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Author Topic: Annonidium mannii  (Read 14786 times)

Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2012, 04:26:38 PM »
BMc if I know the person or location I can put an extraction plan in place.

BMc

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #26 on: August 05, 2012, 12:54:31 AM »
BMc if I know the person or location I can put an extraction plan in place.

I sent an email. It might be to your work address though? I should have more details in a few days.

BMc

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #27 on: August 05, 2012, 06:39:04 PM »
Whoops, I'll have to retract my last statement. There are trees in NQ but still dont know the whereabouts of any bearing trees in NQ  :(
There is a seed source in NQ, but the seeds come via Cameroon.

Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2012, 05:20:48 AM »
http://www.skyfieldtropical.com/encyclopedia/junglesop/
It would take a bit to eat a 30lber.There is supposed to be much variation in quality between trees that is genetic not environmental.
 


BMc

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2012, 05:24:26 AM »
Does anyone know if they need cross pollination, etc? I'm trying to figure out how many seeds to buy.  ;D
I'll buy some and then post pics to confirm its all above board and I've got the real deal. Then PM me if you want details of the person and are happy to risk that the seeds will be viable after travelling from Africa to Cairns and back to wherever you are...

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #30 on: August 07, 2012, 06:21:59 AM »
http://www.skyfieldtropical.com/encyclopedia/junglesop/
It would take a bit to eat a 30lber.There is supposed to be much variation in quality between trees that is genetic not environmental.
 



Mike - the photo appears to be of Annona senegalensis. The sucker is photographed here; http://www.flickr.com/photos/36517976@N06/3515148382/#in/photostream/

I am not familiar with the degree of self-fertility for other Annonaceae than Annona spp., but assuming it behaves like species from this genus; I guess more than one tree would be required.
Søren
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Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #31 on: August 07, 2012, 06:37:28 AM »
Soren I am glad you cleared that up because the picture seemed out of sinc with other photos I had seen of it and thought it represented variability within the species.

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #32 on: August 07, 2012, 06:41:00 AM »
I wonder if Troy (who sells the seeds) or someone else have any information regarding if they are recalcitrant or not?
Søren
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Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #33 on: August 07, 2012, 06:49:25 AM »
Soren do you ever see masuku (Uapaca kirkiana) or gingerbread plums (Parinari spp.) in your neck of the woods an is A.senegalensis a worthwhile fruit?

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #34 on: August 07, 2012, 07:05:01 AM »
Soren do you ever see masuku (Uapaca kirkiana) or gingerbread plums (Parinari spp.) in your neck of the woods an is A.senegalensis a worthwhile fruit?

Yes, I have seen Uapaca kirkiana but not tasted it - it is not uncommon in parts of Uganda - the Parinari I have encountered is Parinari excelsa which is consider lesser than others when it comes to fruits. And regarding Annona senegalensis it is consider one of the better, though a lot of variation exists and Annona stenophylla is suppose to be even better. I have been chasing the last for years with no luck - it doesn't grow here in Uganda but next door in Tanzania.
Søren
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Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #35 on: August 07, 2012, 07:22:29 AM »
Soren thanks for the info,I have seen references to these species/genera several times and know that further south in places like Zambia they are appreciated.

BMc

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #36 on: August 19, 2012, 07:08:54 AM »
Some happy snaps from Cairns







The round thing is a US $1 coin for scale. Just bigger than a Quarter.

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #37 on: August 19, 2012, 10:09:56 PM »
I recognize the coin, but what are the other things? Are the big seeds the annonidium seeds? What are the smaller seeds?
Oscar

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #38 on: September 02, 2012, 02:00:12 PM »
I believe that the location of Junglesop (Anonidium mannii) in Hawaii would be the property of the daughter of Bill Whitman.  She would also have several other rare Annonaceae.  She is a Hawaiian airline pilot.
Har

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #39 on: September 03, 2012, 07:53:04 AM »
I recognize the coin, but what are the other things? Are the big seeds the annonidium seeds? What are the smaller seeds?

Small seeds are of 'bush pineapple'. I was asked to id a verbal description of a tree that had wrinkly yellow fruit like a pandanus, and were originally collected from africa, planted by an oldschool collector some 30 years ago. 99% its myrianthus arboreus.

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #40 on: September 04, 2012, 02:08:27 AM »
I recognize the coin, but what are the other things? Are the big seeds the annonidium seeds? What are the smaller seeds?


Small seeds are of 'bush pineapple'. I was asked to id a verbal description of a tree that had wrinkly yellow fruit like a pandanus, and were originally collected from africa, planted by an oldschool collector some 30 years ago. 99% its myrianthus arboreus.


Bruce - the seeds of M. arboreus are fairly big, see http://postimage.org/image/ku99p60vl/; there are several other Myrianthus species but with smaller fruits - now I am not sure 'how big' a US $1 coin is, but could the seeds be from one of the smaller species.?
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

BMc

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #41 on: September 04, 2012, 02:18:39 AM »
They looked exactly like that, but around half the size - so probably a smaller fruited species?
The $1 coin is about the size of a US Quater?

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #42 on: September 04, 2012, 05:34:16 AM »
They looked exactly like that, but around half the size - so probably a smaller fruited species?
The $1 coin is about the size of a US Quater?

Could be intraspecific variation but likely a different species; I have a key for myrianthus holstii and m. arboreus if you have access to the parent trees..?
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #43 on: September 21, 2012, 12:01:08 PM »
Hi, I just jointed Tropical Fruit Forum but have been a lurker for a while now. BMc, if you do get some seeds from your source, that would be great if you would be willing to sell some. It sounds like a lot of people have already inquired, but I thought I'd ask anyway because you just never know.
Nikki

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #44 on: September 30, 2012, 09:28:57 PM »
I am looking for A. manii for may years, willing to tradem willing to buy and may even better willing to travel LOL

Carlos

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #45 on: September 30, 2012, 11:31:27 PM »
how long usually for these junglesops to germinate?
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davidgarcia899

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #46 on: September 30, 2012, 11:35:46 PM »
how long usually for these junglesops to germinate?

Good question, I am guessing you got yours a couple weeks ago?
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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #47 on: September 30, 2012, 11:54:39 PM »
I got one seed from a puddy ol bal of mine.

The seed was big and looked viable ... so I'm hoping for the best...I've been drenching with chelated Fe already and watering with mostly rain water...I really have high hopes to get this one to grow for at least a few years!  I love to see some bark and some big leaves...even if I can't fruit it.

I don't know who the source was for the seed though...although I believe it did come from Africa somewhere... ;)

unfortunately I think they take about 90-120 days to pop if I remember reading right.




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Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #48 on: October 01, 2012, 12:21:45 AM »
Saff it will grow and you can just plant it in potting mix and wait 20 days for the root to emerge and quite a bit longer for the shoot.I heard a rumor that it came from Cameroon and toured the world until it reached you.

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #49 on: October 01, 2012, 12:50:07 AM »
I love rumors that involve Cameroon and rare plants that have the word Annon in them...oh ya...and the name Saff.

 ;D

thanks for the tip little birdy.

 ;D
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