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Author Topic: Annonidium mannii  (Read 15077 times)

Gouralata

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Annonidium mannii
« on: June 04, 2012, 11:42:27 AM »
Hi, I'm looking for seeds of Annonidium mannii and other African jungle fruits as Trichoscypha, Landolphia, Nauclea, Lavigeria, Dioscoreophyllum, ...

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2012, 10:04:21 PM »
ya, put me down for some seeds to!

I've been looking for A. mannii.
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fruitlovers

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2012, 11:53:42 PM »
Hi, I'm looking for seeds of Annonidium mannii and other African jungle fruits as Trichoscypha, Landolphia, Nauclea, Lavigeria, Dioscoreophyllum, ...


I have Landolphia comorensis vines. As soon as they fruit will add it to my seed list.
Oscar

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2012, 10:36:16 AM »
^ That looks like some kind of oyster gone wrong  :P
Hope they taste better than they look!
-Luke

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2012, 01:12:30 PM »
ya, put me down for some seeds to!

I've been looking for A. mannii.
I'm in for some of these too.....

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2012, 06:47:53 AM »
Anonidium mannii grow next door in DR Congo and are in season during March - feel free to sponsor my airticket from Uganda and I will pick some seeds  ;D
« Last Edit: June 22, 2012, 07:06:27 AM by Soren »
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

Gouralata

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2012, 10:51:00 AM »
For sponsoring I think you have to dream a lot but thank you about the fruit season information. I know you're interested by Salacca zalacca and may be Salacca Wallichiana. Tell me if it's true may be we can find a solution for exchange seeds.

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2012, 02:13:20 AM »
Well, let me just say it would not make sense to start discussing a trade for seeds. I don't know any cultivators who are growing this species, and I believe it is top of the list among most serious collectors. Even if someone gets seeds, I doubt they will be offered on this website - an auction on e-bay makes a lot more sense as I reckon they will not go cheaply...
« Last Edit: June 27, 2012, 03:35:38 AM by Soren »
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2012, 04:36:53 AM »
Wow Soren is it really that good and that rare? A few years ago I collected a range of seeds from treed known from a single location or one valley.It sounds like I need to get some seeds of Annonidium mannii as well.

Sorry to take this thread on a tangent.

The only fruit tree species I know that combines exceptional quality and rarity along those same lines.Durio macrantha was described by the guru Kostermans in 1992 and is only known from 2 wild trees I believe.The flavour of the fruit has been assessed as exceptional by durian specialists.An evaluation of this dwarf species found it was the best eating of all non-zibethinus durio,the most cold and wind tolerant by far as well as being the fastest fruiting durio (from seed) and also that it had very high commercial potential.Only one or two growers have them I believe.I plan to have one in the next year whether grafted or a seedling.The wheels re in motion.The original propagator lost almost everything on his farm except them in a cyclone and then gave up on fruit growing.   

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2012, 05:12:30 AM »
Mike - rare as in rarely found in collections as it appears to be very difficult to cultivate but is common in some areas of its natural range. And yes - it is described as very good - using analog descriptions as for durian - though some trees produce sour fruits. It is also one the biggest fruits, which might also be a reason for the interest from collectors.

Surely there are more rare and better tasting fruits out there - but among the African ones this is the jewel - so let me correct myself - top of the list among the African species, and I do get a lot of requests for seeds though I have never seen it yet (it is not growing in Uganda).

edit; and do keep us posted on the Durio macrantha project.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2012, 05:20:08 AM by Soren »
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2012, 06:03:09 AM »
OK Soren you have mentioned the Annonidium before come to think of it.

