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Author Topic: Annonidium mannii  (Read 16858 times)

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #50 on: October 01, 2012, 12:54:45 AM »
Only 20 days till I might see a root!!???

I'm racing against a biological clock and old man winter is breathing down my back...tell me more little birdie!  When might I see a shoot of leaves
« Last Edit: February 05, 2013, 01:28:53 AM by ASaffron »
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Mike T

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #51 on: October 01, 2012, 01:07:35 AM »
It may just be loose talk around the forum but if it came from a fruit lying around the rainforest 10 weeks ago, I would be swabbing for bonobo saliva before putting the seed near your mouth.Shoot emergence and root development is temp dependant and if your av. max is already below 28c and min is below 21c there could be some ass-dragging.
I am sure other forum members could add to the story.

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #52 on: October 01, 2012, 01:36:03 AM »
Yes so far the only know source is through Cameroon - I do understand that the locals don't eat the fruit and I therefore believe that strain / subspecies could be bland. I had roots on one seed when I received it - yet to see any sprouting...
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #53 on: October 01, 2012, 05:07:18 AM »
Yes so far the only know source is through Cameroon - I do understand that the locals don't eat the fruit and I therefore believe that strain / subspecies could be bland. I had roots on one seed when I received it - yet to see any sprouting...

That's bad news after all the hype and difficulty getting them. :'(
Oscar

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #54 on: October 01, 2012, 05:25:21 AM »
I was told they were from a good quality fruit.Soren I suppose you have penetrated the supply chain one step further but it would be interesting to get a comment from the actual collectors and local people.There could be a number of reasons for not eating them.

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #55 on: October 01, 2012, 06:44:12 AM »
Yes, I met Eric from CENDEP here in Kampala a couple of weeks ago and he asked me why everybody wanted jungle-sop since they don't eat it in Cameroon - only the animals (and he is one behind the export).
Anyway - I will ask him again if anyone tried eating it by now  ;D



The African fruit hunters; Eric Wirsiy and I finally meet up in Kampala, mid September 2012.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2012, 07:01:41 AM by Soren »
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #56 on: October 01, 2012, 07:00:39 AM »
That's kind of comical! Everybody here dying to get junglesop, and then nobody there eats it? Must be pretty bad if they feed it only to cattle.
Oscar

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #57 on: October 01, 2012, 07:26:17 AM »
From Lost Crops of Africa;

"....In the Central African Republic, for instance, people reportedly pay up to two days salary for a single junglesop. And special trips are organized to collect the fruits during the season...."

and

"...Just how mature the fruit was when picked can affect the sweetness, but genetics also plays a part, and locals know individual trees that are always sweet and others that are always sour.
As in most annonaceous fruits, the flavor is rich—but in this case it is sometimes so rich that a person cannot eat more than a few bites at a time. But apparently not everyone is so inhibited: People in northern Congo, for instance, say that five hungry men can completely fill their stomachs with a good-sized junglesop!"


Amigo - plant some seeds, wait 10-15 years and we can discuss the taste issue! By the way - I have invited Eric to join this forum, let us see if he can help us on issue...
« Last Edit: October 01, 2012, 07:29:48 AM by Soren »
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #58 on: October 01, 2012, 07:42:49 AM »
Eric just wrote (must be stuck in office today like me);

"Annonidium is not eaten in Cameroon so i can not say  anything about the test.
 
I hear it is eaten in Congo or Gabon

I am yet to join the fruit forum"

I.e. it is likely an acquired taste like Durian, which I guess doesn't mean it is bad
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #59 on: October 01, 2012, 07:47:34 AM »
Maybe they are the durian of Annonaceae and an acquired taste.

fruitlovers

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #60 on: October 01, 2012, 08:20:26 AM »
It's a great fruit but nobody in Cameroon eats it because none of them have acquired a taste for it?  :o ::) My guess is that your original assesmen Soren is correct and the ones in Cameroon  are not the best of the group. But i'll let you know in 10-15 years if i acquired a taste for it.  ;) I can always feed it to the cattle here!
« Last Edit: October 01, 2012, 08:22:31 AM by fruitlovers »
Oscar

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #61 on: October 01, 2012, 08:41:34 AM »
It's a great fruit but nobody in Cameroon eats it because none of them have acquired a taste for it?  :o ::) My guess is that your original assesmen Soren is correct and the ones in Cameroon  are not the best of the group. But i'll let you know in 10-15 years if i acquired a taste for it.  ;) I can always feed it to the cattle here!

Haha, did Eric mention porcupines or elephants - anyway it wasn't cattle!
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #62 on: October 01, 2012, 10:28:47 AM »
I've read a manuscript online that said the fruits are quite variable, and some are much better for eating out of hand...others can be just plain hard to eat (acid flavor, fibrous, strong aroma if I recall reading)

I'm just growing one because it's the 2nd largest tree borne fruit, and an annona.

