers again. I'd just like to try a fruit. Seems to be a love them or hate them type fruit from the few people that I know that have tried them.

gator_rider2

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2015, 07:29:19 PM »
Peaches number one some nectarines are great I have peaches at end April.

Sorry new member post wrong thread.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2015, 07:35:25 PM by gator_rider2 »

fyliu

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2015, 11:40:07 PM »
I bought a small plant recently before it went dormant, about 2ft. No idea when it should fruit but it's grafted and I grafted another varietiy onto the rootstock part of it.

What are the good varieties? I know Ed Self and TX rare fruit growers prefer Wabash.

I've tried it twice, once a piece from large fruits shipped from FL and one that's locally grown but small. The small one filled the car with a very nice banana aroma and the fruit was chewier and creamier than cherimoya.

edself65

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2015, 10:04:02 AM »
Yes so far Wabash is my favorite!

Ed

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2015, 10:08:02 AM »
Pawpaw Pollination



This picture is of a pawpaw flower in the receptive stage. The petals are cut away to expose the sexual parts. The large green mass at the bottom is the immature anthers. There are 5 stigma protruding up through mass. If pollinated there is a possibility of 5 fruit. A flower with only say three stigma will develop only three fruit if all are pollinated.
When the petals are still green, the flower is not receptive (female). You want the petals to turn maroon (some green showing is okay). You want the stigmas to be swollen and glisten. The petals will be rather tight. The ball of anthers will be green and tight. When the flower changes to the male stage, the petals flare out more widely, petal color can be darker; the ball of anthers darken and loosen and begin releasing pollen.

The next picture is of a flower which is past the receptive stage and the anthers have matured. The green mass has turned gray and if you look closely pollen is on the petals. The problem is getting this pollen to flowers that are receptive.



This is easy to do. Most flowers hang up side down. Simply take a small bottle such as a prescription bottle hold it under the flower and rake the anthers which contain pollen into the bottle. Be careful to not break off the stigma and ovary which is under the anther mass. Don't worry about separating the pollen from the anthers. Now take a Q-tip or tiny paint brush pull off some of the cotton, not all, Then twist into a smaller ball, dip into the pollen mix and touch to the stigma of receptive flowers. You will get anthers and pollen, but the flower doesn't care and the pollen will find the stigma. Pollen isn't available when the first flowers open due to the delay of maturing anthers. But again that is no problem as the bloom period is nearly two weeks. So don't try pollinating until several days after the first flowers open.


edself65

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2015, 10:33:01 AM »
A few clusters of hand pollinated fruit from my only variety that was blooming at the time of pollinating.







edself65

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2015, 10:48:50 AM »
Pawpaw flower buds




edself65

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edself65

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2015, 06:34:28 AM »

edself65

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« Last Edit: February 18, 2015, 07:38:17 AM by edself65 »

Bob407

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2015, 10:30:03 AM »
Nice pics of the fruit, Ed.
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edself65

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2015, 01:23:39 PM »
Thanks Bob! One is PA Golden and the other one was Wells. They were my favorites till I tried Wabash.

Ed

Nice pics of the fruit, Ed.

nullzero

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #18 on: February 18, 2015, 04:37:14 PM »
Anyone know if Duckworth A,B,C pawpaw selections available anywhere?


Duckworth A: Low-chill cultivar selected in San Mateo, Florida by Eric Duckworth, seedling of Louisiana native parent; tree with pyramidal
shape.

Duckworth B: Low-chill cultivar selected in San Mateo, Florida by Eric Duckworth, seedling of Louisiana native parent; grows no larger
than a shrub.

"Yes, Pawpaws in Palatka
This short report on CRFG member Eric
Duckworth's success in growing pawpaws in
Florida was excerpted from Lynettte Walther's
column, Good Seasons, in the Palatka Daily
News, which we thank for permission to reprint.

"Since everything I read seemed to
indicate that pawpaws grew further to
the north ... and not where I garden in
Northeast Florida, I gave up hope of
growing them myself.

"So imagine my delight when Eric
[Duckworth] assured me not only that
pawpaws grew here, but that they also
produced fruit!

"Now, I have to tell you that Eric's
pawpaws seem to be exceptions to the
rule. So much so that agriculturists
from all over, including some from
universities, have come to Eric's garden
to see for themselves that pawpaws
produce here.

He has developed
three new varieties, each with their
own characteristic. One of them, the
'A' pawpaw, grows in a pyramid shape.
The 'B' grows not larger than a big
shrub, and the 'C' grows in a cluster.

"You see, the parents of Eric's trees
came from Jackson, Parish, La.
" 'They come from Cajun pawpaws,'
Eric said proudly. 'I never told them
they weren't supposed to grow here.' "
« Last Edit: February 18, 2015, 04:39:38 PM by nullzero »
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

edself65

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2015, 04:43:08 PM »
I was able to visit Mr. Duckworth back in the 90 s when I started collecting named varieties of pawpaws. I was able to sample the fruit and did not find the plants to be worth propagating in my opinion.

 Ed

nullzero

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #20 on: February 18, 2015, 04:46:47 PM »
I was able to visit Mr. Duckworth back in the 90 s when I started collecting named varieties of pawpaws. I was able to sample the fruit and did not find the plants to be worth propagating in my opinion.

 Ed

Ok, that would make the low chill qualities a moot point then.
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edself65

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2015, 04:49:22 PM »
How many chill hours do you normally get?

Ed

nullzero

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #22 on: February 18, 2015, 05:29:30 PM »
How many chill hours do you normally get?

Ed

They would be planted in Port Saint Lucie, 1 mi from the river 4 mi from the intercoastal. Zone 10a, +10 year old coconut palms.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

edself65

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #23 on: February 18, 2015, 06:03:47 PM »
Wabash went dormant and leafed out for me 2 years in a roll when I lived in the Orlando area. I would recommend giving it a try. I would plant so it would be in the shade from about noon forward.

Ed


How many chill hours do you normally get?

Ed

They would be planted in Port Saint Lucie, 1 mi from the river 4 mi from the intercoastal. Zone 10a, +10 year old coconut palms.

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Asiminaholics Anonymous
« Reply #24 on: February 18, 2015, 07:45:40 PM »
Ed,

is this plant in the ground or in a pot?

what variety?

nice pic amigo!
A few clusters of hand pollinated fruit from my only variety that was blooming at the time of pollinating.






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