D.macrantha is one of the great fruit stories with the only trees threatened when the guru found them.Fruit were spirited to illustrious durian folk in australia who had to eat them at the airport.The seedlings came out ahead of dozens of zibethinus clones in a multi-year exhaustive evaluation of all durian characteristics,gene mapping and tolerances carried out by luminaries like lim,dicsabilis and zapalla.It was once again plunged into obscurity by an unprecedented series of cyclones that wiped out the industry and growers.The trees survive on 2 farms one with 15 trees the other with 1 or 2.There could be others.I'll keep you updated and it could be the great hope for subtropical durians with prospects even better than the laplaes (D.zibethinus).   

fruitlovers

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2012, 08:04:06 PM »
Mike - rare as in rarely found in collections as it appears to be very difficult to cultivate but is common in some areas of its natural range. And yes - it is described as very good - using analog descriptions as for durian - though some trees produce sour fruits. It is also one the biggest fruits, which might also be a reason for the interest from collectors.

Surely there are more rare and better tasting fruits out there - but among the African ones this is the jewel - so let me correct myself - top of the list among the African species, and I do get a lot of requests for seeds though I have never seen it yet (it is not growing in Uganda).

edit; and do keep us posted on the Durio macrantha project.


Could another reason that it's so rare be that it can take decades to fruit? At least that is what i read on the net.

Bearing Age: Many trees will not bear fruit for decades.

Fruit: Giant fruit, the largest in the annonaceae family. Generally around 15" long and 4-6 kg. Large fruits are capable of weighing 10-15 kg. Flesh is yellow to orange, and ranges from sweet to sour, depending on ripeness and genetics. It has a very rich flavor, overpowering to some, but generally tastes similar to a mango. Fruits are often disfigured due to inadequate pollination.

http://www.skyfieldtropical.com/encyclopedia/junglesop/
Oscar

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2012, 08:06:18 PM »
OK Soren you have mentioned the Annonidium before come to think of it.

D.macrantha is one of the great fruit stories with the only trees threatened when the guru found them.Fruit were spirited to illustrious durian folk in australia who had to eat them at the airport.The seedlings came out ahead of dozens of zibethinus clones in a multi-year exhaustive evaluation of all durian characteristics,gene mapping and tolerances carried out by luminaries like lim,dicsabilis and zapalla.It was once again plunged into obscurity by an unprecedented series of cyclones that wiped out the industry and growers.The trees survive on 2 farms one with 15 trees the other with 1 or 2.There could be others.I'll keep you updated and it could be the great hope for subtropical durians with prospects even better than the laplaes (D.zibethinus).

Dicsabilis was main speaker at one of our conferences. Real nice fellow, and very knowledgeable. Ok, guess what's on my seed want list now? HAHA
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #13 on: June 27, 2012, 08:33:09 PM »
Oscar it is a bit of a white whale of the tropical fruit world and durian specialists talk about it in hushed tones of respect.Most have given up on ever getting seeds.A friend has been promised a grafted tree or seedling afyter years of cultivating a connection.I am muscling in on his action and if I get seeds I'll spead them out so this great white durian hope is not lost.Kostermans was glowing about it apparently and it doesn't lose a leaf at 34f.

fruitlovers

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #14 on: June 27, 2012, 08:44:35 PM »
Oscar it is a bit of a white whale of the tropical fruit world and durian specialists talk about it in hushed tones of respect.Most have given up on ever getting seeds.A friend has been promised a grafted tree or seedling afyter years of cultivating a connection.I am muscling in on his action and if I get seeds I'll spead them out so this great white durian hope is not lost.Kostermans was glowing about it apparently and it doesn't lose a leaf at 34f.

Oh no! Another one for my list of holy grails?
Oscar

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #15 on: June 28, 2012, 05:31:40 AM »
Mike - rare as in rarely found in collections as it appears to be very difficult to cultivate but is common in some areas of its natural range. And yes - it is described as very good - using analog descriptions as for durian - though some trees produce sour fruits. It is also one the biggest fruits, which might also be a reason for the interest from collectors.

Surely there are more rare and better tasting fruits out there - but among the African ones this is the jewel - so let me correct myself - top of the list among the African species, and I do get a lot of requests for seeds though I have never seen it yet (it is not growing in Uganda).

edit; and do keep us posted on the Durio macrantha project.