I want bragging rights of being able to fruit this one.  I thought the soursop was a challenge, this seed will be my new video game for the next decade or longer (if I can germinate and keep alive)
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Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #63 on: October 01, 2012, 12:32:34 PM »
Hi Dudes ;D,

I wonder if Cameroonians don't eat the fruit because of their appearance cause i have seen pix of fruits with a burnt ''charcoal'' type peal :-\ I guess them genes play a very important part of a top notch fruit ;)

You guys that are going to grow mannii...they are understory trees, that needs shade in their first few years and because of their huge leaves, they dislike windy conditions. ;)

Soren, It's going to be awesome to have another African member here 8) Hope Eric joins and shares some of his hunting stories :)
« Last Edit: October 01, 2012, 12:35:25 PM by Jackfruitwhisperer69 »
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FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #64 on: October 01, 2012, 12:35:50 PM »
I believe the junglesop is highly susceptible to anthracnose...and this is the reason for that charcoal burnt look.

and maybe they don't eat that fruit because they have so much other amazing fruit!

thanks for the tips about annonidium mannii.

I will have to make sure mine stays shaded and protected! 4 ever!
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FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #65 on: October 01, 2012, 12:39:52 PM »
found a pic of whitmans trees.


they look a bit stressed from a storm.

They're protected from sun in his famous shade houses...I wish someone would make me a nice house, and feed me and take care of me!  in Miami, FL.  and spray me with copper.  ;D ;D  and cut my limbs  ;D ;D haha...never mind.

I guess there's benefits to being a human.



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Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #66 on: October 01, 2012, 12:52:23 PM »
I believe the junglesop is highly susceptible to anthracnose...and this is the reason for that charcoal burnt look.

and maybe they don't eat that fruit because they have so much other amazing fruit!

thanks for the tips about annonidium mannii.

I will have to make sure mine stays shaded and protected! 4 ever!

Hi Adam,
Now that you mentioned, mannii being susceptible to anthracnose...anthracnose will definitely damage the fruit and give it a burnt charcoal look...why didn't i think of that :-[ I guess anthracnose flew out the window ;D Thanks for pointing that out...now i know why the fruit looked like charcoal 8)

You're welcome, Adam :)

Yikes, those trees look very sad :( they sure don't like the wind!

Time is like a river.
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Enjoy every moment of your life!

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #67 on: October 01, 2012, 01:00:28 PM »
hey Steven,

Maybe it was cold? and not the wind?

I can't tell??

what do u think???
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Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #68 on: October 01, 2012, 01:13:55 PM »
hey Steven,

Maybe it was cold? and not the wind?

I can't tell??

what do u think???

Hi again,
Yeah, you're right...the cold can do some damage. The trees at Whitmans got hit by cold and didn't totally defoliate, that's good news. Though, to what extent it's cold hardy remains a mystery! I reckon mannii can produce fruit in Florida...If i recall properly, even a mangosteen has produced in Florida...So, why not mannii?
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

Guanabanus

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #69 on: October 01, 2012, 03:04:04 PM »
The picture of Whitman's trees was taken when they were seriously going downhill.  They, three I believe, had been 12-15 feet tall and dark green.

Chances are that some of the Mycorrhizal and bacterial mixes now available would help a lot.

There are many good Tropical Rain-Forest tree fruits that are rarely eaten by humans, except on lucky moments right after storms that broke off branches, because the fruits don't fall until they are spoiled.  Birds and monkeys do normally eat them all.  I don't know if this is the case with Anonidium mannii.
Har

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #70 on: October 01, 2012, 09:02:39 PM »
Anyone get a seedling up yet? I've only just got a new heat mat, sfter the last one ist kaput.

I've been told and directed to one reference that the Junglesop is comparable to Soursop in cold tolerance. I'll be growing on the fringe of a rainforest patch right at the edge of the soursop zone, that flirts with 0c for a few weeks per year, so here's to hoping the report is correct.

Soren

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #71 on: October 02, 2012, 02:40:10 AM »
Bruce - I will put my money on you unless Troy throw a few seeds in a pot himself.. We want photos! Anyone knows the age of whitmans trees? This baby will take forever to flower for what I know.
Anyway - talking about cultural differences and who-is-eating-what; here in Uganda we mainly consume the pulp of Irvingia gabonensis, while Eric told me they only eat the seed in Cameroon. In general - the local population is aware of what is edible and what is not, so when they don't eat the Jungle-sop in Cameroon it must be linked to the taste. 
Søren
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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #72 on: October 04, 2012, 06:33:44 PM »
There is a strong genetic component to appreciation of flavors, as well as a strong cultural influence.

Some families of Haitians despise mangos, because mangos are too sweet!
Har

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #73 on: October 04, 2012, 08:29:17 PM »
There is a strong genetic component to appreciation of flavors, as well as a strong cultural influence.

Some families of Haitians despise mangos, because mangos are too sweet!

I think that is also true with Polynesians they don't like sweet fruits,. Their solution: eat the mangos green, or pickle them. Also they ate most bananas cooked green. Wi apple (ambarella) is also eaten green or pickled.
Oscar

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Re: Annonidium mannii
« Reply #74 on: October 04, 2012, 09:23:31 PM »
There is a strong genetic component to appreciation of flavors, as well as a strong cultural influence.

Some families of Haitians despise mangos, because mangos are too sweet!

I think that is also true with Polynesians they don't like sweet fruits,. Their solution: eat the mangos green, or pickle them. Also they ate most bananas cooked green. Wi apple (ambarella) is also eaten green or pickled.

Yes, but the green bananas are still often mixed with heaps of sugar, custard and even Milo! lol
My best friend growing up was Samoan and I never did get why they ate everything in the starchy state, but with added sugar, rather than eating them when they had sugared-up naturally. Delicious never the less.  ;D

 

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