Could another reason that it's so rare be that it can take decades to fruit? At least that is what i read on the net.

Bearing Age: Many trees will not bear fruit for decades.

Fruit: Giant fruit, the largest in the annonaceae family. Generally around 15" long and 4-6 kg. Large fruits are capable of weighing 10-15 kg. Flesh is yellow to orange, and ranges from sweet to sour, depending on ripeness and genetics. It has a very rich flavor, overpowering to some, but generally tastes similar to a mango. Fruits are often disfigured due to inadequate pollination.

http://www.skyfieldtropical.com/encyclopedia/junglesop/



True - that is what I read from several accounts as well (though the accounts may be related). From Lost crops of African volume III;

"Although essentially unknown outside Central Africa, individual trees now can be found in southern Florida, Hawaii, Malaysia, and northern Queensland (Australia)."

So you or Mike might find it easier to locate a tree than I.

Btw; check the size of the flower - the bottom part of the photo shows a hand.

from http://afroannons.myspecies.info/category/african-annonaceae/annonaceae/anonidium/anonidium-mannii
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #16 on: June 28, 2012, 06:37:12 AM »
Soren, I thrash a few bushes,shake a few trees and make some noise and see if I can flush some local Annonidium from the shadows and undergrowth.I'll let you know if I get some seeds.

fruitlovers

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #17 on: June 28, 2012, 06:45:30 AM »
That must be the largest annona flower! I wonder where in Hawaii they mean this plant was introduced?? I'll ask at the experimental stations.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #18 on: June 28, 2012, 06:49:56 AM »
http://rfcarchives.org.au/Next/PeoplePlaces/ZaireBest3-95.htm
Oscar this group may have been the source.It may be difficult to get seeds from the one mentioned.If you go to the recipe page you posted and click on any fruit species listed, stories come up.

fruitlovers

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #19 on: June 28, 2012, 06:55:14 AM »
http://rfcarchives.org.au/Next/PeoplePlaces/ZaireBest3-95.htm
Oscar this group may have been the source.It may be difficult to get seeds from the one mentioned.If you go to the recipe page you posted and click on any fruit species listed, stories come up.


Paul D. Noren and Roy M. Danforth were missionaries in Zaire, but haven't been sending seeds for more than a dozen years. I think neither of them is still in Africa? Maybe you know their whereabouts Soren?
Oscar

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #20 on: June 28, 2012, 07:36:33 AM »
I think they are both in Africa - remember a reference from an Echo newsletter?! Perhaps we have a member on this forum who knows them through the Echo network as they have been active there... Otherwise there should be many other missionaries in Congo and neighboring countries doing agricultural work and with an interest for fruits?

Mike - if they have not been sending seeds for many years - and they indeed introduced A. mannii to the world - chances are good a mature tree could be found, so worth a shot.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2012, 07:54:31 AM by Soren »
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #21 on: July 01, 2012, 08:03:54 PM »
I'd imagine the plants live in NQ. They were featured on the cover of the RFR issue on fruit collecting a few years back. Seedlings of those fruits should be scattered about.
I know the other yellow African fruit that looks a bit like yellow pandanus is around, but dont know if it fruits.

Oscar, that fruit you posted looks like a second-hand jackfruit curry!  ;D

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2012, 03:36:56 AM »
Even if someone gets seeds, I doubt they will be offered on this website...

I was happy to say I was wrong about this  8) And Bruce - you are referring to the Giant Yellow Mulberry (Myrianthus arboreus) which is dioecious.
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #23 on: August 04, 2012, 07:29:22 AM »
Confirmed that Junglesop is in NQ and fruiting. Now, just have to work on getting the seeds. Shouldn't be a big problem though...

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #24 on: August 04, 2012, 03:34:31 PM »
Confirmed that Junglesop is in NQ and fruiting. Now, just have to work on getting the seeds. Shouldn't be a big problem though...

Sounds great; got the story on the source etc?
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

 

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